Matching Items (18)

Literature Review of Mobility and Psychological Attitude to Assess the Possible Need for Mobility Apparatus in Pediatric Wards

Description

The importance of mobility and psychological attitude during hospitalization and how they correlate with recovery is highlighted in this paper through a review of the research literature on both topics.

The importance of mobility and psychological attitude during hospitalization and how they correlate with recovery is highlighted in this paper through a review of the research literature on both topics. The literature review revealed that increased mobility and positive psychological cognitive state are correlated positively with increased recovery among hospitalized individuals. The research findings have led to the development of child mobility apparatuses called "Lily Pads" being constructed and donated to pediatric hospitals with the intention of helping increase patient mobility and positivity in pediatric wards of hospitals. A history of the lily pads and their potentially positive impact is presented as well as a brief description of the construction process, should readers like to build and donate these apparatuses to their local hospital. It is concluded that further empirical research on the use and effects of lily pads in pediatric wards and the possible correlation with pediatric recovery is needed in order to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the apparatuses' effectiveness.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Collaborative Thesis Project- Autonomous Vehicles

Description

By 2030, annual global automobile production is projected to reach over 110 million vehicles with an increasing quantity having autonomous capabilities. Based on this trend, Company X is poised to

By 2030, annual global automobile production is projected to reach over 110 million vehicles with an increasing quantity having autonomous capabilities. Based on this trend, Company X is poised to drive profits by leveraging advancing technology from their subsidiary to gain significant market share within the AV industry. This will solidify Company X’s position as a key player and leader within the AV industry, which is expected to grow to $7 trillion by 2050, and Company X can achieve this by providing a technology suite including a systems on a chip to auto manufacturers and creating partnerships in the technology and automotive industry.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Elderly People and Individuals with Disabilities: An Analysis of the Civil Right to Mobility

Description

Abstract Older adults and people with disabilities are two unique populations, though they intersect in their need for mobility options that are often not met by traditional transportation services. There

Abstract Older adults and people with disabilities are two unique populations, though they intersect in their need for mobility options that are often not met by traditional transportation services. There is consensus that the government should provide assistance for older adults and people with disabilities to achieve and maintain independence. However, the challenge lies in addressing the many forms of mobility inequity. Population projections for the twenty-first century have sparked interest in the rights of these two populations. As the population of the United States of America ages, supporting the mobility of seniors and individuals with disabilities will become imperative to maintaining their quality of life. One existing federal grant, Section 5310: Enhanced Mobility for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities (49 U.S.C. 5310) provides formula funding for services that provide transportation options to older adults and people with disabilities. While the 5310 program provides crucial funding to non-profits and government agencies to support mobility options for older adults and people with disabilities, it does not address the full scope of mobility issues faced by these two communities. This thesis project provides a thorough analysis of this grant from the federal legislation it is founded on, to the local administration of this grant as applied by the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG). Finally, this thesis looks at emerging technology with the potential to revolutionize mobility, along with sobering historical context of the barriers faced older adults and people with disabilities.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Design for People With Limited Range of Motion in the Pleasure Product Industry

Description

According to Dr. Chris Donaghue, Ph.D., LCSW, CST, “There are a good number of psychological benefits associated with incorporating sex toys into relationships and self-pleasure”. This is also widely accepted

According to Dr. Chris Donaghue, Ph.D., LCSW, CST, “There are a good number of psychological benefits associated with incorporating sex toys into relationships and self-pleasure”. This is also widely accepted across the pleasure product and medical industries. Pleasure products like sex toys can positively impact users’ quality of sleep, self esteem, and relationships. While there is a wide variety of pleasure products available on the current market, few of these options are suitable for people with limited range of motion. This inequity within the sex toy industry negatively impacts the wellness of people with limited range of motion. These negative impacts range from lowered self esteem and happiness to greater stress and conflict within sexual relationships both with others and with themselves. This project seeks to provide a meaningful design solution for people with limited range of motion, and provide insight on the design considerations that must be taken within the pleasure product industry to better address the needs of people with limited range of motion.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Hopping Mobility Mechanism for Robotic Exploration of Lunar Lava Pits

Description

A robotic exploration mission that would enter a lunar pit to characterize the environment is described. A hopping mechanism for the robot's mobility is proposed. Various methods of hopping drawn

A robotic exploration mission that would enter a lunar pit to characterize the environment is described. A hopping mechanism for the robot's mobility is proposed. Various methods of hopping drawn from research literature are discussed in detail. The feasibilities of mechanical, electric, fluid, and combustive methods are analyzed. Computer simulations show the mitigation of the risk of complex autonomous navigation systems. A mechanical hopping mechanism is designed to hop in Earth gravity and carry a payload half its mass. A physical experiment is completed and proves a need for further refinement of the prototype design. Future work is suggested to continue exploring hopping as a mobility method for the lunar robot.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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The Influence of Class Nonlinear Dynamics and Education on Socio-Economic Mobility

Description

The dissertation addresses questions tied in to the challenges posed by the impact of environmental factors on the nonlinear dynamics of social upward mobility. The proportion of educated individuals

The dissertation addresses questions tied in to the challenges posed by the impact of environmental factors on the nonlinear dynamics of social upward mobility. The proportion of educated individuals from various socio-economic backgrounds is used as a proxy for the environmental impact on the status quo state.

