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Paying to Publish: Open Access Author Fees and Libraries’ Initiative to Fund Publishing Costs

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To pay associated publishing costs with Open Access (OA), academic libraries are providing researchers affiliated with the university the funds necessary to publish in OA journals. Structured to reimburse the author fees for a researcher’s accepted manuscript to an

To pay associated publishing costs with Open Access (OA), academic libraries are providing researchers affiliated with the university the funds necessary to publish in OA journals. Structured to reimburse the author fees for a researcher’s accepted manuscript to an OA journal; these funds support the dissemination of scholarship and promote the benefits of OA. With numerous academic libraries in the United States operating a fund to pay publishing costs, librarians are adapting their strategies for addressing popular demand from researchers by reevaluating submission criteria; specifically prioritizing based on need for young researchers in adjunct positions or doctoral candidates and reducing financial expenditure per researcher to expand allocation to additional people.

The essay seeks to effectively identify and compare strategies used by libraries throughout the United States. Beyond analyzing the structure of author funds, the essay explores the value of such programs in promoting OA values of not only free to read, but free to publish. Asking the question, are libraries best suited to expend resources by paying publishing fees and does it achieve its purpose of promoting OA journals? Overall, the essay outlines the role of OA in expanding the potential for libraries to develop its role in scholarly publishing; particularly by promoting researchers’ publications in OA journals using author funds.

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Date Created
2016-09

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Keeping up With...Patron Driven Acquisitions

Description

Keeping Up With… is an online current awareness publication from the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) featuring concise briefs on trends in academic librarianship and higher education. Each edition focuses on a single issue including an introduction to

Keeping Up With… is an online current awareness publication from the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) featuring concise briefs on trends in academic librarianship and higher education. Each edition focuses on a single issue including an introduction to the topic and summaries of key points, including implications for academic libraries. © Copyright 1997-2014, American Library AssociationThis document may be reprinted and distributed for non-commercial and educational purposes only, and not for resale. No resale use may be made of material on this website at any time. All other rights reserved. || Historically, approaches to collection development in libraries relied on the subjective determination of librarians or outside vendors to select the material most suitable to address patron needs. Favoring broad strokes, acquisition policy relied on major publishers and sought to cover general subject areas. Several factors prompted a shift in approach to collection development, including reductions to staffing and budgets, but more importantly technological advancements and the proliferation of e-books caused the reevaluation of the resources patrons accessed and whether the collection accomplished its goal of satisfying their needs. The practice of patron driven acquisition (PDA) refines the broad strokes of acquisition to directly address the demands of patrons while managing costs by purchasing high use material, renting sparsely used titles and paying nothing for titles with no demand.

PDA involves the inclusion of bibliographic records to the catalog for titles the library does not own and permits the patron an opportunity to initiate a purchase. Beyond the practical implications of managing costs and liberating staff time, the PDA model provides patrons easier and quicker access to the widest range of information possible. The service model of populating a collection to protect against the possibility of patrons requiring access is increasingly unsustainable. Although not without its challenges, allowing the patron to provide a collaborative role with librarians in developing a collection serves to manage costs and streamlines the process of creating a collection which best addresses the needs of a constituency.

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Created

Date Created
2014-06

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Who's Doing Systematic Reviews?: A Descriptive Analysis

Description

Background & Objective:
Over the past several decades, systematic reviews have become a major part of the biomedical research literature landscape. While systematic reviews were originally developed for medicine and its related fields, they are now published in other disciplines.

Background & Objective:
Over the past several decades, systematic reviews have become a major part of the biomedical research literature landscape. While systematic reviews were originally developed for medicine and its related fields, they are now published in other disciplines. Our initial goal was to broadly investigate and describe the non-health sciences subject areas and disciplines that are publishing systematic reviews. Specifically, our research questions were,“What disciplines outside of the health sciences are adopting systematic reviews as a research method?” and “What implications may this have for health sciences librarianship?” Based on our initial findings, we will propose avenues for future research.

Methods & Discussion:
We conducted a search in the Scopus database to serve as a representative sample of the research literature. We searched for the phrase “systematic review*” in the article title or abstract, and limited the results to review articles from journals. We filtered out articles published in health sciences disciplines using the Scopus subject categories, and examined the articles that remained. The resulting set of titles was screened by two independent reviewers in a stepwise fashion. First we read the titles, then the abstracts, then the full text of remaining articles to determine if each was a systematic review and addressed a topic outside of the health sciences. We reconciled any differences for citations on which there was not initial consensus between reviewers. Lastly, we examined each remaining article to categorize its subject area or discipline. Our initial search included a number of systematic reviews outside the health science disciplines, and will yield data that has implications for librarians in the health sciences and in disciplines outside the health sciences field.

