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Self-Esteem, Dietary Habits, and Perception of Body Image Among the Homeless Population

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Since underserved individuals do not have a steady supply of food, this study explored whether their standards of what they view as healthy differs from individuals who can afford a basic living that includes food and shelter. Data collection from

Since underserved individuals do not have a steady supply of food, this study explored whether their standards of what they view as healthy differs from individuals who can afford a basic living that includes food and shelter. Data collection from surveys provided information to see whether the struggles of obtaining food affects what is perceived as healthy, and whether there is a difference in dietary habits, perception of body image, and self-esteem. Homeless individuals displayed that they were more aware than non-homeless individuals that the food they were consuming was unhealthy. They were also less satisfied with their daily food diet, as most of them wished that they ate greater quantities of certain foods. Their daily food intake did confirm that they consumed more unhealthy food that lacked nutrition compared to non-homeless individuals. They also generally believed that thicker body images were healthier and more attractive compared to non-homeless people who thought that thinner body images were healthier and attractive. Homeless people also generally ranked lower on the body image scale than the image they thought was most desirable and healthy. This revealed a lack of satisfaction with their own current body. Additionally, the self-efficacy score displayed that homeless individuals generally scored lower for their self-esteem level compared to non-homeless people. This demonstrated that their daily struggles and lifestyle impacts their emotions and overall confidence.

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2018-05

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Evaluating Structural Barriers to Quality Care in the SHOW Free Clinic

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Homelessness is a pervasive in American society. The causes of homelessness are complex, but health and homelessness are inextricably linked. Student-run free clinics care for underserved populations, including people experiencing homelessness, but they have multiple agendas—to provide care but also

Homelessness is a pervasive in American society. The causes of homelessness are complex, but health and homelessness are inextricably linked. Student-run free clinics care for underserved populations, including people experiencing homelessness, but they have multiple agendas—to provide care but also to give students hands-on experience. It is plausible that these two agendas may compete and give patients sub-par quality of care.
This study examines patient care in the SHOW free clinic in Phoenix, Arizona, which serves adults experiencing homelessness. This study asks two questions: First, do clinicians in Phoenix’s SHOW free clinic discuss with patients how to pay for and where to access follow-up services and medications? Second, how do the backgrounds of patients, measured by scales based on the Gelberg-Anderson behavioral model for vulnerable populations, correlate with patient outcomes, including number of unmet needs in clinic, patient satisfaction with care, and patient perceived health status? To answer these questions, structured surveys were administered to SHOW clinic patients at the end of their visits. Results were analyzed using Pearson’s correlations and odds ratios. 21 patients completed the survey over four weeks in February-March 2017. We did not identify any statistically significant correlations between predisposing factors such as severity/duration of homelessness, mental health history, ethnicity, or LGBTQ status and quality of care outcomes. Twenty nine percent of surveyed patients reported having one or more unmet needs following their SHOW clinic visit suggesting an important area for future research. The results from this study indicate that measuring unmet needs is a feasible alternative to patient satisfaction surveys for assessing quality of care in student-run free clinics for homeless populations.

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2017-05

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Comparative Analysis of Interprofessional Clinic Models: Recommendations for Best Practice Implementation

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As the complexity of healthcare continues to rise, the need for change in healthcare delivery is more prominent than ever. One strategy identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) for responding to these increasing complexities is the use of interprofessional

As the complexity of healthcare continues to rise, the need for change in healthcare delivery is more prominent than ever. One strategy identified by the World Health Organization (WHO) for responding to these increasing complexities is the use of interprofessional practice and education to improve patient outcomes, reduce costs, and enhance the patient experience of care (Triple Aim). Interprofessional collaboration among diverse disciplines is evident on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, integrating a wide variety of institutions and multiple health profession programs; and at the Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) free clinic, -- a successful tri-university, student-led, faculty mentored, and community-based model of interprofessional learning and care -- based in downtown Phoenix. This project conducted a comparative analysis of interprofessional components of 6 different clinical models in order to provide recommendations for best practice implementation. These models were chosen based on availability of research on interprofessionalism with their clinics. As a result, three recommendations were offered to the SHOW clinic for consideration in their efforts to improve both patient and educational outcomes. Each recommendation was intentionally formulated for its capacity to increase: interprofessionalism and collaboration between multiple disciplines pertaining to healthcare, among healthcare professionals to promote positive patient and educational outcomes. These recommendations include implementing an interprofessional education (IPE) course as a core component in an academic program's curriculum, offering faculty and professional development opportunities for faculty and mentors immersed in the interprofessional clinics, and utilization of simulation centers. Further studies will be needed to evaluate the impact these specific interventions, if adopted, on patient and educational outcomes.

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2017-05

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Combating COVID-19 in Maricopa County’s Homeless Population

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The purpose of this report is to review the current literature concerning management of the COVID-19 pandemic in homeless populations, and to use it to analyze the specific interventions established in Maricopa County—such as those aimed at education, vaccination and

The purpose of this report is to review the current literature concerning management of the COVID-19 pandemic in homeless populations, and to use it to analyze the specific interventions established in Maricopa County—such as those aimed at education, vaccination and testing, and maintaining continuity of care. In doing so, I hope to illustrate the unique challenges faced by people experiencing homelessness, provide context for disparities in health outcome, and inform action for both the ongoing pandemic and future outbreaks

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2022-05