Matching Items (52)

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Decreasing and Providing Awareness for Burnout in Mental Health Care Workers

Description

Background: Alarming levels of burnout in mental health care staff is a significant concern not only for the organization but for the individual as well. Identifying and addressing burnout ought

Background: Alarming levels of burnout in mental health care staff is a significant concern not only for the organization but for the individual as well. Identifying and addressing burnout ought to be an essential protocol in a behavioral health organization. Currently, burnout remains an ongoing concern for mental health care organizations as it is associated with negative impacts for staff, patients, families, and the organization.

Method: The purpose of this project is to utilize the Maslach burnout inventory (MBI) survey tool to measure burnout pre and post intervention. The intervention utilized will be mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) to reduce burnout among mental healthcare workers. Implementing mindfulness interventions has evidence that it reduces burnout rates in mental health care staff. Current literature supports mindfulness-based interventions and have showed a decrease in burnout, stress, and depersonalization.

Results: The pre-intervention results were as followed: emotional exhaustion; 40, depersonalization; 20.4 and personal accomplishment 32. The post-intervention results emotional Exhaustion; 28, depersonalization; 14.90 and personal accomplishment 30. It was found that the category for emotional exhaustion was statistically significant as it had a P value .040, whereas depersonalization was not statistically significant as the P value was .171 and personal accomplishment was not statistically significant as the P value was .577.

Discussion: The use of MBI as an intervention has robust literature supporting the effectiveness in decreasing burnout and stress in mental health care staff.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05-01

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Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction: A Psychotherapeutic Intervention in Patients with Chronic Dermatological Diseases

Description

Psychological stress plays a vital role in skin disease. The worsening and reoccurrence of signs and symptoms of a wide array of skin diseases have been linked by various studies

Psychological stress plays a vital role in skin disease. The worsening and reoccurrence of signs and symptoms of a wide array of skin diseases have been linked by various studies to stress. Together, stress and skin disease synergistically inhibit occupational, social, and emotional functioning resulting in diminished quality of life (Dixon, Witcraft, & Perry, 2019). Heightened levels of stress may contribute to an assortment of immediate and future adverse outcomes. These outcomes include triggering a skin outbreak, impairing function, behavioral avoidance, intense negative emotions such as shame and embarrassment, and emotional distress such as depression and anxiety (Dixon et al., 2019).

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relationship of stress, anxiety, and depression to the specific chronic skin diseases of acne vulgaris, psoriasis, vitiligo, rosacea, and atopic dermatitis. It will also discuss how a psychotherapeutic intervention called mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) may decrease anxiety and depression in individuals affected by chronic skin diseases. This paper will also highlight the impact of MBSR on treatment adherence to dermatological prescription medications. A pilot program conducted in a dermatology clinic evaluates the effectiveness of an online mindfulness-based stress reduction intervention to decrease patient anxiety and depression.

Results indicate clinical significance in that participants noted reduced anxiety and depression symptoms and scores, enjoyed MBSR and would continue MBSR. The potential benefits of this pilot program may include decreased patient anxiety and depression, increased patient satisfaction, increased treatment adherence, improved patient satisfaction of intervention, and improved patient outcomes.

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Date Created
  • 2020-04-25

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A Trauma-Informed Intervention Using Mindfulness to Improve Early Childhood Classroom Environments.

Description

Research has shown adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have a lifelong negative impact on a person’s physical, mental, and social well-being. ACEs refer to experiences related to abuse, household challenges, or

Research has shown adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have a lifelong negative impact on a person’s physical, mental, and social well-being. ACEs refer to experiences related to abuse, household challenges, or neglect that occur before the age of 18. Some of the effects of ACEs include anxiety, depression, increased stress, increase in high-risk behaviors, and early death. Mindfulness practices have been shown to be an effective tool in reducing some of these symptoms. In looking for ways to prevent or mitigate the effects of ACEs, it is important to provide tools and resources to the adults taking care of children including; parents, guardians, and teachers.

The purpose of this evidence based project (EBP) was to evaluate mindfulness and classroom environments after the implementation of a mindfulness intervention. The intervention consisted of a three day training followed by four weeks of mindfulness practice prior to beginning the school day. Ten preschool and Early Head Start teachers from seven classrooms at a school in inner city Phoenix participated in the project. Utilizing the Five Factors Mindfulness Questionnaire pre and post intervention, a paired sample t-test showed a significant increase in two factors of mindfulness. The CLASS tool was used to assess classroom environment pre and post intervention and showed significant improvement in five classes. These findings support ongoing mindfulness training and practice for preschool and Early Head Start teachers to improve classroom environments.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05-01

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The Path to Success and Happiness: A Mindful and Interdependent Endeavor

Description

The purpose of this thesis is to explore the effectiveness of a mindful and interdependent approach to success and happiness. I believe our happiness should be a constant priority of

