Matching Items (32)

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Empowering Women in Zambia through Computational Thinking Curriculum

Description

The nonprofit organization, I Am Zambia, works to give supplemental education to young women in Lusaka. I Am Zambia is creating sustainable change by educating these females, who can then

The nonprofit organization, I Am Zambia, works to give supplemental education to young women in Lusaka. I Am Zambia is creating sustainable change by educating these females, who can then lift their families and communities out of poverty. The ultimate goal of this thesis was to explore and implement high level systematic problem solving through basic and specialized computational thinking curriculum at I Am Zambia in order to give these women an even larger stepping stool into a successful future.

To do this, a 4-week long pilot curriculum was created, implemented, and tested through an optional class at I Am Zambia, available to women who had already graduated from the year-long I Am Zambia Academy program. A total of 18 women ages 18-24 chose to enroll in the course. There were a total of 10 lessons, taught over 20 class period. These lessons covered four main computational thinking frameworks: introduction to computational thinking, algorithmic thinking, pseudocode, and debugging. Knowledge retention was tested through the use of a CS educational tool, QuizIt, created by the CSI Lab of School of Computing, Informatics and Decision Systems Engineering at Arizona State University. Furthermore, pre and post tests were given to assess the successfulness of the curriculum in teaching students the aforementioned concepts. 14 of the 18 students successfully completed the pre and post test.

Limitations of this study and suggestions for how to improve this curriculum in order to extend it into a year long course are also presented at the conclusion of this paper.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Growing Global: Tempe's Global Citizenship Education Program

Description

According to the 2010 census, 40 million people living in the United States were foreign-born, meaning they were not U.S. citizens at birth (2). The Harvard Business Review also said

According to the 2010 census, 40 million people living in the United States were foreign-born, meaning they were not U.S. citizens at birth (2). The Harvard Business Review also said that "In 2017, strong growth across most of the world propelled the DHL Global Connectedness Index to a record high. The proportions of trade, capital, information, and people flow crossing national borders all increased significantly" (7). With the U.S. being a cultural "mixing pot" and the world being more globalized than ever before, we must incorporate global citizenship education in our school systems. Growing Global is a creative project thesis that explores the idea of a global citizenship after-school program for youth in the Tempe Public School District. The outcomes of this project will be a proposal for the program, a curriculum outline including three examples of lesson plans [see Exhibit 1], student surveys for measuring curriculum effectiveness [see Exhibit 3], and an educator training guide and preparedness assessment [see Exhibits 2 and 4]. The Growing Global project proposal will cover the need for the program, a program timeline and explanation, the impact it will hold and how to measure it, potential barriers, the capacity of the team and its resources, and the budget for piloting the program.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Addressing Mental Health in Rural Indian Primary Schools Through Experiential Learning: A Viable Model?

Description

Social-emotional learning (SEL) methods are beginning to receive global attention in primary school education, yet the dominant emphasis on implementing these curricula is in high-income, urbanized areas. Consequently, the unique

Social-emotional learning (SEL) methods are beginning to receive global attention in primary school education, yet the dominant emphasis on implementing these curricula is in high-income, urbanized areas. Consequently, the unique features of developing and integrating such methods in middle- or low-income rural areas are unclear. Past studies suggest that students exposed to SEL programs show an increase in academic performance, improved ability to cope with stress, and better attitudes about themselves, others, and school, but these curricula are designed with an urban focus. The purpose of this study was to conduct a needs-based analysis to investigate components specific to a SEL curriculum contextualized to rural primary schools. A promising organization committed to rural educational development is Barefoot College, located in Tilonia, Rajasthan, India. In partnership with Barefoot, we designed an ethnographic study to identify and describe what teachers and school leaders consider the highest needs related to their students' social and emotional education. To do so, we interviewed 14 teachers and school leaders individually or in a focus group to explore their present understanding of “social-emotional learning” and the perception of their students’ social and emotional intelligence. Analysis of this data uncovered common themes among classroom behaviors and prevalent opportunities to address social and emotional well-being among students. These themes translated into the three overarching topics and eight sub-topics explored throughout the curriculum, and these opportunities guided the creation of the 21 modules within it. Through a design-based research methodology, we developed a 40-hour curriculum by implementing its various modules within seven Barefoot classrooms alongside continuous reiteration based on teacher feedback and participant observation. Through this process, we found that student engagement increased during contextualized SEL lessons as opposed to traditional methods. In addition, we found that teachers and students preferred and performed better with an activities-based approach. These findings suggest that rural educators must employ particular teaching strategies when addressing SEL, including localized content and an experiential-learning approach. Teachers reported that as their approach to SEL shifted, they began to unlock the potential to build self-aware, globally-minded students. This study concludes that social and emotional education cannot be treated in a generalized manner, as curriculum development is central to the teaching-learning process.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Cookies 4 Change

Description

This thesis discusses our path toward creating Cookies 4 Change (C4C), a student organization at Arizona State University. This organization works in tandem with the Community School's Initiative (CSI) at

