Matching Items (23)

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Christian Beliefs Surrounding End of Life Care

Description

Spirituality is of paramount importance in end of life care yet this aspect of care is frequently unrecognized. Spiritual and religious needs are often not accurately assessed or understood. This

Spirituality is of paramount importance in end of life care yet this aspect of care is frequently unrecognized. Spiritual and religious needs are often not accurately assessed or understood. This study sought to investigate Christian end of life beliefs and needs. A qualitative study design was used to explore end of life beliefs and needs of members from a non-denominational Christian church who self-declared their Christianity. A 10-item Assessment Tool on end of life needs and beliefs was created by this investigator and used in the study (Appendix 1). A total of 14 participants were interviewed. Notes and audio recordings were taken and later transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis including an open analysis and an axial analysis of the data. The open analysis identified trends and common concepts which were then categorized into broader themes during the axial analysis. Findings included several major themes that described the Christian population's end of life needs and beliefs. The major themes identified included: trust in God, beliefs about necessity of religious practices, lack of fear of death, similarities in religious rituals and practices, and a desire for quality of life. During a statistical analysis, findings revealed that 86% believed that pain and suffering should be treated and prevented. One hundred percent (100%) of the participants reported that their faith helped with their acceptance of death. An additional 64% stated that they did not fear death. The findings in this study can improve religious and cultural awareness for nurses and others in the healthcare field.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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PRISONERS OF OUR OWN DESIGN: EXPLORING THE NATURE-CIVILIZATION DICHOTOMY'S EMOTIONAL IMPACT ON PACIFIC CREST TRAIL THRU-HIKERS

Description

While many report positive changes after completing a long distance hike on the PCT, many who return experience a sense of depression or intense sadness. This sadness can be debilitating,

While many report positive changes after completing a long distance hike on the PCT, many who return experience a sense of depression or intense sadness. This sadness can be debilitating, but very little research has been done to explore possible causes and remedies. This thesis argues that volatile environmental conditions on the Pacific Crest Trail act in a similar way to that of entities such as fraternities and the military in that the effort required to be initiated must be justified with the value received. As such, thru-hikers increase the value of the trail for themselves along with the cultural values that the trail may hold. These cultural values are predominantly equality, liberty, and the concept of the sublime. However, as nature is understood to be the opposite of urban environments, urban environments take on qualities of inequality, oppression, and corruption in the eyes of the hiker. These qualities then cause a hiker distress upon returning from their six month journey in that they have to both exist in and participate with such a society.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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The Self, The Other, and The Lord

Description

What is the foundation of love? This study will address the question of whether fear of God or love of God is the real motivation for charity in human interaction,

What is the foundation of love? This study will address the question of whether fear of God or love of God is the real motivation for charity in human interaction, while perhaps equating the two terms more than might be initially evident. I will argue for a theistic understanding of love, advocating for the idea that humans can be selfless when their view of humanity is aligned with God’s view of us. Functioning from a largely Christian perspective, the paper will explore the implications asserted by all the world’s great religions that divine love itself can inspire charitable human conduct. I will argue that it is not in fact fear for our own salvation that causes religion to motivate us. Rather, it is the realization that ethical action is truly possible through the power of a divine love that draws all creation back unto itself. Using the Gospels of the New Testament, the work of Homer, Dorothy Day, and Pope John Paul II, among others, I will make a case for divine love as the necessary (although often invisible) foundation for human charity.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Information Measurement Theory as an Introduction to Zen Buddhism

Description

Information Measurement Theory (IMT) is a decision-making system developed by ASU's Dr. Dean Kashiwagi that emphasizes the inefficiencies caused by decision-making and personal bias. Zen Buddhism is an ancient philosophical

Information Measurement Theory (IMT) is a decision-making system developed by ASU's Dr. Dean Kashiwagi that emphasizes the inefficiencies caused by decision-making and personal bias. Zen Buddhism is an ancient philosophical system designed to reduce life's suffering. IMT introduces readers to common-sense notions which are spun into more complex topics that reveal flaws in our normal modes of thinking. This style is often employed by Buddhist teachers, and the rigidly logical structure of IMT already proves many points tangent to Buddhist philosophy. In my thesis, I have exploited the similarities of IMT and Zen Buddhism to create a website introducing curious Western readers to the beauty of Zen in a refreshingly frank manner. This project will demonstrate the power of information theory and dominant communication to break down barriers towards understanding. Ultimately, this should offer an exciting new path for prospective students of Zen and help to build understanding between ideologically disparate groups.

