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Arizona's Potential in Filmmaking: Why Arizona can, and should be a player in the movie industry

Description

The Film Industry is one of most exciting and informative businesses in the world, a business where the revenue of a single feature film can approach or exceed $1 billion. Current trends show a significant increase in independent production and

The Film Industry is one of most exciting and informative businesses in the world, a business where the revenue of a single feature film can approach or exceed $1 billion. Current trends show a significant increase in independent production and a demand for major studio facilities outside of California. Many states are meeting the demand by building state-of-the-art sound stages and production facilities. To further attract productions into their state, tax incentives and rebates are offered, resulting in a long-term influx of movie production that generates hundreds of millions of dollars of revenue for their communities, contributing an estimated $200,000 a day into the coffers of the localities where they film. In addition to the revenue it generates, the motion picture and television industries employ over 1.3 million Americans. Despite numerous benefits to states that cater to the movie industry, Arizona continues to flounder. With all the resources and advantages offered to Arizona including good weather and proximity to Hollywood, the state has the potential to become a key player within the film industry. The purpose of this study is to conduct interviews from industry professionals, both in and out of state, to get an idea of where Arizona stands in the movie making industry and if the state should take the steps necessary to build a more dominant presence. Using states like New Mexico as a model, comparisons will be made between different programs offered and implemented in both Arizona and other states. Data will be collected through induction of personal interviews and the responses gathered will be used to formulate a more formidable opinion on what Arizona is capable of doing within the movie making industry.

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Date Created
2019-12

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An Analysis of the Profitability of Hilton's 2007 Leveraged Buyout

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Leveraged buyouts have gone in and out of popularity over the last four decades. The first wave began in the 1980's with the rising popularity of junk bonds, followed by years of economic downturn, and then a rise and respective

Leveraged buyouts have gone in and out of popularity over the last four decades. The first wave began in the 1980's with the rising popularity of junk bonds, followed by years of economic downturn, and then a rise and respective fall from the dot com era. However, in the 2000's, attitudes were high and a period of low interest rates, covenant-lite loans, and relaxed lending conditions gave rise to some of the largest leveraged buyouts in US history. As the name implies, leveraged buyouts are predominantly structured with debt, around 70% of the total transaction value. Private equity firms execute leveraged buyouts on companies in strong industries, who have proven, stable cash flows, with the intent of cutting costs, divesting unneeded assets, and making the chain more efficient. After a time period of five to seven years, the private equity firm exits the deal through an initial public offering of the target company, a sale to another buyer, or dividend recapitalization. The Blackstone Group is one of the largest private equity firms in the US, and, with the favorable leveraged buyout conditions, especially in the real estate market, it wanted to build its real estate portfolio with an acquisition of Hilton Hotels & Resorts. At the time of consideration, Hilton was one of the largest hotel companies in the world, but was beginning to lag compared to its competitors Marriott and Starwood. After months of talks, Hilton agreed to be bought out by Blackstone at $47.50/share, for a total purchase price of $26bn. Blackstone had injected $5.7 of its own equity into the deal. The Great Recession caused a lot of investors to worry about Hilton's debt obligations, and Blackstone was able to restructure a significant portion of the debt to benefit both themselves and their creditors. As new CEO, Christopher J. Nassetta was able to strengthen Hilton by rearranging management, increasing franchising fees, expanding its capital-lite segments, and building more rooms internationally, Hilton was able to grow quicker than its competitors from 2007-2013 while minimizing operating expenses. On December 2, 2013, Hilton went public on the NYSE as HLT. Its enterprise value increased from $26bn to $33bn, and Blackstone was able to achieve an internal rate of return of 19%, while continuing to own 75% of Hilton's shares.

