Matching Items (15)

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The Effect of Empowerment Literature on Perceptions of Gender Inequality

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Society has formed certain stereotypes surrounding genders and the roles that they play in society based on the qualities that each gender is assumed to have (Lopez & Ensari, 2014;

Society has formed certain stereotypes surrounding genders and the roles that they play in society based on the qualities that each gender is assumed to have (Lopez & Ensari, 2014; Eagly & Wood, 2012; Heilman, 2012). Leadership is seen as a masculine role because of the similar perceptions between what qualities men possess and what qualities leadership requires. (Koenig et al., 2011). Biases against women in leadership prevent women from successfully gaining high-level positions at the same rate as men, despite equal qualifications (Lopez & Ensari, 2014). There is great debate on how this problem can be resolved. On the one hand, trends toward institutional and policy changes in the 1970’s and 1980’s were intended to create greater equality and help women reduce bias in the workforce. More recently, however, the tone of the conversation has shifted. Books like Sheryl Sandberg’s “Lean In” have seen great popularity as they emphasize the role women have to combat bias through personal empowerment rather than waiting for the system to change. As a consequence of this shift in ideology, a possible shift has occurred in perceptions of where responsibility for change lies. This presents the question: Does exposure to empowerment literature increase perceptions of women’s responsibility to fix the gender inequality issue in the workplace?

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Personalized Medicine and the Concept of Empowerment

Description

With advances in biotechnology, personalized medicine has become an ever-expanding field. Even with so much growth, the critics equally match the proponents of personalized medicine. The source of their disagreement

With advances in biotechnology, personalized medicine has become an ever-expanding field. Even with so much growth, the critics equally match the proponents of personalized medicine. The source of their disagreement is rooted in the concept of empowerment. This analysis utilizes the personal genomics company 23andMe and their relationship with the Federal Food and Drug Administration to illustrate varying views of empowerment. Specifically, the case study focuses on the ability to provide direct-to-consumer health reports to patients independent of physicians. In doing this, larger issues of what is at stake in personalized medicine are uncovered. These include but are not limited to: who determines what individuals get empowered and what information is determined good versus bad.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Solidarity Not Charity: Organizing social services to promote empowerment

Description

Homelessness has grown throughout America, rendering the former stereotypes about the homeless largely inaccurate and invalid. In addition to this, poverty has grown despite the country's wealth. As such, social

Homelessness has grown throughout America, rendering the former stereotypes about the homeless largely inaccurate and invalid. In addition to this, poverty has grown despite the country's wealth. As such, social services have become increasingly relevant to the lives of more and more Americans. Rather than serve as punishment and reminders of one's own personal failures, these services need to empower their clients. This is most likely to be done from a place of solidarity, a horizontal orientation that recognizes that economic positions are subject to change and that instead favors human rights and unity. From this review of the literature, I argue that service groups with an ethic of solidarity or a horizontal orientation honor the dignity of the clients, something that is more likely to inspire positive changes. In addition, I will use the case study of the non-hierarchical service organization Food Not Bombs to demonstrate the importance of respecting the dignity and inherent rights of the clients.

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Date Created
  • 2015-12

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stillHUMAN: An Educational Empowerment Program

Description

The purpose of this creative project was to establish the foundation of an educational program that teaches financial literacy to the local homeless population. The name of this program is

The purpose of this creative project was to establish the foundation of an educational program that teaches financial literacy to the local homeless population. The name of this program is stillHUMAN. The project consisted of two parts, a needs analysis and a prototyping phase. The needs analysis was conducted at the Phoenix Rescue Mission Center, a faith-based homeless shelter that caters to male "clients", through written surveys and one-on-one interviews. Before interviewing the clients, the team acquired IRB approval as well as consent from the Center to carry out this study. These needs were then organized into a House of Quality. We concluded from Part 1 that we would need to create 3 - 7-minute-long video modules that would be available on an online platform and covered topics including professional development, budgeting, credit, and Internet literacy. In order to commence Part 2, each team member recorded a video module. These three videos collectively conveyed instruction regarding how to write a resume, use the Internet and fill out an application online, and how to budget money. These videos were uploaded to YouTube and shown to clients at Phoenix Rescue Mission, who were each asked to fill out a feedback survey afterwards. The team plans to use these responses to improve the quality of future video modules and ultimately create a holistic lesson plan that covers all financial literacy topics the clients desire. A website was also made to store future videos. The team plans to continue with this project post-graduation. Future tasks include creating and testing the a complete lesson plan, establishing a student organization at Arizona State University and recruiting volunteers from different disciplines, and creating an on-site tutoring program so clients may receive individualized attention. Once the lesson plan is demonstrated to be effective at Phoenix Rescue Mission, we plan to administer this lesson plan at other local homeless shelters and assess its efficacy in a non-faithbased and non-male environment. After a successful financial literacy program has been created, we aim to create lesson plans for other topics, including health literacy, human rights, and basic education. Ultimately stillHUMAN will become a sustainable program that unites the efforts of students and professionals to improve the quality of life of the homeless population.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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The influence of import substitution on community development as measured by economic wealth and quality of life