Chapter 1 carries out a review of the mobility models found in the literature and sets the economic context of this dissertation. Chapter 2 explores a simple model that considers poor and rich classes and the impact that educational success may have on altering mobility patterns. The role of the environment is modeled through the use of a modified version of the invasion/extinction model of Richard Levins. Chapter 3 expands the socio-economic classes to include a large middle class to study the role of social mobility in the presence of higher heterogeneity. Chapter 4 includes demographic growth and explores what would be the time scales needed to accelerate mobility. The dissertation asked how long it will take to increase by 22% the proportion of educated from the poor classes under demographic versus non-demographic growth conditions. Chapter 5 summarizes results and includes a discussion of results. It also explores ways of modeling the influence of nonlinear dynamics of mobility, via exogenous factors. Finally, Chapter 6 presents economic perspectives about the role of environmental influence on college success. The framework can be used to incorporate the impact of economic factors and social changes, such as unemployment, or gap between the haves and have nots. The dissertation shows that peer influence (poor influencing the poor) has a larger effect than class influence (rich influencing the poor). Additionally, more heterogeneity may ease mobility of groups but results depend on initial conditions. Finally, average well-being of the community and income disparities may improve over time. Finally, population growth may extend time scales needed to achieve a specific goal of educated poor.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Traveling monastic paths : mobility and religion in medieval Ireland at five early and late medieval Irish monasteries

Description

Mobility is an important aspect of the lives of religious individuals described by medieval texts in early and late medieval Ireland, and biogeochemical methods can be used to detect mobility

Mobility is an important aspect of the lives of religious individuals described by medieval texts in early and late medieval Ireland, and biogeochemical methods can be used to detect mobility in archaeological populations. Stories are recorded of monks and nuns traveling and founding monasteries across Ireland, Scotland, England, Wales, and other areas of Europe. However, these texts rarely address the quotidian lives of average monks and nuns who lived in monastic communities. This dissertation seeks to understand if travel was a typical part of the experiences of religious and lay people in early and late medieval Ireland. It also aims to increase understanding of how monastic communities related to the local lay communities, including addressing if the monastery was populated by those who grew up in the local area. Another methodological aim of this dissertation is to advance the field of archaeological biogeochemistry by (1) adding to the bioavailable strontium baseline in Ireland and (2) quantifying the contribution of ocean-derived strontium to coastal environments. These topics are explored through the biogeochemical analysis of 88 individuals buried at 5 early and late medieval monasteries in Ireland and the analysis of a total of 85 plant samples from four counties in Ireland. The three papers in this dissertation present: (1) a summary of the mobility of religious and lay people buried at the monasteries (Chapter 2), (2) a case study presenting evidence for fosterage of a local child at the early medieval monastery of Illaunloughan, Co. Kerry (Chapter 3), and (3) a study designed to quantify the impact of sea spray on bioavailable strontium in coastal environments (Chapter 4). The majority of lay and religious individuals studied were estimated to be local, indicating that medieval Irish Christianity was strongly rooted in the local community. The study of ocean-derived strontium in a coastal environment indicates that sea spray has a non-uniform impact on bioavailable strontium in coastal regions. These findings shed new light on medieval monastic and lay life in Ireland through the application of biogeochemical methods, contributing to the growth of the field of archaeological chemistry in Ireland.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Consequences of short term mobility across heterogeneous risk environments: the 2014 west African Ebola outbreak

Description

In this dissertation the potential impact of some social, cultural and economic factors on

Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) dynamics and control are studied. In Chapter two, the inability

to detect and isolate

In this dissertation the potential impact of some social, cultural and economic factors on

Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) dynamics and control are studied. In Chapter two, the inability

to detect and isolate a large fraction of EVD-infected individuals before symptoms onset is

addressed. A mathematical model, calibrated with data from the 2014 West African outbreak,

is used to show the dynamics of EVD control under various quarantine and isolation

effectiveness regimes. It is shown that in order to make a difference it must reach a high

proportion of the infected population. The effect of EVD-dead bodies has been incorporated

in the quarantine effectiveness. In Chapter four, the potential impact of differential

risk is assessed. A two-patch model without explicitly incorporate quarantine is used to

assess the impact of mobility on communities at risk of EVD. It is shown that the

overall EVD burden may lessen when mobility in this artificial high-low risk society is allowed.