This thesis discusses our path toward creating Cookies 4 Change (C4C), a student organization at Arizona State University. This organization works in tandem with the Community School's Initiative (CSI) at Children's First Leadership Academy (CFLA), a school for housing insecure K-8 students in the valley. This mission of Cookies 4 Change is to mentor 7th and 8th grade students of the CSI program at Children's First Leadership Academy in life, in entrepreneurial endeavors, in academic pursuits, and in fundraising to illuminate future potential in both education and careers beyond. To fulfill this mission, we researched three main fields: volunteer motivation, self-esteem in the classroom, and curriculum. This research helped us to first determine the best way to structure our organization to keep ASU students engaged, second to build the self-esteem of the middle school students, and third to create sustainable curriculum on the topic of entrepreneurship. In addition, to ensure the sustainability of Cookies 4 Change, we are developing strong and committed members to take the reigns of the organization when we graduate. We have created detailed pass along documents to complement this thesis and assist them in running C4C. Lastly, we discuss the potential scalability of Cookies 4 Change as a concept to different underprivileged schools in the valley and other cities with a similar socioeconomic makeup. By delving further into our story, the research, the organization, the curriculum, our future, and the scalability, we hope to detail the work we have done to help these students and how the organization will continue helping after we are gone.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

Implementing Critical Thinking Skills into Fourth Grade Social Science Curriculum

Description

During the 2020-2021 school year, Arizona teachers will be expected to implement a new set of Social Science Standards into their curriculum. The Arizona Department of Education (ADE) issued an

During the 2020-2021 school year, Arizona teachers will be expected to implement a new set of Social Science Standards into their curriculum. The Arizona Department of Education (ADE) issued an implementation guide for these new standards that began in 2017. The upcoming 2020-2021 year will be the first year that these standards will be fully utilized in the classroom. To assist first year teachers and teachers that are struggling with the new changes, an eight-lesson work book was created. These lessons are in alignment with the updated Arizona standards, as well as the four main critical thinking skills, problem solving, questioning, evaluating sources, and decision making. These lessons were created with the Problem Based Learning style in mind and are formatted in a “5E” lesson template. The workbook features a four-lesson unit on Natural Disasters. The entire lesson is STEM based, utilizes different English Language Arts techniques, and provides interactive components. The second half of the workbook features four lessons that start a unit on Native Americans. This curriculum was created based on lesson templates provided by the Chandler Unified School District and were created to aid first year teachers, as well as teachers that need assistance with the transition to new standards.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Fair Trade: History, Ethics & Impact 1-Credit Course

Description

This course will cover the history, ethics and impact of the fair trade movement for a variety of stakeholders in the Global South and Global North. We will be participating

This course will cover the history, ethics and impact of the fair trade movement for a variety of stakeholders in the Global South and Global North. We will be participating in various activities that will acquaint us with different topics, including globalization, the gender wage gap, environmental degradation and supply chain management. Guest speakers from the fair trade community will contribute their perspectives regarding the movement. Students will gain an understanding of the tradeoffs of the fair trade movement for the different actors throughout the length of the supply chain. Students will describe the purpose of the fair trade movement and who it seeks to serve. Students will explain what the Fair Trade certification entails for the actors who engage in the system. Students will debate the tradeoffs of the fair trade movement, incorporating the perspectives of multiple stakeholders from both the Global South and Global North. Finally, students will evaluate Fair Trade as a tool for sustainability both socially and economically.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Perceptions of English Language Education by Taiwanese International Students

Description

While English language education has become increasingly prominent worldwide, countries have adopted various initiatives to increase English language development. One country making a push for English language development is Taiwan;

While English language education has become increasingly prominent worldwide, countries have adopted various initiatives to increase English language development. One country making a push for English language development is Taiwan; however, current educational practices and values can prove to be challenges in implementing new methods. For example, although Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) methods gained popularity starting in the 1990s, they have been slow to take hold in Taiwan. Additionally, Taiwan’s Ministry of Education is pushing for bilingualism by the year 2030, introducing curricular reforms and new strategies to increase the prominence of English on a social level. In order to analyze current educational methods and practices in Taiwan, as well as predict the efficacy of new strategies, this study focused on gathering the perspectives and experiences of the students themselves. International students were specifically targeted, as they have had exposure to multiple educational environments, as well as firsthand experience applying their English language knowledge in an immersive environment. To gather student perspective, an online survey was made available to Taiwanese international students currently studying in a U.S. university. Respondents were asked multiple-choice questions on curricular focus, as well as short answer questions regarding their educational experiences. Overall, the respondents showed an agreement in regards to the heavy emphasis of reading, writing, and grammar in Taiwan, which they correlated directly with high-stakes exams, particularly the university entrance exam. They also noted the lack of speaking and listening practice, as well as a strong desire to apply English in a communicative sense. These observations hold significant implications for various stakeholders, including teachers, principals, curriculum developers, exam designers, and university admissions.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12