Description

The purpose of this research is to connect community development and local economic development to determine the impacts of the local economy on economic wealth and quality of life. This

The purpose of this research is to connect community development and local economic development to determine the impacts of the local economy on economic wealth and quality of life. This will be explored through a community development lens examining how the community, and its location and capitals (specifically economic, social and human capitals), impact the dependent capital variables. Laughlin’s (2012) research design of social capital and its impact on economic wealth used United States county samples, which reflect many local economies. This dissertation builds on Laughlin’s model and explores local economies at a Zip Code Tabulation Area (ZCTA) level. It also incorporates elements of Chaskin’s (2001) model, which explores community capacity as social and human capital, Benhabib and Spiegel’s (1994) human capital model, Levine and Renelt’s (1992) economic capital model, Krugman’s location and economic geography (1998), Emory and Flora’s community capital framework (2006), and concepts of quality of life and economic wealth by Schumacher (1964) and Jacobs, (1970). Economic wealth and higher quality of life can represent community development outcomes; there must be a balance within community systems and an exploration of these capitals (Emory and Flora, 2006).

This research expands beyond exploring impacts of social capital on economic wealth to include multiple community capitals. Furthermore, it tests economic measurements and their impact on a local economic level as opposed to a regional/state level, thus providing a deeper understanding of local economies and their impact on communities.

This dissertation provides a new baseline for understanding the relationship between community and economic development, its specific connections and the overall impacts of local economic activity. This will allow a richer exploration into economic activity and perspectives about how economic policy may impact communities. Research and literature has shown the immense advantages of strong local economies in contrast to regional/state economies and globalization; this will provide the necessary research bridge to connect with community development. The outcome of this research explains the impacts of economic, social and human capital on economic wealth and quality, specifically within local economies.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Women's Chant Group: Singing from our Souls

Description

This paper is an exploration of the potential benefits of an all-women’s chant group. A mixed-methods study using a Community Music Therapy approach informed by Feminist Music Therapy Theory

This paper is an exploration of the potential benefits of an all-women’s chant group. A mixed-methods study using a Community Music Therapy approach informed by Feminist Music Therapy Theory sheds light on the questions: How are individuals’ resilience affected by participation in a multi-session Women’s Chant Group? How does participation in a single-session Women’s Chant Group affect an individual’s mood? Which elements of a Women’s Chant Group are perceived to be the most important to the participants? No statistical significance was found in participants’ resiliency from the beginning to end of the study, although a higher sample size may yield more promising results. The Women’s Chant Group sessions demonstrated a considerable positive impact on the mood of the participants, specifically in reducing feelings of anxiety and increasing feelings of relaxation. Participants found the experience of creating aesthetic, complex, high-quality vocal music to be the most important element of the Women’s Chant Group. Recommendations are made for future research into the area of Women’s Chant Groups.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Feasibility Study of the Health Empowerment Intervention to Evaluate the Effect on Self-Management, Functional Health, and Well-Being in Older Adults with Heart Failure

Description

ABSTRACT

The population of older adults in the United States is growing disproportionately, with corresponding medical, social and economic implications. The number of Americans 65 years and older constitutes 13.7% of

ABSTRACT

The population of older adults in the United States is growing disproportionately, with corresponding medical, social and economic implications. The number of Americans 65 years and older constitutes 13.7% of the U.S. population, and is expected to grow to 21% by 2040. As the adults age, they are at risk for developing chronic illness and disability. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, and almost 80% of these are 65 years and older. The prevalence of heart failure will increase with the increase in aging population, thus increasing the costs associated with heart failure from 34.7 billion dollars in 2010 to 77.7 billion dollars by 2020. Of all cardiovascular hospitalizations, 28.9% are due to heart failure, and almost 60,000 deaths are accounted for heart failure. Marked disparities in heart failure persist within and between population subgroups. Living with heart failure is challenging for older adults, because being a chronic condition, the responsibility of day to day management of heart failure principally rests with patient. Approaches to improve self-management are targeted at adherence, compliance, and physiologic variables, little attention has been paid to personal and social contextual resources of older adults, crucial for decision making, and purposeful participation in goal attainment, representing a critical area for intervention. Several strategies based on empowerment perspective are focused on outcomes; paying less attention to the process. To address these gaps between research and practice, this feasibility study was guided by a tested theory, the Theory of Health Empowerment, to optimize self-management, functional health and well-being in older adults with heart failure. The study sample included older adults with heart failure attending senior centers. Specific aims of this feasibility study were to: (a) examine the feasibility of the Health Empowerment Intervention in older adults with heart failure, (b) evaluate the effect of the health empowerment intervention on self-management, functional health, and well-being among older adults with heart failure. The Health Empowerment Intervention was delivered focusing on strategies to identify and building upon self-capacity, and supportive social network, informed decision making and goal setting, and purposefully participating in the attainment of personal health goals for well-being. Study was feasible and significantly increased personal growth, and purposeful participation in the attainment of personal health goals.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Postfeminist distortions: complicated discourses of feminist identity, choice and sexuality

