Matching Items (4)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

149738-Thumbnail Image.png

A bilingual, bicultural interpreter and researcher navigates blurry boundaries and intersectionality

Description

A researcher reflects using a close reading of interview transcripts and description to share what happened while participating in multiple roles in a larger ethnographic study of the acculturation process of deaf students in kindergarten classrooms in three countries. The

A researcher reflects using a close reading of interview transcripts and description to share what happened while participating in multiple roles in a larger ethnographic study of the acculturation process of deaf students in kindergarten classrooms in three countries. The course of this paper will focus on three instances that took place in Japan and America. The analysis of these examples will bring to light the concept of taking on multiple roles, including graduate research assistant, interpreter, cultural mediator, and sociolinguistic consultant within a research project serving to uncover challenging personal and professional dilemmas and crossing boundaries; the dual roles, interpreter and researcher being the primary focus. This analysis results in a brief look at a thought provoking, yet evolving task of the researcher/interpreter. Maintaining multiple roles in the study the researcher is able to potentially identify and contribute "hidden" knowledge that may have been overlooked by other members of the research team. Balancing these different roles become key implications when interpreting practice, ethical boundaries, and participant research at times the lines of separation are blurred.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011

151069-Thumbnail Image.png

Mentoring working and novice ASL/English Interpreters

Description

The purpose of the research conducted and presented in this thesis is to explore mentoring programs for ASL/English Interpreters, with a focus on the question "Is a Peer Mentoring Program a successful approach to mentoring working and novice interpreter?" The

The purpose of the research conducted and presented in this thesis is to explore mentoring programs for ASL/English Interpreters, with a focus on the question "Is a Peer Mentoring Program a successful approach to mentoring working and novice interpreter?" The method of qualitative data collection was done via questionnaires and interviews with past participants of a Peer Mentoring Program and questionnaires to identified persons who have experience creating and running mentoring programs. The results of the data collection show that a Peer Mentoring Program is a successful approach to mentoring working and novice interpreters. This research provides valued information in regard to the experience of persons in a Peer Mentoring Program as well as successful aspects of such a mentoring approach.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

Student AIMS performance in a predominately Hispanic district

Description

ABSTRACT School districts in the United States have undergone large changes over the last decade to accommodate No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Arizona accommodated NCLB through Arizona's Instrument to Measure Standards (AIMS). Expectations were established for all students, varying by

ABSTRACT School districts in the United States have undergone large changes over the last decade to accommodate No Child Left Behind (NCLB). Arizona accommodated NCLB through Arizona's Instrument to Measure Standards (AIMS). Expectations were established for all students, varying by group of students based on grade, special education status, free/reduced lunch status, and English Language Learner (ELL) status. AIMS performance for subgroups has been scrutinized, due to the high stakes for schools and districts to meet expectations. This study is interested in the performance of ELL students, when compared with non-ELL students. The current study investigated AIMS performance of students in grades three through six from a large Arizona school district with predominantly low SES, Hispanic students. Approximately 90% of the students from this district were classified as ELL during their first year in the district. AIMS scores in Math and Reading were compared for ELL and non-ELL students across the years 2008, 2009, and 2010. Results suggest that there are differences in performance for ELL and non-ELL students, with ELL students scoring lower in both Math and Reading than non-ELL students. Additionally, ELL and non-ELL students showed similar performance across time in Math, with an increasing number of students Meeting or Exceeding the standards from year 2008 to 2009 for both ELL and non-ELL students. Student performance in Math for ELL and non-ELL students did not continue to improve from 2009 to 2010. On Reading performance, greater proportions of students scored as Meets or Exceeds across time for ELL students but not for non-ELL students. Non-ELL students scored at Meets or Exceeds at equal proportions across time, although non-ELL students scored at Meets or Exceeds in higher proportions than ELL students for all three years. Results suggest the need for continued research into the appropriateness of the AIMS for ELL students and more detailed comparisons of ELL and non-ELL students within and across districts with high proportions of ELL students.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2012

149634-Thumbnail Image.png

The effects of curriculum-based measures on elementary math achievement

Description

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 has had significant ramifications across public education. Due to reporting mandates, schools and districts are being held publicly accountable for the academic performance and progress of all students. Since implementation of the

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 has had significant ramifications across public education. Due to reporting mandates, schools and districts are being held publicly accountable for the academic performance and progress of all students. Since implementation of the law, much attention has been focused on the "achievement gap," that is, any differences in performance between groups of students. Students associated with the achievement gap typically come from certain demographics: minorities, low-income families, students with disabilities, and students with limited English proficiency (English Language Learners). The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of using curriculum-based measures (CBMs) on math achievement, particularly ELL students. Eight elementary schools in northwestern New Mexico, divided into two groups (control and experimental) of four schools each, used the same state-approved, core math curriculum, were compared using a quasi-experimental research design. In addition to the regular core curricular materials, the experimental schools were provided with weekly CBMs, containing sample questions developed from the state's performance standards. Each weekly CBM included at least one question from each of the five broad math strands: number and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and data and probability. Fourth (N = 283) and fifth grade (N = 294) students who had continuous enrollment for the duration of the experiment served as subjects. Successive regular administrations of the New Mexico Standards Based Assessment math subtest served as the pre- and posttest measures. Analysis of covariance tests, with the pretest as the covariate, revealed no significant treatment effects for either the fourth or fifth grade students through the use of CBMs as a supplement to the core math curriculum. The significant effects, supported by previous research, were the school and, especially, the teacher for both grades. In this study, the effects of the classroom teacher were of more importance to student achievement than either the school a child attended or what curriculum program or process a given school employed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2011