Matching Items (67)

Rio Salado Project History

Description

The Rio Salado Project began in the College of Architecture in the fall of 1966 when Dean James Elmore proposed to the studio faculty "Let's do something with the (Salt)

The Rio Salado Project began in the College of Architecture in the fall of 1966 when Dean James Elmore proposed to the studio faculty "Let's do something with the (Salt) River." This is a collection of videos describing the progress of the project since students presented their work over 50 years ago. The most prominent development is the Tempe Town Lake.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 1995-10-01

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ASU Farmers Market

Description

The implementation of a farmers market on the Arizona State University Tempe campus would benefit student helath, the local community, and the environment. A 2009 survey of university students states

The implementation of a farmers market on the Arizona State University Tempe campus would benefit student helath, the local community, and the environment. A 2009 survey of university students states that "over 60 percent [of students] eat two or fewer servings of fruits and vegetables a day," which falls below the health standard. A campus farmers market would give students easier access to fresh produce. Through purchasing products from local vendors, students will establish better connections with the community while supporting the local economy. In addition, farmers markets encourage sustainable practices. According to a survey conducted by Farmers Markets Today, "85% of farmers market vendors traveled fewer than 50 miles to sell at a famers market [while]... nationwide, food travels an average of 1,500 miles before reaching its consumer." Thus, greenhouse gas emissions can be significantly reduced through purchasing local products. The purposes of a campus farmers market act in conjunction with ASU's intentions to become a New American University, which values students' well-being, the local community, and sustainability.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2010-05

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Exploring Students' Engagement With and Construction of Community

Description

Sense of Community is related to numerous positive outcomes for university students. The purpose of this study was to explore sense of community amongst low income students who received a

Sense of Community is related to numerous positive outcomes for university students. The purpose of this study was to explore sense of community amongst low income students who received a last dollar scholarship. This study also sought to understand how students define community and how they interact with communities from their past (before university), present (since they started college), and how they envision their future community involvement after graduation. Through purposive sampling, six low income Arizona State University students were selected based on similar characteristics. The scholarship that they belong to selects them based on financial need, integrity, and prolonged commitment to community service. Using a qualitative narrative inquiry, I interviewed participants about their understanding and experiences with communities. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis. Based on the analysis, I identified three major themes: community as construction, community as nonlinear, and community as intersectional. Drawing from participants' definitions and experiences of community, I argue that community is a construction. In other words, individuals create their own constructions of community, and their actions vary based on that construction. Participants also experience their communities intersectionally, that is individual's experience their communities as coexisting and through multiple community perspectives, rather than as a single stand-alone entity. Finally, community does not exist as part of a linear time paradigm. Instead community is experienced in terms of relevance to the individual in creating meaning from that community. In addition to the above themes, I also examined participant perspectives of ASU as a community. Based on this research, I recommend that a platform be provided for students to engage in a dialogue about their understanding of community and interactions with communities. Moreover, I suggest researchers utilize intersectionality, constructionism, and non-linear time to frame future research on sense of community. This research is significant because it helps us understand student engagement, and offers a framework through which universities can provide students an opportunity to better understand their own sense of community.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Am I a Feminist?: Discussing Self-Identity of Latina College Women Through the Lens of Feminist Theory

Description

This thesis project had three key components. First, we performed an extensive literature review of different types of feminist theories to better understand the scope of their definitions. We also

This thesis project had three key components. First, we performed an extensive literature review of different types of feminist theories to better understand the scope of their definitions. We also reviewed several articles that examined how women, especially Latinas, seek to understand and negotiate their identity as feminists. Second, we conducted qualitative interviews with Latina college women in which they shared their college experiences, their thoughts on feminism, and how they believe the cultural values they were brought up with play a role in both. Finally, we developed a 12-minute documentary film containing excerpts from participants’ interviews that reflected a number of core themes. We invited participants to view the documentary and contribute to a post-film conversation with interested faculty members and students. The interactive post-film conversation served as a reflection and expansion of the themes in the film and challenged those that participated to explore avenues of resolution through family and communication.
The motivation for this project came from a place of reflection for what it means to be a feminist and Latina and how to navigate the values of both without compromising one over the other. After personally contemplating the meanings and process without coming to a concrete understanding, we were prompted to branch out and engage other Latina college students in a conversation about what it means for them, what unique challenges they may be facing, and how they may be seeking to answer questions surrounding their identity.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Community Music Therapy for Cultural Cohesion

Description

Community Music Therapy for Cultural Cohesion is the name of the research initiative to create a community music therapy program that addresses community attitudes toward cultural diversity. The program created

Community Music Therapy for Cultural Cohesion is the name of the research initiative to create a community music therapy program that addresses community attitudes toward cultural diversity. The program created is titled "Many Peoples, One Voice." Theories and findings in the field of social psychology regarding the formation of intergroup bias and how to prevent it from taking hold inform the goals of the program. Current practices in and theories on community music therapy inform the content, qualities, and perspective of the program. Information from the field of ethnomusicology inform the specific world music traditions incorporated into the program. The culmination of this research and the program it birthed is described in detail to promote a better understanding of the goals, activities, cultural handouts, additional content considerations, and structure of the program as well as the populations it may serve and the adaptions it may include. Finally, the program is related to the current trends in the field of music therapy and its potential to expand into nontraditional need and population areas is considered.

