Matching Items (28)

134491-Thumbnail Image.png

Ending Homelessness in Phoenix: How Investments in Housing First Could End Homelessness in the Valley

Description

Homelessness is one of the most visible and tragic problems facing Phoenix today. As Tucson cut its homelessness count nearly in half over the past six years, Phoenix only saw

Homelessness is one of the most visible and tragic problems facing Phoenix today. As Tucson cut its homelessness count nearly in half over the past six years, Phoenix only saw a reduction of 25%. The question remains: what is the best solution for Phoenix to reduce and eventually eliminate homelessness? This paper examined costs and benefits as well as examples in other cities and states of Housing First solutions' effectiveness at reducing the number of people suffering from homelessness. It was found that Housing First solutions, namely Permanent Supportive Housing and Rapid Re-Housing, would be highly effective in combating the homelessness experienced by those in the Phoenix area.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

134722-Thumbnail Image.png

Arizona Homeless Solutions

Description

In this project dubbed "Arizona Homeless Solutions," the reporter attempted to take a solutions journalism approach to covering family homelessness in Arizona with an emphasis on one program, Save the

In this project dubbed "Arizona Homeless Solutions," the reporter attempted to take a solutions journalism approach to covering family homelessness in Arizona with an emphasis on one program, Save the Family. As a state, Arizona has been remarkably successful in reducing the number of homeless families in the state. According to the 2016 State of Homelessness in America Report, the state reduced its number of homeless family households by 22 percent, the sixth largest reduction nationally. This success is due in large part to the effective collaboration of a variety of organizations. But one program in particular, Save the Family, had received praise throughout the community for its successful and innovative intervention effort. The organization was also very data-conscious, making it a good program to look at for a solutions journalism approach. Solutions journalism is a form of journalism that attempts to go beyond simply reporting on a problem. Instead, it focuses on the responses to social issues, and takes a critical look at how successful or unsuccessful an effort is and what can be learned from it. It is a rigorous, evidence-based and critical approach to reporting, that really is not all that different from traditional in-depth reporting. The reporter spent about a year putting this approach into practice by dissecting two of the organizations major intervention programs, transitional housing and rapid rehousing. He interviewed seven full-time staff members on multiple occasions. He also interviewed experts from Maricopa County Continuum of Care, as well as individuals from the City of Mesa and another homeless service provider, UMOM New Day Centers. Lastly, the reporter spent time with one family that had come through Save the Family's transitional housing program and is now permanently stabilized in a house all their own. During the process of reporting, the reporter also maintained a blog on the AZ Homeless Solutions website in which he chronicled his reporting experience, publishing anecdotes from his notebook and short blurbs on catching parts of his interviews. He would also post about current homeless advocacy events. The blog ultimately had about a dozen posts. After months of reporting and maintaining the blog, the reporter produced a solutions journalism piece on Save the Family's effort that was about 2,500 words in length. The final product was published on the website.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

134880-Thumbnail Image.png

Feasibility Study: Housing First Program in Tucson Arizona

Description

The United States is arguably the most powerful country in the world boasting the largest GDP and yet there are over half a million homeless Americans as of November 2015.

The United States is arguably the most powerful country in the world boasting the largest GDP and yet there are over half a million homeless Americans as of November 2015. While traditional solutions to combat homelessness adequately assist the majority of people experiencing homelessness as a short-term issue, traditional solutions do not serve the complex needs of the chronically homeless. One creative solution being applied across the nation to end chronic homelessness is Housing First. This report assesses the feasibility of a Housing First program in Tucson Arizona to reduce unsheltered rates. It discusses the current state of homelessness across the nation and in Tucson, explains the existing methods used to reduce unsheltered rates and explores the cost and benefits of implementing such a program. This report concludes with recommendations for implementing a Housing First program in Tucson, Arizona.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

134830-Thumbnail Image.png

What We Miss When We Define an Entire Human Experience With One Word: 'Homeless'

Description

With homelessness existing in the complex web of poverty that persists in the living environments that stretch across this nation, it has become incredibly important to understand the intricacies that