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Date Created
2017-05

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WPC 101: Ethics Curriculum

Description

At a time when the national and world community is viewing collegiate business programs as complicit in many recent business scandals rooted in ethical violations and breaches of trust, improving ethics education is a high priority. Review of current research

At a time when the national and world community is viewing collegiate business programs as complicit in many recent business scandals rooted in ethical violations and breaches of trust, improving ethics education is a high priority. Review of current research on techniques for effectively teaching ethics highlights the importance of incorporating conversational learning, decision models, and relevant, personalized case discussions into undergraduate ethics lessons. Focusing exclusively on ethics education in the first-year business seminar WPC 101, we evaluated the current ethics/academic integrity module and found it to be lacking many research-supported techniques. To develop an updated curriculum, we first used the EthicsGame Ethical Lens Inventory in a survey of 114 W. P. Carey students to explore whether a connection between students' majors and primary ethical lenses would demonstrate the effectiveness of designing different, tailored ethics curricula for students in each major. Regression analysis of the survey responses indicated that this research was inconclusive for every major except for Accountancy, which already has a specific (upper-division) ethics course. This initial research stage led to the creation of a universally applicable ethics curriculum based on the Baird Decision Model. Incorporating techniques from the literature review, the new WPC 101 Academic Honesty & Ethics curriculum includes a presentation on the Baird Decision Model, a small-group discussion of a relevant ethical dilemma, and a class role play. The curriculum additionally includes detailed Facilitator Guidelines for educators. The curriculum was piloted in WPC 101 classes during Spring 2016, and we present student and facilitator feedback as well as suggestions for further research and improvement. Use of this research-backed curriculum and further study into its impact on student decision making will allow W. P. Carey to continue advancing in pursuit of training students to be effective ethical leaders.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Scandal: An Ethics Game on the Importance of Accurate GAAP and FASB Reporting for Public Corporations

Description

Financial statements are one of the most important, if not the most important, documents for investors. These statements are prepared quarterly and yearly by the company accounting department, and are then audited in detail by a large external accounting firm.

Financial statements are one of the most important, if not the most important, documents for investors. These statements are prepared quarterly and yearly by the company accounting department, and are then audited in detail by a large external accounting firm. Investors use these documents to determine the value of the company, and trust that the company was truthful in its statements, and the auditing firm correctly audited the company's financial statements for any mistakes in their books and balances. Mistakes on a company's financial statements can be costly. However, financial fraud on the statements can be outright disastrous. Penalties for accounting fraud can include individual lifetime prison sentences, as well as company fines for billions of dollars. As students in the accounting major, it is our responsibility to ensure that financial statements are accurate and truthful to protect ourselves, other stakeholders, and the companies we work for. This ethics game takes the stories of Enron, WorldCom, and Lehman Brothers and uses them to help students identify financial fraud and how it can be prevented, as well as the consequences behind unethical decisions in financial reporting. The Enron scandal involved CEO Kenneth Lay and his predecessor Jeffery Skilling hiding losses in their financial statements with the help of their auditing firm, Arthur Andersen. Enron collapsed in 2002, and Lay was sentenced to 45 years in prison with his conspirator Skilling sentenced to 24 years in prison. In the WorldCom scandal, CEO Bernard "Bernie" Ebbers booked line costs as capital expenses (overstating WorldCom's assets), and created fraudulent accounts to inflate revenue and WorldCom's profit. Ebbers was sentenced to 25 years in prison and lost his title as WorldCom's Chief Executive Officer. Lehman Brothers took advantage of a loophole in accounting procedure Repo 105, that let the firm hide $50 billion in profits. No one at Lehman Brothers was sentenced to jail since the transaction was technically considered legal, but Lehman was the largest investment bank to fail and the only large financial institution that was not bailed out by the U.S. government.