The purpose of this thesis is to explore the effectiveness of a mindful and interdependent approach to success and happiness. I believe our happiness should be a constant priority of ours. To achieve happiness, I argue that we should always be thoughtfully considering our own perspectives as well as the perspectives of others. I begin by explaining the components of the Happiness Chain, which I've developed through my examination of literature on mindfulness, the treatment of others, positivity, stress, and other interrelated areas. The Happiness Chain starts with an internal analysis of ourselves as individuals. The components of this section include mindfulness, stress, and positivity. The second section of the Happiness Chain deals with how we treat with others. In this section we use what we've learned in the first section to acknowledge how our actions affect the happiness of other people. Ultimately, the emotional state of one individual affects the emotional state of the individuals they interact with, so it is in our best interest to increase the happiness of those around us as well and not just ourselves. I then discuss the importance of the Happiness Chain to the organization by comparing it with emotional intelligence, which is necessary for an effective leader to have. I specifically discuss how each component of the Happiness Chain relates to the five characteristics of emotional intelligence: self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skill. Lastly, I provide specific tools that individuals, managers, or leaders, can use to achieve mindfulness and positivity for themselves and for others for a happier, more successful life overall.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Mindful Leadership: An Initiative to Integrate Transformative Learning into Barrett, the Honors College

Description

This paper proposes that mindfulness should be integrated into the culture and pedagogy of educational institutions like Barrett, the Honors College. Research suggests that members of the millennial generation experience

This paper proposes that mindfulness should be integrated into the culture and pedagogy of educational institutions like Barrett, the Honors College. Research suggests that members of the millennial generation experience higher levels of stress due to the conditions of their upbringing. The text explores the author's experience of mindfulness practice both outside of the classroom and as integrated into pedagogy through transformative learning courses. This paper shows that practicing mindfulness, improving self-talk, transformative learning, increasing social connection, and practicing Free Listening will help to cultivate a more mindful culture in Barrett and help to reduce stress-levels in students.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Mindfulness in the Workplace: Why It Matters

Description

The purpose of this project is to analyze the physical, mental, and interpersonal health benefits that "mindfulness" can bring to employees and upper division executives in numerous workplace settings. In

The purpose of this project is to analyze the physical, mental, and interpersonal health benefits that "mindfulness" can bring to employees and upper division executives in numerous workplace settings. In addition, this project also emphasizes the importance of having program implementation and how this could benefit employee and company success. The first portion consists of an academic literature review of the three categories of benefits on employee well-being in the workplace and how it can influence overall productivity and performance. Physical benefits include lower blood pressure; Mental benefits include lower levels of perceived stress; Interpersonal benefits include stronger relationship building and more efficient conflict resolution skills. Most research found proved to be statistically significant (mental and interpersonal benefits) whereas other research is still being practiced to produce significant results (physical and some mental health benefits). The second portion focuses on recent mindfulness programs that are established in well-known companies such as Aetna Insurance, the U.S. Marine Corps as well as a Counterproductive Work Study. All programs showed significant results in all three employee health categories when mindfulness was present. Finally, the third area of the project includes a suggested program outline that focuses on physical forms of meditation to enhance mindfulness along with happiness in conjunction with strengthening mental and interpersonal mindfulness skills.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Marvel at The Ordinary: A Community-Centered Gratitude Movement

Description

This project was generated out of a desire to understand and explore a novel twist on a well-traversed route to happiness. I set out looking for a new perspective on

This project was generated out of a desire to understand and explore a novel twist on a well-traversed route to happiness. I set out looking for a new perspective on fulfillment and found sustainable, everyday joy through gratitude. In doing so, I created a space where a group of people could practice and share gratitude as a community. Gratitude is familiar to most as a feeling, but putting intention behind gratitude turns it into an action, and even a virtue. In fact, Roman philosopher Cicero says, "Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all others." I created a Facebook community called Marvel at The Ordinary (MATO) applying principles rooted in the Theory of Change to express this greatest virtue. I found both success and earnest support from others in this novel approach to current gratitude practices. Defined by Dr. Robert Emmons, an expert in the science of gratitude, practicing gratitude is a two-step process: "(1.) affirming goodness in one's life, and (2.) recognizing that the sources of this goodness lie at least partially outside of the self." There is substantial research touting the worth of gratitude journaling, in fact, few things have been more repeatedly and empirically vetted than the connection between gratitude and overall happiness and well-being. Yet there is one facet ubiquitously overlooked in current gratitude research: what happens when gratitude journaling is shared with others? With anecdotal evidence, short-form interview analysis, thematic analysis of journaling lexicon, and a case study on the growth and engagement of Marvel at The Ordinary as a social movement, there is reason to believe that a social media-based community centered around gratitude may support and even enhance the practice of gratitude, which is typically practiced in isolation. It was also found that communities of this sort are highly sought after, based on the engagement within and growth of the Facebook group from 50 to 600+ members in a period of 2 months. MATO set out with the aspirations of creating a community which encourages others to gratitude journal, raising awareness about gratitude journaling, and building a community which fosters empathy, optimism, and awareness in an everyday sense. In each of these goals, overwhelming success was found.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Mindfulness as an Intervention to Mitigate and Decrease Rates of Burnout in Registered Nurses: A Systematic Literature Review

Description

The aim of this review is to explore the effects of mindfulness-based interventions on Registered Nurse's rate of burnout and stress. Particularly focusing on the mitigation and decrease of burnout.

