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An updated food guide for vegetarians adapted to MyPlate: an evidence based approach

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In 2002, a scientifically derived food guide pyramid for vegetarians, the Modified Food Guide for Lacto-ovo-vegetarians and Vegans was published and well received. Now that 10 years have passed, new

In 2002, a scientifically derived food guide pyramid for vegetarians, the Modified Food Guide for Lacto-ovo-vegetarians and Vegans was published and well received. Now that 10 years have passed, new scientific literature regarding the bioavailability of the nutrients of key concern in vegetarian diets has been published, and the graphical format of the nation's food guide has evolved from a pyramid shape into a circular plate. The objective of this research was to examine the post-2002 literature regarding the bioavailability of key nutrients in vegetarian diets; to use this information to update the recommendations made in the 2002 Modified Food Guide Pyramid for Lacto-ovo-vegetarians and Vegans; and to adapt this revised food plan to the new USDA MyPlate format. This process involved reviewing the scientific literature to determine if the DRIs for the nutrients of key concern in vegetarian diets are adequate for the vegetarian population and using this information to develop new recommendations for vegetarians if necessary, analyzing the nutrient content of representative foods in different food groups, reconfiguring the food groups so that foods with like nutrient components were grouped together, determining the number of servings of each food group required to meet vegetarians' nutrient requirements at three caloric levels, and developing sample menus. A circular plate graphic, the Vegetarian Plate, was designed to illustrate the recommendations of this updated food guide. This updated, scientifically derived food guide provides a sound base for diet planning for lacto-ovo-vegetarians and vegans. Further research is needed to assess the Vegetarian Plate's adequacy for children, pregnant and lactating women, athletes, and individuals with medical conditions or chronic diseases.

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Date Created
  • 2013

Eat Well, Live Well: ASU’s First Major Event for Plant-Based Diets and Sustainability

Description

Aramark is a 14.6 billion-dollar Fortune 500 company that provides food services in education, healthcare, business, leisure, and more. They run 72 food operations across Arizona State University's (ASU) campuses.

Aramark is a 14.6 billion-dollar Fortune 500 company that provides food services in education, healthcare, business, leisure, and more. They run 72 food operations across Arizona State University's (ASU) campuses. The company has internal commitments to environmental sustainability and health and wellness respectively outlined in, "Green Thread," and "Healthy for Life 20 By 20." ASU follows the sustainability guidelines presented by The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). In recognition of the negative environmental effects of animal agriculture, the AASHE guidelines have recently changed, which requires Aramark to source more plant-based products. On March 14th, Aramark and I hosted, “Eat Well, Live Well,” ASU’s first large event to celebrate plant-based diets and sustainability. The event had 3 objectives: to educate and excite event-goers about plant-based diets and sustainability, to alter perceptions, and to stimulate behavior change. Before entering the event, event-goers (largely students) were prompted to fill out a survey that measures their perceptions on the benefits and barriers to consuming a plant-based diet. A post-event survey was distributed to measure the same event-goers’ change in knowledge, perceptions, and behavior. The post-event survey results indicate that, “Eat Well, Live Well,” motivated 59% of event-goers to reduce their consumption of animal-products. The post-event survey results are used to understand whether the event met its objectives. This project takes a community based social marketing (CBSM) approach to fostering sustainable behavior within the student body, as it uses students’ perceived barriers and benefits to develop a compelling case to Aramark on how they should offer and promote plant-based diets on all of ASU campuses.

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  • 2019-04-26