Description

In what has been coined the postfeminist era, successes of the second wave feminist movement have been distorted by sociopolitical and economic structures to proclaim that sexism and inequality no

In what has been coined the postfeminist era, successes of the second wave feminist movement have been distorted by sociopolitical and economic structures to proclaim that sexism and inequality no longer exist within liberal American society, and thus feminism as a movement is no longer necessary. While theoretical and quantitative work has examined women’s relationship with feminist identity, limited research exists on women’s subjective, qualitative accounts of feminist identity. Furthermore, there is a dearth of research on women’s subjective identification across the spectrum of feminist identity, particularly from non-college and non-white populations. Using thematic analysis this study critically analyzed 20 qualitative interviews from a community sample of women in a large Southwest city (Age range: 18-52; Mean age: 35.35, SD: 12.0). Narratives revealed four themes surrounding women’s identification with feminism and conceptions of sexuality: 1) Feminist self-labeling associated with a collective identity 2) Empowerment as a personal endeavor 3) Female empowerment and relationships with men and 4) Investments in femininity and sexual empowerment. This data supports the notion that feminist ideals of equality and agency have been distorted by postfeminist and neoliberal ideology to prevent women from identifying as feminists. Additionally, data postulate that this distortion has permeated ideologies of feminist women, thereby discouraging collective action for change.

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Date Created
  • 2017

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Siguiendo Las Huellas De La Chola En Bolivia: Levantamiento De Una Cartografía Cultural Alteña

Description

The surge of the chola alteña in Bolivia as a woman who, after being historically discriminated, has achieved her empowerment through her practices of resistance and agency is a very

The surge of the chola alteña in Bolivia as a woman who, after being historically discriminated, has achieved her empowerment through her practices of resistance and agency is a very particular and new phenomenon hardly studied. The contribution of this research is in principle to describe and discover the complexity of this occurrence, but at the same time to open a field of understanding the works of the chola as a preliminary input for alternative feminisms, in accordance to the particularity of each context. As a result, an eclectic perspective from different non-canonical theories stemming from the Americas has been adopted. For example, intersectionality stemming from various social, cultural, racial, and gender contexts is addressed by Kimberlé Crenshaw, Dora Inés Munévar, Ann Phoenix, Breny Mendoza y Sonia Montecinos. Research from Aníbal Quijano, Walter Mignolo and María Lugones proposes the decolonization of knowledge. From a Bolivian perspective, the proposal of communitarian feminism by Julieta Paredes and the chi’xi approach by Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui. At the same time, the documenting of the chola practices has been obtained from non-conventional digital and oral sources. Thus, this research becomes a referent for future feminist research about the chola, but also for understanding other movements and practices of subaltern and discriminated women in similar or different contexts.

The chola is characterized by her peculiar garment which was imposed by the colonizer in the XVIII century, nullifying her indigenous identity. However, this woman has continued to wear it to the present day as much as a tactic of resistance as of empowerment and agency and has transformed it into a current fashion for the valorization of her identity. She is a chi’xi subject who complements or antagonizes opposites without subsuming them. Finally, what guides her practices and strategies are her native cultural values, such as the principle of Living Well, cooperation, reciprocity, and godfatherhood.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Faculty perspectives on critical pedagogy and social justice

Description

In an attempt to gain a greater understanding of the interpretations and attitudes of higher education faculty in education programs teaching critical pedagogy, social justice, student empowerment and related concepts

In an attempt to gain a greater understanding of the interpretations and attitudes of higher education faculty in education programs teaching critical pedagogy, social justice, student empowerment and related concepts I conducted interviews with twenty faculty members in education programs in the New York City area. It is a study looking at the philosophies and conceptions of faculty and the relationship between those philosophies and their actions in the classroom. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed for trends and patterns. The nature of the questions focused on various aspects of critical pedagogy and allowed for an easy transition to preliminary categories based on the interview questions. The data was reviewed again for similarities and trends, and then again for comparison between the three identified perspectives: Professionalization Perspective, Democratic Student Development Perspective, and Critical Action Perspective.

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Date Created
  • 2015