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Date Created
2016-05

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A Look into the Operations of Two Nonprofit Organizations on Opposite Sides of the World

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This thesis will analyze the operations of two nonprofit organizations located in different parts of the world. One local and one international nonprofit organization was chosen for this thesis/creative project because of the diverse culture, customs and regulations in each

This thesis will analyze the operations of two nonprofit organizations located in different parts of the world. One local and one international nonprofit organization was chosen for this thesis/creative project because of the diverse culture, customs and regulations in each setting. The paper will discuss the operations of St. Vincent de Paul, the Chandler Conference of St. Vincent de Paul, and Sri Sai Darshan Trust (SSDT). The paper begins with a brief history of nonprofit organizations followed by a detailed background on both organizations. The management (organizational structure), finances, marketing, and legalities will be discussed of each nonprofit. The paper will then examine the specialized projects of each organization throughout the year. A PEST, SWOT, value chain, Kraljic, spend, and demand analysis were conducted based off of the research on each nonprofit. The paper will then discuss the problems each organization exhibits and the potential solutions the nonprofits can implement into their daily operations in order to resolve them. This section analyzes the similarities and differences within each business area of the nonprofit organization. Short-term solutions to current business problems and long-term solutions to organizational problems will be discussed in this section. The conclusion is the final element of the thesis. In this section, a balanced scorecard will be created for each nonprofit organization. In addition, the authors will discuss what they learned throughout the entire process. The goal of this thesis/creative project was to integrate the knowledge and concepts from business (marketing, finance, management, accounting, supply chain management, and computer information systems), and find an application for each within nonprofit organizations around the world.

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Date Created
2016-05

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A Study of League Influence on the Overall Health and Perceptions of Major League Baseball and the National Football League

Description

We were driven by the question: what is happening to the popularity of Major League Baseball? In order to answer this question we compared the league structure of Major League Baseball with that of the National Football League. We were

We were driven by the question: what is happening to the popularity of Major League Baseball? In order to answer this question we compared the league structure of Major League Baseball with that of the National Football League. We were able to speak with five former or current members of the respective leagues in order to gain some insight into how the two leagues operate. The main focus of our research was around the payroll structures of the two leagues as well as their revenue sharing policies. In the end, we discovered that Major League Baseball is becoming highly regionalized. The sport is still growing in popularity in terms of revenue and fan involvement, but it is becoming less popular on a national stage. The league is benefitting greatly from factors like the increasing importance of "TiVo proof programming" and a lack of competition. Each league is very different in its own right. While the NFL promotes a perception of competitive balance, Major League Baseball can be plagued by the negative perception it creates surrounding some of its smaller market teams.

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Date Created
2015-05

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Company X Supplier Financial Health Model

Description

Company X is one of the world's largest manufacturer of semiconductors. The company relies on various suppliers in the U.S. and around the globe for its manufacturing process. The financial health of these suppliers is vital to the continuation of

Company X is one of the world's largest manufacturer of semiconductors. The company relies on various suppliers in the U.S. and around the globe for its manufacturing process. The financial health of these suppliers is vital to the continuation of Company X's business without any material interruption. Therefore, it is in Company X's interest to monitor its supplier's financial performance. Company X has a supplier financial health model currently in use. Having been developed prior to watershed events like the Great Recession, the current model may not reflect the significant changes in the economic environment due to these events. Company X wants to know if there is a more accurate model for evaluating supplier health that better indicates business risk. The scope of this project will be limited to a sample of 24 suppliers representative of Company X's supplier base that are public companies. While Company X's suppliers consist of both private and public companies, the used of exclusively public companies ensures that we will have sufficient and appropriate data for the necessary analysis. The goal of this project is to discover if there is a more accurate model for evaluating the financial health of publicly traded suppliers that better indicates business risk. Analyzing this problem will require a comprehensive understanding of various financial health models available and their components. The team will study best practice and academia. This comprehension will allow us to customize a model by incorporating metrics that allows greater accuracy in evaluating supplier financial health in accordance with Company X's values.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Exploring Undergraduate Admissions through the Development of Shadowing Programs

Description

The thesis titled "Exploring Undergraduate Admissions through the Development of Shadowing Programs" is an organizational study and analysis of a shadowing program developed by Krista Moller, Ryan Johnson, and Kean Thomas. It resulted in the creation of a 25+ person

