Matching Items (25)
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Description
The gameplay experience can be understood as an interaction between player and game design characteristics. A greater understanding of these characteristics can be gained through empirical means. Subsequently, an enhanced knowledge of these characteristics should enable the creation of games that effectively generate desirable experiences for players. The purpose of

The gameplay experience can be understood as an interaction between player and game design characteristics. A greater understanding of these characteristics can be gained through empirical means. Subsequently, an enhanced knowledge of these characteristics should enable the creation of games that effectively generate desirable experiences for players. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between gameplay enjoyment and the individual characteristics of gaming goal orientations, game usage, and gender. A total of 301 participants were surveyed and the data were analyzed using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). This led to an expanded Gameplay Enjoyment Model (GEM) with 41 game features, an overarching Enjoyment factor, and 9 specific components, including Challenge, Companionship, Discovery, Fantasy, Fidelity, Identity, Multiplayer, Recognition, and Strategy. Furthermore, the 3x2 educational goal orientation framework was successfully applied to a gaming context. The resulting 3x2 Gaming Goal Orientations (GGO) model consists of 18 statements that describe players' motivations for gaming, which are distributed across the six dimensions of Task-Approach, Task-Avoidance, Self-Approach, Self-Avoidance, Other-Approach, and Other-Avoidance. Lastly, players' individual characteristics were used to predict gameplay enjoyment, which resulted in the formation of the GEM-Individual Characteristics (GEM-IC) model. In GEM-IC, the six GGO dimensions were the strongest predictors. Meanwhile, game usage variables like multiplayer, genre, and platform preference, were minimal to moderate predictors. Although commonly appearing in games research, gender and game time commitment variables failed to predict enjoyment. The results of this study enable important work to be conducted involving game experiences and player characteristics. After several empirical iterations, GEM is considered suitable to employ as a research and design tool. In addition, GGO should be useful to researchers interested in how player motivations relate to gameplay experiences. Moreover, GEM-IC points to several variables that may prove useful in future research. Accordingly, it is posited that researchers will derive more meaningful insights on games and players by investigating detailed, context-specific characteristics as compared to general, demographic ones. Ultimately, it is believed that GEM, GGO, and GEM-IC will be useful tools for researchers and designers who seek to create effective gameplay experiences that meet the needs of players.
ContributorsQuick, John (Author) / Atkinson, Robert (Thesis advisor) / McNamara, Danielle (Committee member) / Nelson, Brian (Committee member) / Savenye, Wilhelmina (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2013
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Description
During the first half of the last decade, there was a heated debate regarding what type of critical approach best suits the study of video games. Those who argued for approaches traditionally associated with narrative studies were primarily interested in video games as a new frontier for storytelling. The opposition

During the first half of the last decade, there was a heated debate regarding what type of critical approach best suits the study of video games. Those who argued for approaches traditionally associated with narrative studies were primarily interested in video games as a new frontier for storytelling. The opposition claimed that video games are not systems for storytelling, and that applying literature and film theories to video games dismisses the interactive nature of video games as games. The argument was bitter, but ended abruptly with no clear results or consensus. Yet are narratology and ludology, the two proposed critical theories, so disparate that the use of one means the exclusion of the other? This paper suggests the possibility that narratology and ludology share more in common than critics have thus far realized. Both games and story share themes of conflict, and in focalizing on the antagonist of single-player video games it becomes possible to trace the development of conflict and how it functions in the video game medium. In analyzing antagonists and the conflict they embody, it becomes apparent that narratology and ludology are not so incompatible in their methodologies and assumptions. Finally, because video games themselves are a multifaceted medium, it is only appropriate that critics use multiple theoretical approaches in their analysis to broaden critical knowledge of how the medium functions.
ContributorsNeel, James (Author) / Hayes, Elisabeth (Thesis advisor) / Gee, James P (Committee member) / Daer, Alice (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2012
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Description
Instead of providing the illusion of agency to a reader via a tree or network of prewritten, branching paths, an interactive story should treat the reader as a player who has meaningful influence on the story. An interactive story can accomplish this task by giving the player a large toolset