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Date Created
  • 2015-05

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What Am I That Is That?

Description

This paper explores the question, "What if we extended to our own being the aspiration of well-being and flourishing that we strive for in our sustainability work?" I offer my

This paper explores the question, "What if we extended to our own being the aspiration of well-being and flourishing that we strive for in our sustainability work?" I offer my findings as a reflective essay, lightly grounded in autoethnographic methods, that presents as a persuasive essay. The intention is to deliver an offering for a new (old) state of being.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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C A N V A S: A film

Description

C A N V A S is a film both compellingly honest and relevant. Spanning five countries, we find ourselves immersed within three unique stories each reflecting the reality of

C A N V A S is a film both compellingly honest and relevant. Spanning five countries, we find ourselves immersed within three unique stories each reflecting the reality of pain: a humanitarian weighing the realities of injustice, a mother, grieving the loss of her daughter, and a musician pondering the absence of his father. Immersed in these narratives is a vulnerable truth by which all can relate, and we begin to see the colors of a painter at work. Stroked in both suffering and healing, can we learn to trust our artist? C A N V A S tells a story that can touch us all.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Christian Ministries and Their Impact on College Student Wellness

Description

College and university students are heavily influenced by their exposure to opportunities, individuals, and belief-systems during their time in school. More specifically, countless students are impacted by campus Christian ministries.

College and university students are heavily influenced by their exposure to opportunities, individuals, and belief-systems during their time in school. More specifically, countless students are impacted by campus Christian ministries. There are 67 registered religious clubs and organizations across Arizona State University's four campuses, and 46 of them identify as Christian. Similar to most faith-based organizations, Christian campus ministries seek to impact the lives of students. This study will take a look at the influence of these ministries at ASU by researching their intersection with another key component of university life: wellness.
The primary research question is, “How does involvement in Christian ministries at ASU relate to the wellness of students?” The study will examine multiple dimensions of wellness: occupational, physical, social, intellectual, spiritual, and emotional. Each component is essential to understanding the health and well-being of an individual, which is why this study will measure wellness levels in each dimension among samples of students at ASU.
The methodology chosen was a short, anonymous survey that 148 ASU students participated in—73 involved in Christian ministries at ASU and 75 not involved. The quantitative component included a wellness assessment using questions from The National Wellness Institute. These wellness scale questions were broken up into 5 randomized sections, each with one question per dimension, for 30 questions total. Each question response was assigned a rating on a 1 to 5 scale, 1 associated with low wellness and 5 high wellness. The qualitative component, comprised of short answer questions, only applied to students who were involved in a Christian ministry. This portion allowed respondents to explain if and how the ministry impacts each dimension of wellness uniquely.
The quantitative results showed some evident differences between students involved in Christian ministries and students not involved. The social and spiritual dimensions concluded much higher levels of wellness for involved students, both statistically significant with p-values of 0.028 and 0.004. Although some of the wellness differences between involved and not involved participants were not statistically significant, there is also notable variation among questions within each dimension. For the qualitative data, most students in Christian ministries said they believe their involvement increases their wellness in all six dimensions. For each dimension, over 75% of participants said that the ministry impacted their well-being. For the social, spiritual, and emotional dimensions, at least 97% of respondents said their ministry involvement impacted their wellness.
In examining the conclusions of the study, one recommendations is to strengthen the partnership between the greater ASU community and Christian ministries by collaborating and combining resources for programming that relates to their common goals and shared values. Additionally, other faith-based organizations at ASU may benefit from replicating this study to observe their unique wellness impact.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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PURE, Poems and Prose by: Grant Wallace

Description

In September of 1540 Garcia Lopez de Cardenas, while being led by Hopi Natives, came across something no European had ever seen before. One can only imagine what must have

In September of 1540 Garcia Lopez de Cardenas, while being led by Hopi Natives, came across something no European had ever seen before. One can only imagine what must have gone through his mind as he discovered the world’s largest canyon, 18 miles across and close to 6,000 feet deep. Over the course of three days, Garcia and his scouts made attempts to enter into the canyon and to taste of its river, but, after many failed attempts, they had to make their way back to their main camp for fear of dehydration and it was left unvisited by any Europeans for over 200 years.