The aim of this review is to explore the effects of mindfulness-based interventions on Registered Nurse's rate of burnout and stress. Particularly focusing on the mitigation and decrease of burnout. Burnout is a multifaceted, complex issue that has become engrained in the culture of nursing and a widespread epidemic. Burnout has detrimental effects for the quality of life of the nurse, patient outcomes, interprofessional collaboration, and nursing practice. A systematic literature review incorporating qualitative data and analyzing the quantitative data was conducted. Studies on the effects of mindfulness-based interventions for nurses relating to burnout published between January 2008 and May 2018 were identified through a systematic search in electronic databases: CINHAL, Cochrane, Embase, Medline, PsycInfo, and PubMed. Gray literature was searched through Scopus and clinical trials were explored through clincialtrials.gov. Data analysis was based on 8 data points that were extracted from the research. A total of 17 articles were selected for inclusion in the systematic literature review. There were several different types of studies including single group intervention study, randomized control trial interventions studies, mixed model, quasi-experimental studies with controls, and a non-randomized controlled comparison. All relied on self-reporting scales and questionnaire for quantitative pre-post intervention changes. Overall, the 10 of the 17 studies found that there was a statistically significant decrease in burnout rates and an increase in mindfulness post intervention. Several other factors improved in a number of studies such as quality of life, decreased stress, increased sense of personal accomplishment, and decreased emotional exhaustion. There were also indications of an improvement in the individual's holistic well-being (e.g. inner state of calmness, awareness and enthusiasm) relating to improved mindfulness levels in 12 of the studies. Based on the results of this systematic review, mindfulness may be considered a potentially effective intervention for decreasing nurse burnout and mitigating future burnout. This intervention could be useful in a number of contexts including on-site and off-site programs with institutional support. Future research should explore longitudinal outcomes of mindfulness practice, symptom focused outcome measures, and multi-modal studies.

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Date Created
  • 2018-12

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What Does It Mean for Ages 17-24 to Thrive? A Four-Week Course

Description

The purpose of this thesis is to see if a correlation exists between young adults’ personal perception of thriving and a curated online and written course centered around thriving. The

The purpose of this thesis is to see if a correlation exists between young adults’ personal perception of thriving and a curated online and written course centered around thriving. The course, What Does It Mean for Ages 17 – 24 to Thrive, took place over the span of four weeks and focused on concepts of personal strengths, goal setting, gratitude and thriving. Through this course, students were expected to complete daily practices, weekly challenges and weekly reflections to help build healthy habits for their overall well-being. This course was created in hopes of seeing an improvement from the student’s levels and perception of thriving before and after the course. To collect data, the study began with qualitative interviews to gain an understanding of the participants and their current level of thriving. Throughout the duration of the course, data and feedback was gathered through the students’ assignment submissions every week. As the course came to a close, data was collected through a final round of qualitative interviews focusing on the students’ biggest takeaways from the course. In analyzing the data, one of the biggest challenges came from the students not having enough time to complete all of the daily practices. However, every student mentioned they were able to take something away from this course and hope to implement the exercises into their daily lives. One significant finding came from the survey question, “Do you actively think about your purpose in life?” Prior to the course, there was a mixture of responses stating yes, no, and somewhat. However, after the course, almost every student responded “yes” and one student responded “somewhat.” Overall, it is evident that young adults hope to thrive in life, however, their biggest challenge comes from finding enough time for themselves outside of school and work. This course allowed students to put thriving into perspective and allowed them all to grow.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

An Autoethnography on Hemiplegic Migraine and Alternative Medicine

Description

This autoethnography is the culmination of years of migraine research and self-experimentation with alternative medicine to treat Hemiplegic Migraine (HM). HM is a rare phenomenon that is commonly misdiagnosed as

This autoethnography is the culmination of years of migraine research and self-experimentation with alternative medicine to treat Hemiplegic Migraine (HM). HM is a rare phenomenon that is commonly misdiagnosed as a stroke or epilepsy disorder since the symptoms can include partial unilateral paralysis or weakness, visual disturbances, unilateral headache, vomiting, and trouble speaking. There is no known cure for HM, and current migraine medications can be accompanied by adverse side effects at an expensive cost. Alternative medicine, such as dietary supplementation, meditation, and positive thinking are potential options for working in relationship with HM episodes. This thesis explores HM as a personally transformative experience by learning to grow from pain.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05