The cost that individuals in the low-risk patch must pay, as measured by secondary

cases is highlighted. In Chapter five a model explicitly incorporating patch-specific quarantine

levels is used to show that quarantine a large enough proportion of the population

under effective isolation leads to a measurable reduction of secondary cases in the presence

of mobility. It is shown that sharing limited resources can improve the effectiveness of

EVD effective control in the two-patch high-low risk system. Identifying the conditions

under which the low-risk community would be willing to accept the increases in EVD risk,

needed to reduce the total number of secondary cases in a community composed of two

patches with highly differentiated risks has not been addressed. In summary, this dissertation

looks at EVD dynamics within an idealized highly polarized world where resources

are primarily in the hands of a low-risk community – a community of lower density, higher

levels of education and reasonable health services – that shares a “border” with a high-risk

community that lacks minimal resources to survive an EVD outbreak.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Vertical Carrier Transport Properties and Device Application of InAs/InAs1-xSbx Type-II Superlattice and a Water-Soluble Lift-Off Technology

Description

The first part of this dissertation reports the study of the vertical carrier transport and device application in InAs/InAs1-xSbx strain-balanced type-II superlattice. It is known that the low hole mobility

The first part of this dissertation reports the study of the vertical carrier transport and device application in InAs/InAs1-xSbx strain-balanced type-II superlattice. It is known that the low hole mobility in the InAs/InAs1-xSbx superlattice is considered as the main reason for the low internal quantum efficiency of its mid-wave and long-wave infrared photodetectors, compared with that of its HgCdTe counterparts. Optical measurements using time-resolved photoluminescence and steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy are implemented to extract the diffusion coefficients and mobilities of holes in the superlattices at various temperatures from 12 K to 210 K. The sample structure consists of a mid-wave infrared superlattice absorber region grown atop a long-wave infrared superlattice probe region. An ambipolar diffusion model is adopted to extract the hole mobility. The results show that the hole mobility first increases from 0.2 cm2/Vs at 12 K and then levels off at ~50 cm2/Vs as the temperature exceeds ~60 K. An InAs/InAs1-xSbx type-II superlattice nBn long-wavelength barrier infrared photodetector has also been demonstrated with a measured dark current density of 9.5×10-4 A/cm2 and a maximum resistance-area product of 563 Ω-cm2 at 77 K under a bias of -0.5 V. The Arrhenius plot of the dark current density reveals a possible high-operating-temperature of 110 K.The second part of the dissertation reports a lift-off technology using a water-soluble sacrificial MgTe layer grown on InSb. This technique enables the seamless integration of materials with lattice constants near 6.5 Å, such as InSb, CdTe, PbTe, HgTe and Sn. Coherently strained MgTe with a lattice constant close to 6.5 Å acts as a sacrificial layer which reacts with water and releases the film above it. Freestanding CdTe/MgxCd1-xTe double-heterostructures resulting from the lift-off process show increased photoluminescence intensity due to enhanced extraction efficiency and photon-recycling effect. The lifted-off thin films show smooth and flat surfaces with 6.7 Å root-mean-square roughness revealed by atomic-force microscopy profiles. The increased photoluminescence intensity also confirms that the CdTe/MgxCd1-xTe double-heterostructures maintain the high optical quality after epitaxial lift-off.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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An ethnography of moving in Nairobi : b pedestrians, handcarts, minibuses and the vitality of urban mobility

Description

This ethnography follows mobile trajectories on roads in Nairobi to investigate how the transformation of transport infrastructure has affected people’s everyday mobility. I follow diverse mobile actors, including pedestrians, handcart

This ethnography follows mobile trajectories on roads in Nairobi to investigate how the transformation of transport infrastructure has affected people’s everyday mobility. I follow diverse mobile actors, including pedestrians, handcart (mkokoteni) workers, and minibus (matatu) operators, whose practices and ideas of moving are central to understand the city’s ordinary mobility. I also situate their everyday ways of moving in the rules, plans and ideas of regulators, such as government officials, engineers and international experts, who focus on decongesting roads and attempt to reshape Nairobi’s better urban mobility. Despite official and popular aspirations for building new roads and other public transport infrastructure, I argue that many mobile actors still pursue and struggle with preexisting and non-motorized means and notions of moving that are not reflected in the promise of and plans for better mobility. This ethnography also reveals how certain important forms of ordinary mobility have been socially marginalized. It explores what kinds of difficulties are created when the infrastructural blueprints of road “experts” and the notions that politicians promote about a new urban African mobility fail to match the reality of everyday road use by the great majority of Nairobi residents. By employing mobile participant observation of the practices of moving, this study also finds important ethnographic implications and suggestions for the study of mobile subjects in an African city where old and new forms of mobility collide.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016