Instead of providing the illusion of agency to a reader via a tree or network of prewritten, branching paths, an interactive story should treat the reader as a player who has meaningful influence on the story. An interactive story can accomplish this task by giving the player a large toolset for expression in the plot. LudoNarrare, an engine for interactive storytelling, puts "verbs" in this toolset. Verbs are contextual choices of action given to agents in a story that result in narrative events. This paper begins with an analysis and statement of the problem of creating interactive stories. From here, various attempts to solve this problem, ranging from commercial video games to academic research, are given a brief overview to give context to what paths have already been forged. With the background set, the model of interactive storytelling that the research behind LudoNarrare led to is exposed in detail. The section exploring this model contains explanations on what storyworlds are and how they are structured. It then discusses the way these storyworlds can be brought to life. The exposition on the LudoNarrare model finally wraps up by considering the way storyworlds created around this model can be designed. After the concepts of LudoNarrare are explored in the abstract, the story of the engine's research and development and the specifics of its software implementation are given. With LudoNarrare fully explained, the focus then turns to plans for evaluation of its quality in terms of entertainment value, robustness, and performance. To conclude, possible further paths of investigation for LudoNarrare and its model of interactive storytelling are proposed to inspire those who wish to continue in the spirit of the project.
ContributorsStark, Joshua Matthew (Author) / VanLehn, Kurt (Thesis director) / Wetzel, Jon (Committee member) / Computer Science and Engineering Program (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2015-12
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Description
With the increasing popularity of video games and the emergence of game streaming brought about by platforms such as Youtube and Twitch, combined with the multitude of ways to learn how to code from schools and online resources including Codecademy and Treehouse, game development has become incredibly approachable. Yet that

With the increasing popularity of video games and the emergence of game streaming brought about by platforms such as Youtube and Twitch, combined with the multitude of ways to learn how to code from schools and online resources including Codecademy and Treehouse, game development has become incredibly approachable. Yet that does not mean it is simple. Developing a game requires a substantial amount of work, even before a design is considered worth making into a complete game. Over the course of this thesis, I created eight designs with accompanying prototypes. Only one was made into a fully functional release. I sought to make a game with a great design while increasing my understanding of game development and the code needed to finish a game. I came out realizing that I was in over my head. With the amount of work involved in creating an entire game, iteration is key to finding an idea that is capable of becoming a game that feels complete and enjoyable. A game's design must be fleshed out before technical work can truly begin, yet the design can take nearly as much time and effort as the code. In this thesis, each design is detailed and associated with why it seemed great and why it was replaced, with extra focus on the final design and how players felt about it. These designs are followed by what I learned about game development over the course of the thesis, including both the technical and emotional sides of developing a video game.
ContributorsCharnell, Zachary Andrew (Author) / Olson, Loren (Thesis director) / Amresh, Ashish (Committee member) / School of Arts, Media and Engineering (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2015-12
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Description
Snipers and Skyscrapers is a new take on the tabletop role-playing game experience that attempts to simplify the typical TRPG formula for a stronger gaming experience. S&S lowers the barrier to entry for new players, streamlines the combat system, and increases immersion for a stronger role-playing experience without sacrificing the

Snipers and Skyscrapers is a new take on the tabletop role-playing game experience that attempts to simplify the typical TRPG formula for a stronger gaming experience. S&S lowers the barrier to entry for new players, streamlines the combat system, and increases immersion for a stronger role-playing experience without sacrificing the depth of its more complicated counterparts.
ContributorsPearl, Carter Alexander (Author) / Facinelli, Diane (Thesis director) / Rezza, Catherine (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Department of Psychology (Contributor)
Created2014-05
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Description
AZMagicPlayers.com is a website dedicated to the promotion of the Wizards of the Coast-trading card game Magic: the Gathering in Arizona. This paper details the business model that helps sustain the website and how that business model is designed specifically to help build the community and ultimately fulfill the mission

AZMagicPlayers.com is a website dedicated to the promotion of the Wizards of the Coast-trading card game Magic: the Gathering in Arizona. This paper details the business model that helps sustain the website and how that business model is designed specifically to help build the community and ultimately fulfill the mission statement of AZMagicPlayers.com.
ContributorsAbong, Jason (Co-author) / Abong, Jeffrey (Co-author) / Eaton, John (Thesis director) / Olsen, Douglas (Committee member) / Regalado, Marco (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Department of Marketing (Contributor)
Created2013-05
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Description
This paper explores the use of different classroom management styles by teachers engaged in a study. The study was focused on testing an educational computer program called The Doctor's Cure in s southwester school district with ready access to computers. The Doctor's Cure uses interactive storytelling and transformational play to

