Matching Items (5)

2021 March Mammal Madness Educational Materials

2021 March Mammal Madness Educational Materials

Description

This packet includes:

 2021 Bracket Common Name 

2021 Bracket Latin Binomial 

Bracket FAQ (English) 

Pre-Tournament Research Lesson Plan (English) 

Tournament Lesson Plan & Worksheets (English) 

Visual Arts Lesson Plan (English) 

Language Arts Lesson Plan (English) 

Guide for Youngest

This packet includes:

 2021 Bracket Common Name 

2021 Bracket Latin Binomial 

Bracket FAQ (English) 

Pre-Tournament Research Lesson Plan (English) 

Tournament Lesson Plan & Worksheets (English) 

Visual Arts Lesson Plan (English) 

Language Arts Lesson Plan (English) 

Guide for Youngest Players (English)

JUMBO Bracket for Youngest Players (English)

2021 Bracket Common Name (Spanish) 

Pre-Tournament Research Lesson Plan (Spanish) 

Tournament Lesson Plan & Worksheets (Spanish) 

Visual Arts Lesson Plan (Spanish)

Language Arts Lesson Plan (Spanish) 

JUMBO Bracket for Youngest Players (Spanish) 

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-02

Open Educational Resources from 2020 March Mammal Madness Tournament

2020 March Mammal Madness Educational Materials

Description

This packet includes:

2020 Bracket Common Name

2020 Bracket Latin Binomial

Pre-Tournament Research Lesson Plan (English)

Tournament Lesson Plan & Worksheets (English)

Visual Arts Lesson Plan (English)

Language Arts Lesson Plan (English)

2020 Bracket Common Name (Spanish)

Pre-Tournament Research Lesson Plan (Spanish)

Tournament Lesson Plan & Worksheets (Spanish)

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Stoichiometric producer-grazer models, incorporating the effects of excess food-nutrient content on grazer dynamics

Description

There has been important progress in understanding ecological dynamics through the development of the theory of ecological stoichiometry. This fast growing theory provides new constraints and mechanisms that can be

There has been important progress in understanding ecological dynamics through the development of the theory of ecological stoichiometry. This fast growing theory provides new constraints and mechanisms that can be formulated into mathematical models. Stoichiometric models incorporate the effects of both food quantity and food quality into a single framework that produce rich dynamics. While the effects of nutrient deficiency on consumer growth are well understood, recent discoveries in ecological stoichiometry suggest that consumer dynamics are not only affected by insufficient food nutrient content (low phosphorus (P): carbon (C) ratio) but also by excess food nutrient content (high P:C). This phenomenon, known as the stoichiometric knife edge, in which animal growth is reduced not only by food with low P content but also by food with high P content, needs to be incorporated into mathematical models. Here we present Lotka-Volterra type models to investigate the growth response of Daphnia to algae of varying P:C ratios. Using a nonsmooth system of two ordinary differential equations (ODEs), we formulate the first model to incorporate the phenomenon of the stoichiometric knife edge. We then extend this stoichiometric model by mechanistically deriving and tracking free P in the environment. This resulting full knife edge model is a nonsmooth system of three ODEs. Bifurcation analysis and numerical simulations of the full model, that explicitly tracks phosphorus, leads to quantitatively different predictions than previous models that neglect to track free nutrients. The full model shows that the grazer population is sensitive to excess nutrient concentrations as a dynamical free nutrient pool induces extreme grazer population density changes. These modeling efforts provide insight on the effects of excess nutrient content on grazer dynamics and deepen our understanding of the effects of stoichiometry on the mechanisms governing population dynamics and the interactions between trophic levels.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Investigating the influence of food on reproductive physiology and gonad growth: urbanization as a natural experiment

Description

For animals that experience annual cycles of gonad development, the seasonal timing (phenology) of gonad growth is a major adaptation to local environmental conditions. To optimally time seasonal gonad growth,

For animals that experience annual cycles of gonad development, the seasonal timing (phenology) of gonad growth is a major adaptation to local environmental conditions. To optimally time seasonal gonad growth, animals use environmental cues that forecast future conditions. The availability of food is one such environmental cue. Although the importance of food availability has been appreciated for decades, the physiological mechanisms underlying the modulation of seasonal gonad growth by this environmental factor remain poorly understood.

Urbanization is characterized by profound environmental changes, and urban animals must adjust to an environment vastly different from that of their non-urban conspecifics. Evidence suggests that birds adjust to urban areas by advancing the timing of seasonal breeding and gonad development, compared to their non-urban conspecifics. A leading hypothesis to account for this phenomenon is that food availability is elevated in urban areas, which improves the energetic status of urban birds and enables them to initiate gonad development earlier than their non-urban conspecifics. However, this hypothesis remains largely untested.

My dissertation dovetailed comparative studies and experimental approaches conducted in field and captive settings to examine the physiological mechanisms by which food availability modulates gonad growth and to investigate whether elevated food availability in urban areas advances the phenology of gonad growth in urban birds. My captive study demonstrated that energetic status modulates reproductive hormone secretion, but not gonad growth. By contrast, free-ranging urban and non-urban birds did not differ in energetic status or plasma levels of reproductive hormones either in years in which urban birds had advanced phenology of gonad growth or in a year that had no habitat-related disparity in seasonal gonad growth. Therefore, my dissertation provides no support for the hypothesis that urban birds begin seasonal gonad growth because they are in better energetic status and increase the secretion of reproductive hormones earlier than non-urban birds. My studies do suggest, however, that the phenology of key food items and the endocrine responsiveness of the reproductive system may contribute to habitat-related disparities in the phenology of gonad growth.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014