With homelessness existing in the complex web of poverty that persists in the living environments that stretch across this nation, it has become incredibly important to understand the intricacies that navigate and perpetuate this in our society. With homelessness being an individual experience of struggle and survival, the current dialogue does not reflect such. The current dialogue communicates homelessness as a shared hardship, a result of similar decisions. Such dialogue has shown to be malevolent and accusatory, as it makes no room to portray the individual experience, and the actual cause and perpetuation of such a living situation. Attached to the concept of homelessness are specific stereotypes, generalizations, and negative assumptions, which go into creating the grounds for biases and stigma that revolve around the image of homelessness. To gauge the current dialogue that exists around homelessness and how this dialogue is internalized, one-on-one interviews were conducted. These interviews produced narratives that were pieced together to present a more inclusive, understanding, and holistic dialogue around the concept and human experience of homelessness, and poverty altogether. These narratives reveal the flaws and social injustices that are posed by the current dialogue, and further provide the necessary pieces to improve such conversations. In transforming the current dialogue, the human experience of homelessness can be greater understood and, therefore, redefine the vitality of a shared humanity.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

134775-Thumbnail Image.png

Mapping Urban Water Insecurity: A Case Study of Homelessness in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A.

Description

In this project we examine the geographical availability of water resources for persons experiencing homelessness in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A. Persons experiencing homelessness spend a significant portion of their time outdoors

In this project we examine the geographical availability of water resources for persons experiencing homelessness in Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.A. Persons experiencing homelessness spend a significant portion of their time outdoors and as such have a higher risk of dehydration, heat-related illness, and heat stress. Our data was collected using archival data, participant- observation, focal follows with water distributors that serve homeless populations, phone and internet surveys with social service providers, and expert interviews with 14 local service providers. We analyzed this data using methods for thematic coding and geospatial analysis. We find that the sources of water and geographic availability vary across the economic sectors of the population and that they become more unconventional and more difficult to access with further isolation. We conclude that many persons who are experience homelessness have inconsistent and unreliable access to water for hydrating, maintaining hygiene, cooking and cleaning for reasons that are largely due to geographic inaccessibility.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

134256-Thumbnail Image.png

Care Not Cash: A New Kind of Reform

Description

This thesis examines Care Not Cash, a welfare reform measure that replaced traditional cash General Assistance program payments for homeless persons in San Francisco with in-kind social services. Unlike most

This thesis examines Care Not Cash, a welfare reform measure that replaced traditional cash General Assistance program payments for homeless persons in San Francisco with in-kind social services. Unlike most welfare reform measures, proponents framed Care Not Cash as a progressive policy, aimed at expanding social services and government care for this vulnerable population. Drawing on primary and secondary documents, as well as interviews with homelessness policy experts, this thesis examines the historical and political success of Care Not Cash, and explores the potential need for implementation of a similar program in Phoenix, Arizona.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

134231-Thumbnail Image.png

Homeless Individuals' Perceptions of Welcomeness versus Unwelcomeness by Emergency Department Staff

Description

Homelessness has a history of existing as a misunderstood condition involving stereotypes, stigmas and assumptions. In fact, the combination of acute-care medical professionals with patients of chronic illness and chronic

Homelessness has a history of existing as a misunderstood condition involving stereotypes, stigmas and assumptions. In fact, the combination of acute-care medical professionals with patients of chronic illness and chronic homelessness can lead to incongruity of attitudes. These mindsets have the potential to affect the care homeless individuals receive in the emergency department (ED) and impact their intentions to seek medical help in the future (Ugarriza & Fallon, 1994, pp. 26). Furthermore, homeless individuals account for 54.5% of all ED visits in the United States (Kushel et al., 2002). The author conducted a qualitative descriptive study of 10 in-person interviews with homeless individuals in the downtown Phoenix, AZ area. The objective was to determine homeless individuals' perceptions of welcomeness and unwelcomeness by emergency department staff. Findings support significantly unwelcome experiences in the ED and negative perceptions of ED staff through repeating concepts of dehumanization, dismissal, stereotypes and discrimination. Further research is needed to create interventions for improving perceptions of ED staff, promoting health and preventing illness in the homeless population, and reducing ED visits by homeless individuals.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

135325-Thumbnail Image.png

Social Impact Bonds to Address Phoenix Homelessness

Description

Social impact bonds (SIBs) are a multi-year contract between social service providers, the government, and private investors. The three parties agree on a specific outcome for a societal issue. Investors

