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Arizona Nurses Association Member Involvement in Public Policy

Description

The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge

The purpose of the study was to determine the level and type of public policy involvement among registered nurses (RN) who are members of the Arizona Nurses Association (AzNA). Furthermore, the aim of the study was to identify the knowledge base and motivation of nurses and their involvement in public policy as well as the barriers and benefits. A 20- item survey was sent to all of the members of AzNA. There were 39 responses used in the analysis. The highest reported public policy activities in which the nurses had participated were: voted (90%), contacted a public official (51%), and gave money to a campaign or for a public policy concern (46%). Lack of time was the most frequently reported barrier to involvement and improving the health of the public was the most frequently reported benefit to involvement. The number of public policy education/information sources and the highest level of education positively correlate to the nurses' total number of public policy activities (r = .627 p <0.05; r = .504, p <0.05). Based on the results of stepwise linear regression analysis, the participants' age, number of education/information sources, and efficacy expectation predict 68.8% of involvement in public policy activities. The greater the number of education/information sources, the greater the number of public policy activities nurses report having participated in.

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Date Created
2015-12

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Promoting Self-Care Towards Resiliency and Well-Being: Addressing Burnout Among Mental Health Workers

Description

Purpose: To assess the burnout levels of mental health workers and to evaluate the effectiveness
of promoting self-care practices in improving their well-being and resiliency.
Background and Significance: Burnout is highly prevalent among mental health workers due to
the nature

Purpose: To assess the burnout levels of mental health workers and to evaluate the effectiveness
of promoting self-care practices in improving their well-being and resiliency.
Background and Significance: Burnout is highly prevalent among mental health workers due to
the nature of their work and the population of patients they serve. Turnover has been a
significant problem within this specialty for decades. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the
mental health workforce was projected to experience shortage by 2025. The pandemic will likely
worsen this. Evidence from literature supports the effectiveness of promoting self-care towards
the development of resiliency and well-being in addressing burnout among healthcare workers.
Methods: The Maslach Burnout Inventory – Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) was used to
assess the burnout levels of mental health workers in a psychiatric hospital in Arizona pre- and
post-intervention. Educational modules were provided for each participant to review. They were
asked to perform at least one self-care activity and to utilize the tools in the Provider Resilience
application every week for four weeks.
Results: Pre-intervention surveys indicated moderate levels of emotional exhaustion (m=20.71)
and depersonalization (m=9.29) and high levels of personal accomplishment (m=28.71).
Improvements were seen on emotional exhaustion (m=18.86), depersonalization (m=6.43), and
personal accomplishment (m=33.86) were seen post-intervention.
Conclusion: Although the results were not statistically significant due to small sample size, the
improvements seen on two out of three components of burnout (emotional exhaustion and
depersonalization) indicated that awareness of burnout levels and self-care practices contribute to
improving the well-being of mental health workers.

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Created

Date Created
2021-04-26

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Preschool Teacher Training on Trauma and Resilience

Description

Childhood traumatic experiences are a prevalent public health issue. Children exposed to trauma
often exhibit behaviors that make educating them challenging. Preschool teachers at a
southwestern United States preschool receive no training related to childhood trauma and
resilience. The purpose

Childhood traumatic experiences are a prevalent public health issue. Children exposed to trauma
often exhibit behaviors that make educating them challenging. Preschool teachers at a
southwestern United States preschool receive no training related to childhood trauma and
resilience. The purpose of this project was to educate preschool teachers on trauma and
resilience to improve attitude related to educating children with trauma. Following Arizona State
University Internal Review Board approval, preschool teachers were recruited from a non-profit
metropolitan preschool. Project included two pre-training questionnaires (Adult Resilience
Measure-Revised [ARM-R] and Attitudes Related to Trauma Informed Care scale [ARTIC]),
one two-hour training via Zoom on childhood trauma and resilience, and post-training ARTIC
questionnaire at two and six weeks. Seven teachers (n=7) participated in pre-training
questionnaires, and three of these teachers (n=3) participated in both post-training
questionnaires. All participating teachers were female and Caucasian. Average age of
participants was 49.43 years (SD=8.40, range 36-60), and experience average was 17.17 years
(SD=10.15, range 3-30). AMR-R average score was 72.29 (SD=8.28, range 61-83). Pre-training
ARTIC score average was 3.87 (SD=0.16). Post-training ARTIC scores at two weeks and six
weeks post-training were 3.65 (SD=0.22) and 3.86 (SD=0.25). Clinical significance included
improved teacher awareness of childhood trauma and improved ability to interact with children
exposed to trauma. Teachers exhibited high resilience scores. Additional research needed
related to further address educating preschool teachers related to trauma informed care, related to
building resilience in children, and related to the impact of teacher resilience on trauma informed
care.

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Created

Date Created
2021-04-12

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Resilience-Oriented Education on Secondary Trauma: Impacts on Secondary Traumatic Stress Scores among Psychiatric Registered Nurses

Description

Secondary traumatic stress (STS) is the natural, consequent behaviors and emotions that result from the individual’s knowledge about traumatizing events experienced by another. Psychiatric registered nurses (RN), due to the nature of their jobs, are frequently exposed to significant amount

Secondary traumatic stress (STS) is the natural, consequent behaviors and emotions that result from the individual’s knowledge about traumatizing events experienced by another. Psychiatric registered nurses (RN), due to the nature of their jobs, are frequently exposed to significant amount of secondary trauma during nurse-patient interactions. Secondary traumatic stress impacts the physical and emotional health of the nurse, compromises patient outcomes and organizational success. Evidence acknowledges the significant extent of secondary traumatic stress among nurses and is insistent on the necessity for effective interventions to mitigate the impacts of secondary trauma on healthcare professionals. A review of literature suggests that knowledge is a protective factor against secondary traumatic stress, and that nurse resilience also moderates the effects of secondary trauma and other work related stressors. These findings have led to the initiation of an evidence-based project that seeks to assess the efficacy of a resilience-oriented educational intervention in decreasing secondary traumatic stress scores and improving resilience among hospital-based psychiatric registered nurses. This project was guided by the Theory of Cognitive Appraisal and Rosswurm and Larabee’s model for evidence-based practice. Results from this project, despite being non-statistically significant, showed a decrease in STS scores from time-point zero (T0) to time-point one (T1) and increased resilience scores from time-point one (T1) to time-point two (T2), and from time-point zero (T0) to time-point two (T2). This project highlighted a deficit in knowledge of concepts of ST, STS and resilience among psychiatry RNs and inspired an open discussion on STS and other types of work-related stress among psychiatry RNs.

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Created

Date Created
2021-04-28