Concentrating on Law School: Creating Pre-Law School Curriculum at ASU

Description

"Concentrating on Law School: Creating Pre-Law Curriculum at ASU" partners with the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions to create a fifteen-credit certificate program at Arizona State University

"Concentrating on Law School: Creating Pre-Law Curriculum at ASU" partners with the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions to create a fifteen-credit certificate program at Arizona State University to help students prepare for law school. The certificate, Legal and Policy Studies, incorporates sixty-two courses from twenty-two different disciplines at the university. The program aims to supplement a student's primary major and field of interest while simultaneously providing a foundation of public policy to better understand the subject of law and students' surrounding community. The law school preparation program is designed based on a philosophy of accessibility to rigorous preparation by students of all socioeconomic backgrounds and high student discretion. The Legal and Policy Studies certificate, if implemented at the university, will be the most interdisciplinary pre-law preparation program in the nation. The project is comprised of multiple parts: research conducted to identify law school preparation resources already offered at ASU, comparative research of academic programs at other universities, input from both law school-hopeful undergraduates and current ASU Law 1Ls into the program's formation, and creation of the certificate program. The certificate also includes a mock law class specifically for undergraduates (PAF 499), which would be introduced to the university in AY 2019-2020. The thesis recommends that the class be similarly structured to a 1L law class regarding rigor, cold-calling culture, and introduction to basic skills imperative to law school success (i.e. how to brief cases, Bluebook/Westlaw basics). The thesis also encourages the Watts College to hire an faculty member to teach the mock law class with a background teaching 1L courses and a general familiarity with the structure and culture of a first year law course.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Our eyes, the window to our soul: understanding the impact of images on social studies curricula and lived experience

Description

Abstract

On a daily basis I am bombarded with images in every walk of life. I encounter images crossing my path constantly through media such as the internet, television, magazines,

Abstract

On a daily basis I am bombarded with images in every walk of life. I encounter images crossing my path constantly through media such as the internet, television, magazines, radio, social media, even in the grocery store line on screens intended to capture our attention. As I drive down the roadways, I am invaded by images that at times can be distracting with their dazzling displays, attempting to get our attention and get us to consume their product or service or understand a historical meaning. In this dissertation I intend on looking at murals and two social studies textbooks to focus types of media; then construct an argument about how these media impact social studies curricula in the communities in which they are located taking into consideration race, social class, language, location, and culture. The intent is to critically analyze traditional curricula and curricula found in public pedagogy in communities located on the borderlands. I also asked local high school-aged students, teachers, artists, and activists from both sides of the border analyze the images through photo elicitation and traditional interviews. Students were interviewed with a focus on interpreted meanings of images presented. Teachers and artists were interviewed to discover their intended meanings as displayed through their production and circulation of intended meanings via lessons and the images they select or create. Activists were interviewed to discover local history, images, and history of the educational space where the artwork and schools are located. I used these data to create an argument as to how these forms of media impacts school curricula in the areas on both sides of the United States/Mexico border. The study was conducted in border cities El Paso, Texas and Juarez, Chihuahua. The ultimate goal was to look at how academics and curricula developers can use this information to decolonize curricula in the field of curricula studies. Moreover, this information can be used to create decolonized ideologies in curricula that can be used at the school sites to promote diversity and social justice for students in their schooling experience.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Reflective photographic practice: developing socially engaged student photographers

Description

This study examines the possibility of using social and historical contexts, image analysis, and personal themes to engage adolescent photography students in the craft of photography. This new curriculum

This study examines the possibility of using social and historical contexts, image analysis, and personal themes to engage adolescent photography students in the craft of photography. This new curriculum was designed around large themes that correspond to the developmental stage of adolescence. Issues such as self-identity, teenage stereotypes, school, family, and community were explored through examining historical documents and photographs, comparing popular culture perspectives, and learning basic semiotics. The students then worked within these ideas by creating their own photographs and reflecting upon their art making choices. The new approach was implemented in an analog film class in which basic 35mm camera and film techniques are taught. It is argued that meaning making motivates the adolescent photographer rather than the achievement of strong technical skills. This qualitative study was conducted using an action research approach, in which the author was both the classroom teacher and the researcher. The study incorporates data collected from student-created photographs, student written responses, interviews of students, interviews of photography teachers, and the researcher's field notes. Major themes were discovered over time by applying a grounded theory approach to understanding the data. The curriculum brought a new level of student engagement, both in participation in the course and in the complexity of their image making. By incorporating the chosen topics, students' images were rich with personal meaning. Students retained concepts of historical and social uses for photography and demonstrated a base understanding of semiotic theory. Furthermore, the data points to a stronger sense of community and teacher-student relationships within the classroom. The researcher argues that this deeper rapport is due to the concentration on personal themes within the practice of photography. Setbacks within the study included censorship by the school of mature subjects, a limited amount of equipment, and a limited amount of time with the students. This study demonstrates the need for art curriculum to provide connections between visual art, interdisciplinary associations, students' level of development, and students' personal interests. The research provides a possible approach to redesigning curriculum for photography courses for the twenty-first century student.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011