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Bayesian networks and gaussian mixture models in multi-dimensional data analysis with application to religion-conflict data

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This thesis examines the application of statistical signal processing approaches to data arising from surveys intended to measure psychological and sociological phenomena underpinning human social dynamics. The use of signal

This thesis examines the application of statistical signal processing approaches to data arising from surveys intended to measure psychological and sociological phenomena underpinning human social dynamics. The use of signal processing methods for analysis of signals arising from measurement of social, biological, and other non-traditional phenomena has been an important and growing area of signal processing research over the past decade. Here, we explore the application of statistical modeling and signal processing concepts to data obtained from the Global Group Relations Project, specifically to understand and quantify the effects and interactions of social psychological factors related to intergroup conflicts. We use Bayesian networks to specify prospective models of conditional dependence. Bayesian networks are determined between social psychological factors and conflict variables, and modeled by directed acyclic graphs, while the significant interactions are modeled as conditional probabilities. Since the data are sparse and multi-dimensional, we regress Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) against the data to estimate the conditional probabilities of interest. The parameters of GMMs are estimated using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. However, the EM algorithm may suffer from over-fitting problem due to the high dimensionality and limited observations entailed in this data set. Therefore, the Akaike information criterion (AIC) and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) are used for GMM order estimation. To assist intuitive understanding of the interactions of social variables and the intergroup conflicts, we introduce a color-based visualization scheme. In this scheme, the intensities of colors are proportional to the conditional probabilities observed.

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Date Created
  • 2012

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Efficient Bayesian tracking of multiple sources of neural activity: algorithms and real-time FPGA implementation

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Electrical neural activity detection and tracking have many applications in medical research and brain computer interface technologies. In this thesis, we focus on the development of advanced signal processing algorithms

Electrical neural activity detection and tracking have many applications in medical research and brain computer interface technologies. In this thesis, we focus on the development of advanced signal processing algorithms to track neural activity and on the mapping of these algorithms onto hardware to enable real-time tracking. At the heart of these algorithms is particle filtering (PF), a sequential Monte Carlo technique used to estimate the unknown parameters of dynamic systems. First, we analyze the bottlenecks in existing PF algorithms, and we propose a new parallel PF (PPF) algorithm based on the independent Metropolis-Hastings (IMH) algorithm. We show that the proposed PPF-IMH algorithm improves the root mean-squared error (RMSE) estimation performance, and we demonstrate that a parallel implementation of the algorithm results in significant reduction in inter-processor communication. We apply our implementation on a Xilinx Virtex-5 field programmable gate array (FPGA) platform to demonstrate that, for a one-dimensional problem, the PPF-IMH architecture with four processing elements and 1,000 particles can process input samples at 170 kHz by using less than 5% FPGA resources. We also apply the proposed PPF-IMH to waveform-agile sensing to achieve real-time tracking of dynamic targets with high RMSE tracking performance. We next integrate the PPF-IMH algorithm to track the dynamic parameters in neural sensing when the number of neural dipole sources is known. We analyze the computational complexity of a PF based method and propose the use of multiple particle filtering (MPF) to reduce the complexity. We demonstrate the improved performance of MPF using numerical simulations with both synthetic and real data. We also propose an FPGA implementation of the MPF algorithm and show that the implementation supports real-time tracking. For the more realistic scenario of automatically estimating an unknown number of time-varying neural dipole sources, we propose a new approach based on the probability hypothesis density filtering (PHDF) algorithm. The PHDF is implemented using particle filtering (PF-PHDF), and it is applied in a closed-loop to first estimate the number of dipole sources and then their corresponding amplitude, location and orientation parameters. We demonstrate the improved tracking performance of the proposed PF-PHDF algorithm and map it onto a Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA platform to show its real-time implementation potential. Finally, we propose the use of sensor scheduling and compressive sensing techniques to reduce the number of active sensors, and thus overall power consumption, of electroencephalography (EEG) systems. We propose an efficient sensor scheduling algorithm which adaptively configures EEG sensors at each measurement time interval to reduce the number of sensors needed for accurate tracking. We combine the sensor scheduling method with PF-PHDF and implement the system on an FPGA platform to achieve real-time tracking. We also investigate the sparsity of EEG signals and integrate compressive sensing with PF to estimate neural activity. Simulation results show that both sensor scheduling and compressive sensing based methods achieve comparable tracking performance with significantly reduced number of sensors.

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  • 2013