This paper explores the use of different classroom management styles by teachers engaged in a study. The study was focused on testing an educational computer program called The Doctor's Cure in s southwester school district with ready access to computers. The Doctor's Cure uses interactive storytelling and transformational play to teach seventh graders how to write persuasively. The definitions of student centered and teacher centered management styles used in this paper are drawn from Garret (2008) which suggests that teachers are not entirely one management style or the other, but a mix of the two. This paper closely examines three teachers, two with teacher centered styles and one with a student centered style in order to see which style was most effective in promoting the learning of persuasive writing skills. The findings tentatively indicate that teacher centered management styles yield larger gains in learning compared to more student centered styles.
ContributorsAyala, Joel Nicholas (Author) / Hayes, Elisabeth (Thesis director) / Siyahhan, Sinem (Committee member) / Holmes, Jeff (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Harrington Bioengineering Program (Contributor)
Created2013-05
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Description
Smartphones have become increasingly common over the past few years, and mobile games continue to be the most common type of application (Apple, Inc., 2013). For many people, the social aspect of gaming is very important, and thus most mobile games include support for playing with multiple players. However, there

Smartphones have become increasingly common over the past few years, and mobile games continue to be the most common type of application (Apple, Inc., 2013). For many people, the social aspect of gaming is very important, and thus most mobile games include support for playing with multiple players. However, there is a lack of common knowledge about which implementation of this functionality is most favorable from a development standpoint. In this study, we evaluate three different types of multiplayer gameplay (pass-and-play, Bluetooth, and GameCenter) via development cost and user interviews. We find that pass-and-play, the most easily-implemented mode, is not favored by players due to its inconvenience. We also find that GameCenter is not as well favored as expected due to latency of GameCenter's servers, and that Bluetooth multiplayer is the most well favored for social play due to its similarity to real-life play. Despite there being a large overhead in developing and testing Bluetooth and GameCenter multiplayer due to Apple's development process, this is irrelevant since professional developers must enroll in this process anyway. Therefore, the most effective multiplayer mode to develop is mostly determined by whether Internet play is desirable: Bluetooth if not, GameCenter if so. Future studies involving more complete development work and more types of multiplayer modes could yield more promising results.
ContributorsBradley, Michael Robert (Author) / Collofello, James (Thesis director) / Wilkerson, Kelly (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences (Contributor) / Computer Science and Engineering Program (Contributor)
Created2013-12
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Description
The thesis document describes in detail the decision making process and research that went into each step in the process of designing, coding, launching, and marketing a mobile game. This includes major challenges and methodologies for overcoming them or changing course as well as significant revisions that were made to

The thesis document describes in detail the decision making process and research that went into each step in the process of designing, coding, launching, and marketing a mobile game. This includes major challenges and methodologies for overcoming them or changing course as well as significant revisions that were made to the game upon receiving market and user feedback. The game, Sheep In Space, was launched on to the Windows Phone 8 marketplace initially via the use of the GameMaker: Studio game engine. From there, following a series of revisions Sheep In Space launched on the Android marketplace and has been undergoing further changes before the final launch to iOS. The revision and launch strategy was determined based off of market feedback from a variety of facets, including direct word of mouth, reviews, downloads, analytics data, and social media reaction.
Created2014-12
Description

Video games are packed full of endless potential. They are the telling of impossible narratives with something for every type of person. So then why has the industry historically been one of the worst for representations of race and gender? In this thesis, I define "good" media representation and engage

Video games are packed full of endless potential. They are the telling of impossible narratives with something for every type of person. So then why has the industry historically been one of the worst for representations of race and gender? In this thesis, I define "good" media representation and engage in the analysis of both Overwatch (2016) and Detroit Become Human (2018) to observe the ways these two video games, which so outwardly market their diversity, have failed marginalized groups. Accompanying the research paper is a video game poster representing a woman of color designed by the author which is meant to learn from the mistakes of its predecessors.

ContributorsBateman, Phoebe Jasmine (Author) / Dove-Viebahn, Aviva (Thesis director) / Holmes, Jeffrey (Committee member) / School of Humanities, Arts, and Cultural Studies (Contributor) / Department of English (Contributor) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor)
Created2021-05