The thesis titled "Exploring Undergraduate Admissions through the Development of Shadowing Programs" is an organizational study and analysis of a shadowing program developed by Krista Moller, Ryan Johnson, and Kean Thomas. It resulted in the creation of a 25+ person student organization in the W.P. Carey School of Business called "Explore". The organization received backing and support from the admissions department in W.P. Carey, notably Dean of Admissions, Timothy Desch. The organization's members (titled "ambassadors") host a high school student interested in the business school for a day of class. High school students are matched with an ambassador based on majors they might be interested in, and ideally the result of the day of shadowing is the high school student having a better understanding of the opportunities available at W.P. Carey. The organization began in the fall of 2013, and was intended to be used as a thesis project from its inception. As a result, the founder's experiences were carefully documented and this allowed for a detailed analysis to take place. The analysis delves into the difficulties faced by the organization's members and executive board as a result of internal and external influences. The successes and experiences they were fortunate enough to have are also detailed, and plans for the organization's future are included as well. In addition, the Explore program is analyzed in comparison to other programs around the country and even in Canada, with the goal being to see where we could potentially strengthen our program. The founders of the Explore program (and authors of this thesis) hope other students might learn from it so that more programs such as Explore can be created, benefiting the local community and ASU itself.

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Date Created
2015-12

Socks + Boxers: A Unique Shopping Experience for Men's Socks and Underwear

Description

Socks + Boxers began as a simple idea on a trip through Victoria's Secret as a solution to the lack of choice in quality and affordable undergarments for men. Currently, there is no central hub for men's socks and underwear.

Socks + Boxers began as a simple idea on a trip through Victoria's Secret as a solution to the lack of choice in quality and affordable undergarments for men. Currently, there is no central hub for men's socks and underwear. Customers shopping for men's undergarments have few choices currently: purchase an inexpensive, average quality, predetermined pack of Hanes, Fruit of the Loom, or other common undergarment brand from a store like Walmart or Target; shop for individual pieces of expensive designer underwear at a high-end department store such as Nordstrom; or, finally, purchase slightly above average quality, but fairly expensive, brand name undergarments at physical stores such as American Eagle, Urban Outfitters, or Abercrombie & Fitch, or online stores such as MeUndies. Socks + Boxers seeks to combine the accessibility and reliability of common undergarment brands, the quality and luxury-feel of high-end undergarments, and the concept of choice provided by stores that sell men's undergarment lines into a single business. We also plan to tap into the booming subscription services industry and create a way for customers to easily update and replenish their undergarment wardrobe on a regular basis with exactly what they want. In order to start out on the right foot and begin developing this business plan from the ground up, we began researching and developing a Business Model Canvas, a tool that breaks out necessary pieces of a successful business plan into easy to understand blocks. We took a critical look at the problem at hand, its potential solutions, the value the solutions provide, how we plan to start, grow, and nourish our customer base, and much more. The different pieces of this business model puzzle all come together in the following pages.

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Date Created
2016-05

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A Study on Occupational Fraud within Small Businesses

Description

The main goal of this study was to understand the awareness of small business owners regarding occupational fraud, meaning fraud committed from within an organization. A survey/questionnaire was used to gather insight into the knowledge and perceptions of small business

The main goal of this study was to understand the awareness of small business owners regarding occupational fraud, meaning fraud committed from within an organization. A survey/questionnaire was used to gather insight into the knowledge and perceptions of small business owners, while also obtaining information about the history of fraud and the internal controls within their business. Twenty-four owners of businesses with less than 100 employees participated in the study. The results suggest that small business owners overestimate their knowledge regarding internal controls and occupational fraud, while also underestimating the risk of fraud within their own business. In fact, 92% of participants were not at all familiar with the popular Internal Control \u2014 Integrated Framework published by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. The results also show that small business owners tend to overestimate the protection provided by their currently implemented controls in regard to their risk of fraud. Overall, through continued knowledge of internal controls and occupational fraud, business owners can better protect their businesses from the risk of occupational fraud by increasing their awareness of fraud.

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Date Created
2014-05