Matching Items (6)

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Exploring communal coping: witnessing the process of empowerment unfold during shared medical appointments

Description

Chronic illness can be a stressful experience that requires coping and support. In the last twenty years, Shared Medical Appointments (SMAs) were developed in U.S. healthcare as a response to

Chronic illness can be a stressful experience that requires coping and support. In the last twenty years, Shared Medical Appointments (SMAs) were developed in U.S. healthcare as a response to the rising rates and challenges of chronic disease management. Due to the infancy of the SMA model, however, little is known or understood about the benefits of group medical care for patients. To date, scholars have not explored or systematically observed the communicative aspects of the SMA model. Communal coping, a theoretical framework that foregrounds group interaction and communication, offers a pragmatic lens for exploring how patients collectively cope with the stressors of chronic illness in the context of SMAs. Using qualitative methods, I conducted participant observation of SMAs at a Veterans Affairs hospital to analyze the communicative, transactional nature of communal coping as it unfolded among heart failure patients, family members, and providers in context. I also conducted interviews with SMA attendees. Analysis is based on 56 hours of fieldwork and 14 hours of interviews. Findings of this dissertation revealed group members who attended heart failure SMAs engaged in communal coping to manage the stressors of chronic illness. Group members moved through four primary phases of the communal coping process: (1) establish a communal coping orientation; (2) discuss shared stressors; (3) engage in cooperative action; and (4) practice communal reflexivity. Findings suggest patients become empowered by group interaction during SMAs as they move through each phase of the communal coping process. This dissertation also highlights various communicative strategies providers' use during SMAs to facilitate communal coping and group interaction. Theoretically, this dissertation expands upon existing knowledge of communal coping by exploring how individuals embody and socially construct the communal coping process. Specifically, this dissertation extends past models of communal coping with the addition of the communal reflexivity phase and through conceptualizing communal coping as a facilitated process of empowerment. Pragmatically, this research also offers insight to the benefits patients derive from attending SMAs, such as reduced feelings of stigma and isolation and improved motivation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Medicalizing childhood: pediatrics, public health, and children's hospitals in nineteenth-century Paris and London

Description

During the nineteenth century, children's physical health became a dominant theme in France and Great Britain, two of Europe's pediatric pioneers. This dissertation examines how British and French doctors, legislators,

During the nineteenth century, children's physical health became a dominant theme in France and Great Britain, two of Europe's pediatric pioneers. This dissertation examines how British and French doctors, legislators, hospital administrators, and social reformers came to see the preservation of children's physical health as an object of national and international concern. Medical knowledge and practice shaped, and was shaped by, nineteenth-century child preservation activities in France and Great Britain, linking medicine, public health, and national public and private efforts to improve the health of nations, especially that of their future members. Children's hospitals played a significant role in this process by promoting child health; preventing and combating childhood diseases; fostering pediatric professionalization and specialization; and diffusing medical-based justifications for child welfare reforms in the second half of the century. This deeply contextualized tale of two hospitals, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London (1852) and Sainte-Eugénie in Paris (1855), traces a crescendo in the interest, provision, and advocacy for children's medical care over time: from foundling homes and dispensaries to specialized hospitals with convalescent branches and large outpatient clinics. As a comparative study of the medicalization of children's bodies between 1820 and 1890, this dissertation also investigates the transnational exchange of medical ideas, institutions, and practices pertaining to child health between France and Great Britain during a period of nation-building. Specialized pediatric institutions in Paris and London built upon and solidified local, national, and international interests in improving and preserving child health. Despite great differences in their hospital systems, French and British children's hospital administrators and doctors looked to one another as partners, models, and competitors. Nineteenth-century French and British concerns for national public health, and child health in particular, had important distinctions and parallels, but medical, institutional, and legislative developments related to these concerns were not isolated activities, but rather, tied to transnational communication, cooperation, and competition.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Adoption and use of social media among registered dietitians nationwide: implications for health communication

Description

Currently, there has been limited research on evaluating the social media use and

competency level of registered dietitian
utritionists (RD/N). With health information increasingly sought on social media, it is imperative

Currently, there has been limited research on evaluating the social media use and

competency level of registered dietitian
utritionists (RD/N). With health information increasingly sought on social media, it is imperative to understand the social media competency of health professionals. The social media use, reach, and competency level of a nationwide RD/N sample was assessed utilizing an online survey. The sample (n=500) while mostly female (97%) was representative of RD/Ns compared to the nationwide statistics from the Commission on Dietetic Registration. The sample included RD/Ns from forty-six states with California (n=44), New York (n=42), and Texas (n=34) having the largest proportion of respondents. The majority of RD/Ns engage in social media for personal use (92.4%) and 39.2% engage for professional use. One hundred and twenty-five RD/Ns reported 777 ± 1063 (mean ± SD) social media followers. As compared to non-millennial RD/Ns, millennial RD/Ns engaged significantly more in social media for personal and professional use (+10% and +13.5% respectively, p<0.001) and scored significantly higher for social media competency (p<0.001). Additionally, food and nutrition management and consultant/private practice/industry RD/Ns had significantly higher competency scores than clinical RD/Ns (p=0.015 and p=0.046, respectively). RD/Ns who use social media personally and professionally had a significantly higher competency score than RD/Ns who did not (p<0.001). There were significant associations of Facebook, Twitter, total followers and total average followers with the social media competency score (r=0.265, 0.404, 0.338, & 0.320, respectively) in RD/Ns. Specifically, the social media competency score, was found to explain 16% of the variation in the number of Twitter followers and 10% of the variation in the average number of followers by platform. These data suggest an opportunity to increase RD/Ns’ social media reach (i.e. following) by improving competency level.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017