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Date Created
2018-01-22

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Finding Consumer Health Information: Resources & Strategies to Alleviate the Pain

Description

Do your library users, friends, or family look to you for help locating reliable, timely, and easy to understand consumer health information? Sifting through the large amounts of health information and misinformation available online can prove difficult for even the

Do your library users, friends, or family look to you for help locating reliable, timely, and easy to understand consumer health information? Sifting through the large amounts of health information and misinformation available online can prove difficult for even the seasoned librarian much less a typical library user. This poster session will discuss the difficulties and potential pitfalls of consumer health reference and share resources and strategies to help improve interactions with consumer health questions.

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Created

Date Created
2013-11-07

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Investigating Systematic Reviews Outside Health Sciences

Description

Background & Objective:
Originally developed for medicine and related fields in support of evidence-based practice, systematic reviews (SRs) are now published in other fields. We investigated non-health sciences disciplines that are publishing systematic reviews.

Research questions:
“What disciplines outside the health

Background & Objective:
Originally developed for medicine and related fields in support of evidence-based practice, systematic reviews (SRs) are now published in other fields. We investigated non-health sciences disciplines that are publishing systematic reviews.

Research questions:
“What disciplines outside the health sciences are adopting systematic reviews?”
“How do systematic reviews outside the health sciences compare with health sciences systematic reviews?”

Methods:
We conducted a search in the Scopus database for articles with the phrase “systematic review*” in the title or abstract. We limited our results to review articles, and eliminated health science focused articles using the Scopus Subject area categories. Articles were examined by reviewers to determine if they a) were classified as SRs by the authors b) exhibited accepted characteristics of systematic reviews, such as a comprehensive search, adherence to a predetermined protocol, and assessment of bias and quality, and c) addressed a non-health sciences topic. We eliminated articles based on 1) title, 2) abstract, and finally 3) the full text of each article. We reconciled differences for articles on which there was not initial consensus, and grouped remaining articles according to Scopus subject areas.

Discussion:
We found a significant number of systematic reviews outside the health science disciplines, particularly in the physical and social sciences. We compared similarities as well as differences to the protocols and processes used in health sciences systematic reviews. These findings have implications for librarians both inside and outside the health sciences arena who participate in systematic review projects.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-06-07

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Developing a Digital Collection of Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Student Work

Description

Objectives: While PhD dissertations are typically accessible as part of a university library’s general collection, or as content within a proprietary database, many other terminal degree projects remain invisible and inaccessible to a greater audience. This poster will describe the

Objectives: While PhD dissertations are typically accessible as part of a university library’s general collection, or as content within a proprietary database, many other terminal degree projects remain invisible and inaccessible to a greater audience. This poster will describe the development and creation of a digital repository collection containing doctor of nursing practice (DNP) student’s final projects.

Methods: The “Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Final Projects Collection” was created over the course of one semester and included initial discussions with program faculty and administrators, the creation of a student consent form, the development of a process for adding student work to the repository collection, and a presentation to graduating students. This poster will describe the process in more detail, discuss benefits and challenges, as well as highlight the considerations to keep in mind when developing and creating a digital collection of student work. Additionally, best practices and lessons learned will also be described to provide valuable information to others considering creating this type of collection at their own institution.

Results: At the end of the first semester of implementation, twenty student projects existed in our public collection. On the whole, both faculty and students were pleased to have a collection highlighting the work being done in their program. Valuable lessons were learned that can be applied in the next semester of implementation. Specifically, metadata consistency was an issue during the initial uploading process. Gaining select faculty and student buy-in by allaying concerns related to some student’s wanting to publish in a peer-reviewed journal on the topic of their final project remains vital.

Conclusion: Creating open access collections of student applied final projects or capstone projects allows for greater visibility of this type of often overlooked student scholarship. Specifically, the final projects showcased can now be found and accessed by potential employers, researchers, other schools, and other DNP students. In many cases these final projects have applied real-world impact related to answering clinical questions or patient care that should be shared with the world.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05-30