Social impact bonds (SIBs) are a multi-year contract between social service providers, the government, and private investors. The three parties agree on a specific outcome for a societal issue. Investors provide capital required for the service provider to operate the project. The service provider then delivers the service to the target population. The success of the project is evaluated by outside party. If the target outcome is met, the government repays the investors at a premium. Nonprofit service providers can only serve a small community as they lack the funding to scale their programs and their reliance on government funding and philanthropy leads to a lot of time focused on raising money in the short-term and inhibits them from evolving their programs and projects for long-term strategic success. Government budgets decline but social problems persist. These contracts share risk between the government and the investors and allow governments to test out programs and alleviate taxpayer burdens from unsuccessful social service programs. Arizona has a severe homelessness problem. Nightly, 6000 people are homeless in Maricopa County. In a given year, over 32,000 individuals were homeless, composed of single adults, families, children, and veterans. Homelessness is not only a debilitating and difficult experience for those who experience it, but also has considerable economic costs on society. Homeless individuals use a number of government programs beyond emergency shelters, and these can cost taxpayers billions of dollars per year. Rapid rehousing was a successful intervention model that the state has been heavily investing in the last few years. This thesis aimed to survey the Arizona climate and determine what barriers were present for enacting an SIB for homelessness. The findings showed that although there are many competent stakeholder groups, lack of interest and overall knowledge of SIBs prevented groups from taking responsibility as the anchor for such a project. Additionally, the government and nonprofits had good partnerships, but lacked relationships with the business community and investors that could propel an SIB. Finally, although rapid rehousing can be used as a successful intervention model, there are not enough years of proven success to justify the spending on an SIB. Additionally, data collection for homelessness programming needs to be standardized between all relevant partners. The framework for an SIB exists in Arizona, but needs a few more years of development before it can be considered.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

133671-Thumbnail Image.png

Self-Esteem, Dietary Habits, and Perception of Body Image Among the Homeless Population

Description

Since underserved individuals do not have a steady supply of food, this study explored whether their standards of what they view as healthy differs from individuals who can afford a

Since underserved individuals do not have a steady supply of food, this study explored whether their standards of what they view as healthy differs from individuals who can afford a basic living that includes food and shelter. Data collection from surveys provided information to see whether the struggles of obtaining food affects what is perceived as healthy, and whether there is a difference in dietary habits, perception of body image, and self-esteem. Homeless individuals displayed that they were more aware than non-homeless individuals that the food they were consuming was unhealthy. They were also less satisfied with their daily food diet, as most of them wished that they ate greater quantities of certain foods. Their daily food intake did confirm that they consumed more unhealthy food that lacked nutrition compared to non-homeless individuals. They also generally believed that thicker body images were healthier and more attractive compared to non-homeless people who thought that thinner body images were healthier and attractive. Homeless people also generally ranked lower on the body image scale than the image they thought was most desirable and healthy. This revealed a lack of satisfaction with their own current body. Additionally, the self-efficacy score displayed that homeless individuals generally scored lower for their self-esteem level compared to non-homeless people. This demonstrated that their daily struggles and lifestyle impacts their emotions and overall confidence.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

133793-Thumbnail Image.png

Composing Harmony: The Use of Music Therapy in a Homeless Shelter

Description

According to the National Center on Family Homelessness (2017), Homelessness affects 2.5 million children annually (n.p). Children who are exposed to homelessness many times also suffer from adverse childhood experiences

According to the National Center on Family Homelessness (2017), Homelessness affects 2.5 million children annually (n.p). Children who are exposed to homelessness many times also suffer from adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) which can hinder a younger person's development cognitively, socially, and can cause health problems such as heart disease later on in life. Examples of an ACE are death of a family member, witnessing or experiencing violence, economic hardship, or having a parent with a alcohol or drug addiction. About 70,000 of children in Arizona suffer from five or more ACEs. In this project music therapy interventions such as songwriting, lyric analysis, and recreative instrument play were used to address psychosocial needs for teens at a homeless shelter. The areas of psychosocial needs addressed in the music therapy group were: group cohesion, communication, and self regulation. Objectives were set each session in an eight week program to track progress of the above goals that were created based on the needs of the clients in this setting.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05