Now I wasn’t the first one to discover the canyon, but I remember a time when I was in the fourth grade. When I stepped out of a bus that I had been in for close to four hours and took forty footsteps to end up at a small brick wall that came close to calf-height which was meant to keep me safe. I don’t know why it didn’t hit me until this point, because I had seen pictures of its grandeur and “experienced” the so called “majesty” of the Grand Canyon through the medium of the National Geographic and tasted of the beauty of one of the natural wonders of the world through the photographs of others before, but standing face to face with a five-thousand-foot cliff humbled me and brought a fear in to me that I can’t describe. Especially when a friend of mine had violently jerked me while I was close to the edge. I remember hearing fear in my father’s voice as I got a little too close to the edge for his comfort. He wanted me to be safe, but I wanted to look this canyon in the eye.
I find it really interesting though, that both my father and I feared ME getting close to the edge. I guess it’s because we both didn’t fully trust my young and feeble knees to keep me stable while I was that close to a fall that would’ve meant sure death for me. Or maybe it was because a couple of months before this, he had seen on the news that some kid was playing too close to the edge and had fallen to his death. Or maybe, it was because, for the first time, death was actually close enough to grasp something he profoundly loved. Either way, I won’t ever forget the loving strain in his voice as he sternly said “Grant! Step a little bit further back from the edge Son.”

It’s really a shame that no one knew. Or at least that no one said anything if they did know. Especially because this New canyon I stood looking face to face with was thousands of feet deeper than the one I had been close to the edge of ten years before, and had the authority to not just kill me once, but twice, if I fell.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Alien Play: A Full-Length Play on Mental Illness, Spirituality, and Extra-Terrestrials

Description

The Alien Play, as posted here, is a placeholder name for this working draft of a full-length stage play that functions as part-science-fiction adventure, part-spiritual-parable. As the process of playwriting

The Alien Play, as posted here, is a placeholder name for this working draft of a full-length stage play that functions as part-science-fiction adventure, part-spiritual-parable. As the process of playwriting is a complex array of research, outlining, drafting, revising and editing, the play is preceded by a craft essay detailing the playwright's inspiration, research, and narrative design. In order to complete this project, the playwright conducted research in the field of religious studies, focusing specifically on the phenomena of paranormal experiences through the lenses of psychology, sociology, and philosophy, asking questions such as: How and why do new religions arise? In what ways (narrative, content, structure, etc.) do these new religions reflect the spiritualist mythologies or religious institutions of the past? What do these similarities or differences say about the social, economic, or political atmospheres that give rise to such movements?

More specifically, this play works within the cross-section of religion/spirituality, mental illness, and UFO and other extra-terrestrial related anomalies to ask such questions as: What does it mean to be Human? What does it mean to be "alien" or Other? How do we internally and externally construct a binary between Humanness and Otherness, between Self and Other? How do we construct reality? In what ways does this anthropomorphize our conceptions of the Human or the Other? In what ways, specifically, may this affect our understanding or manifestation of mental illness, in ourself and others?

The play you see here is a final draft for the thesis, but is still in development elsewhere. Here is a brief log line (i.e. a short description of the general plot and conflict of a script) for the piece: Four sisters from a broken home must deal with the sudden discovery of their late father's communication with an extra-terrestrial race bearing a message of Love-and-Peace. When they, too, begin to communicate with the E.T.'s, they must juggle issues of mental illness, memory, and trauma all while outrunning a shadow government that will stop at nothing to uncover their secret.

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Date Created
  • 2018-12