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Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Youth Perceptions of Law Enforcement

Description

The way the public perceives law enforcement influences how communities function. Identifying how individuals develop their perceptions of law enforcement is critically important. Mainly, their experiences with officers determine how

The way the public perceives law enforcement influences how communities function. Identifying how individuals develop their perceptions of law enforcement is critically important. Mainly, their experiences with officers determine how perceptions of law enforcement are developed. Analyzing perceptions of law enforcement can help people understand relationships that officers have with community members and determine the type of impact that officers have on certain populations such as the youth. This study examines youth perceptions of law enforcement. The youths’ perception of police is an important perception to analyze. It is important because their perceptions have the power to create change or influence other people their age. It has been seen that the youth “create meaningful institutional change in their communities”. The research and findings on perceptions of law enforcement are important because they could help explain whether there is a correlation between crime rates in the community and perceptions of law enforcement from community members. It can also help identify how much the youth population is willing to rely on law enforcement and whether they trust and respect them. The youth are exposed to factors in their community that can influence certain attitudes and perspectives. In this research, a study from Elementary schools in Compton, CA is analyzed to identify youth perceptions of law enforcement. The research questions addressed are: Is there any correlation between crime rates in the community and perceptions of law enforcement? Can a program implemented into schools improve youth perceptions of law enforcement? How much are the youth willing to rely on law enforcement?

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Formulation of Logic Model & Evaluation Plan for CPLC Insurance Program: A Collaboration Between Chicanos Por La Causa and the C.A.R.E. Program at the T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University

Description

There is a widespread inequality in health care access and insured rates suffered by the Latino, Spanish-speaking population in Arizona, resulting in poor health measures and economic burden. The passage

There is a widespread inequality in health care access and insured rates suffered by the Latino, Spanish-speaking population in Arizona, resulting in poor health measures and economic burden. The passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 provided mechanisms to alleviate this disparity, however, many Latino communities lack accessible information and means to gain access to health insurance enrollment. Chicanos Por La Causa (CPLC) is a community based organizing that provides many services to low-income communities across Arizona, one of which is the CPLC Insurance Program. In collaboration with the Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) at Arizona State University, the program was studied to help address the need of a LOGIC model and evaluation plan to determine its effectiveness. Interviews with three executives within CPLC were conducted in conjunction with a literature review to determine the inputs, strategies, outputs, and outcomes of the LOGIC model that drive CPLC Insurance's mission. Evaluation measures were then created to provide the necessary quantitative data that can best show to what degree the program is achieving its goals. Specifically, the results indicated the key outcomes that drive the LOGIC model, and an evaluation plan designed to provide indicators of these outcomes was produced. The implications of this study are that the suggested data collection can verify how effectively the program's actions are creating positive change, as well as show where further improvements may be necessary to maximize effectiveness.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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KnowU: A Study on the Undergraduate Arts, Media, and Engineering Student Community

Description

This study explores the results of an event hosted for undergraduate students in the Arts, Media and Engineering (AME) department at Arizona State University. 18 students were asked to sit

This study explores the results of an event hosted for undergraduate students in the Arts, Media and Engineering (AME) department at Arizona State University. 18 students were asked to sit and eat lunch with one another and share their opinions on personal and school-related topics. A follow-up survey consisting of eight questions was sent out to gauge how effective this event was in getting students to build stronger relationships with each other. Statistical analysis showed that 89% of students who attended would participate again and consider collaborating with another student at the event in future projects. From these results, a series of future interventions like the one mentioned in this paper could promote stronger relationships among students and add value to the department. A positive response from the students who participated could imply that students might be more inclined to reach out to classmates when in a setting made for that purpose.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

Reclamation: A movement-based exploration of the individual and collective narrative of apology in women

Description

Personal experiences with body image dysmorphia and an eating disorder necessitated that I do a thorough investigation into why they happened and why I felt this way about my body.

Personal experiences with body image dysmorphia and an eating disorder necessitated that I do a thorough investigation into why they happened and why I felt this way about my body. For this project, not only was I motivated by my own struggles, but I noticed that these experiences were shared among my family, my friends, and my fellow peers in the dance community. We had been struggling since childhood. I began to realize that these behaviors and thought patterns were manifestations of apology, an apology that women have been learning, living, and spreading since our beginnings. Why do women apologize? How does this apology affect how we view, treat, and navigate our bodies in space? In what ways can dance be the mechanism by which we remove apology and individually and collectively find joy, freedom, and liberation? Not only was I interested in understanding the ‘why’, but I was deeply interested in finding a solution. Research for this thesis came from written materials, stories that the dancers and I shared, and choreographic research in the body. The final goal was to create a community-based performance of dance, spoken word, and storytelling that demonstrated the findings from each of those questions and catalyzed a conversation about how we can liberate ourselves. We used rehearsals to explore our own experiences within apology and shame, while also exploring how the ways in which we practice being unapologetic in the dance space can translate to how we move through the world on a daily basis.

Through a deep analysis and application of Sonya Renee Taylor’s book The Body Is Not An Apology, I discovered that apology is learned. We learn how to apologize through body shame, the media, family/generational trauma, and government/law/policy. This apology is embodied through gestures, movement patterns, and postures, such as bowing the head, hunching the shoulders, and walking around others. Apology causes us to view our bodies as things to be manipulated, discarded, and embarrassed by. After recognizing why we apologize and how it affects our bodies, we can then begin to think of how to remove it. Because the body the site of the problem, it is also the site of the solution. Dance gives us an opportunity to deeply learn our bodies, to cultivate their power, and to heal from their traumas. By being together in community as women, we are able to feel seen and supported as we work through uncharted territory of being free from apology in these bodies. By dancing in ways that allow us to take up space, to be free, to be unapologetic, we use dance as a practice for life. Through transforming ourselves, we begin to transform the world and rewrite the narrative of how we exist in and move through our bodies as women.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05