Matching Items (9)

Fad Diets and Evidence-Based Research: 3 Mini-Case Studies in Student-Driven How-To Research Sessions

Description

As a Health Sciences Librarian at a large public research university, requests for one off library sessions, or online how-to support, to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) research skills are common.

As a Health Sciences Librarian at a large public research university, requests for one off library sessions, or online how-to support, to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) research skills are common. Having mastered brief 'hands-on' activities to practice skills learned, I was ready to branch out, and so were some faculty with whom I work, especially in the fields of Nutrition, Exercise, and Wellness. For Spring 2013 I worked with faculty to try pre-class time assignments followed by participatory, hands-on, student reporting (flipped) class sessions on:

1. Finding the source of research reported in health news articles.
2. Identifying high level EBP research studies on a nutrition topic.
3. Exploring career and research tools in Kinesiology.

This session will include a brief overview of each case study with discussion opportunities.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05-13

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Investigation of Student Achievement and Attitude about a Flipped Classroom Using Linked Lecture Videos in Biomedical Engineering

Description

Flipped classrooms invert the traditional teaching methods and deliver the lecture online outside of the classroom. An increase in technology accessibility is increasing the prevalence of this teaching technique in

Flipped classrooms invert the traditional teaching methods and deliver the lecture online outside of the classroom. An increase in technology accessibility is increasing the prevalence of this teaching technique in universities. In this study, we aim to address some of the uncertainties of a flipped classroom by implementing a new lecture format in Transport Phenomena. Transport Phenomena is a junior level biomedical engineering course originally flipped in Spring 2013. Since transitioning to a flipped classroom, students have been required to watch 75-minute lectures outside of class where the instructor covered key concepts and examples using paper and marker on a document camera. In class, students then worked in groups to solve problems with instructor and teaching assistant feedback. Students also completed self-graded homework with the opportunity to earn lost points back by discussing fundamental misconceptions. We are introducing re-formatted mini lectures that contain the same content broken down as well as example problems worked out in a tutorial technique instead of traditional solving method. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of newly created mini lectures with integrated questions and links in terms of student achievement and attitude [interest, utility, and "cost" (time, effort, and emotion)].

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Effectiveness of Flipped Classroom for Mechanics of Materials

Description

The flipped classroom is a teaching method that flips the activities done in and out of class, i.e., concepts are learned out of class and problems are worked in class

The flipped classroom is a teaching method that flips the activities done in and out of class, i.e., concepts are learned out of class and problems are worked in class under the supervision of the instructor. Studies have indicated several benefits of the FC, including improved performance and engagement. In the past years, further studies have investigated the benefits of FC in statics, dynamics, and mechanics of materials courses and indicate similar performance benefits. However, these studies address a need for additional studies to validate their results due to the short length of their research or small classroom size. In addition, many of these studies do not measure student attitudes, such as self-efficacy, or the difference in time spent out of class on coursework. The objective of this research is to determine the effectiveness of the flipped classroom system (FC) in comparison to the traditional classroom system (TC) in a large mechanics of materials course. Specifically, it aims to measure student performance, student self-efficacy, student attitudes on lecture quality, motivation, attendance, hours spent out of class, practice, and support, and difference in impact between high, middle, and low achieving students. In order to accomplish this, three undergraduate mechanics of materials courses were analyzed during the spring 2015 semester. One FC section served as the experimental group (92 students), while the two TC sections served as the control group (125 students). To analyze student self-efficacy and attitudes, a survey instrument was designed to measure 18 variables and was administered at the end of the semester. Standardized core outcomes were compared between groups to analyze performance. This paper presents the specific course framework used in this FC, detailed results of the quantitative and qualitative analysis, and discussion of strengths and weaknesses. Overall, an overwhelming majority of students were satisfied with FC and would like more of their classes taught using FC. Strengths of this teaching method include greater confidence, better focus, higher satisfaction with practice in class and assistance received from instructors and peers, more freedom to express ideas and questions in class, and less time required outside of class for coursework. Results also suggest that this method has a greater positive impact on high and low achieving students and leads to higher performance. The criticisms made by students focused on lecture videos to have more worked examples. Overall, results suggest that FC is more effective than TC in a large mechanics of materials course.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

Supplemental Lecture Videos to Aide in the Transition from a Traditional Learning Environment to an Engaged Learning Environment

Description

Teaching methods in the present day are beginning to transition from the traditional lecture style to the flipped learning style. The flipped classroom, also known as an engaged learning classroom,

Teaching methods in the present day are beginning to transition from the traditional lecture style to the flipped learning style. The flipped classroom, also known as an engaged learning classroom, follows the model where students are presented with lecture material prior to attending class. Instead of being lectured in class, they work on applications of the material with the help of their peers and the instructional staff. One component that many engaged learning environments have in common is lecture videos for the students to view prior to attending class. An undergraduate civil engineering course at Arizona State University is modeled using an engaged learning environment; however, it does not provide lecture videos for the students. Many students in this course are seeing an engaged learning environment for the first time and need guidance on how to prepare for the course, how to approach course material, and how to interpret feedback, in addition to getting help in the technical concepts. This project aims to create supplemental lecture videos based on the concepts that students in the class identified as needing more information, as well as topics that will help students make this transition to an engaged learning environment. A series of sixteen videos were created and posted for the students to view prior to attending recitation periods. The feedback from the students regarding the videos was studied and implementation techniques for future semesters were tested.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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The British Origins of Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature

Description

The purpose of this honors thesis project is to explore the origins of science fiction and fantasy in British literature and develop a unit for a high school Freshman English

The purpose of this honors thesis project is to explore the origins of science fiction and fantasy in British literature and develop a unit for a high school Freshman English classroom. Focusing on science fiction and fantasy literature, technology, and literature circles, this is a complete unit in which all lesson plans, activities, and materials are derived from the PUHSD curriculum and support the AZ Career and College Readiness Standards. The design of this unit encourages analysis of literature and other medias as well as encouraging students to explore their own imaginations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Implementing Project Based Learning Through Flipped Classrooms

Description

Project Based Learning is a teaching strategy that engages students in content skills through real life questions that are aimed to drive students to explore possible solutions. The question is

Project Based Learning is a teaching strategy that engages students in content skills through real life questions that are aimed to drive students to explore possible solutions. The question is used as a driving force for all of their learning for that particular unit or question. This gives students concrete and engaging examples of how the content they are learning can relate to real life problems. All of the content is still aligned to grade level standards to insure that students are learning academic content. Project Based Learning can benefit students in a variety of different ways. Projects create a sense of meaning for students. They show students that their learning is all building towards a common and tangible goal. Projects also teach students invaluable cooperation skills. The development of these skills is crucial to support students in college and career readiness. Project Based Learning has been proven to work by increasing student learning and motivation. The projects are exciting and include many different concepts that students may not be familiar with from a traditional classroom setting. This can include but is not limited to creating a model, defending your ideas through discussion, presenting ideas to your community and much more. These methods of showing knowledge are not always incorporated into traditional classrooms, but are an essential aspect of Project Based Learning.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Development and Use of Instructional Multimedia to Enhance Student Comprehension of Fundamental Structural Analysis and Design Techniques

Description

In the Spring 2013 and Fall 2013 semesters, a survey was taken of students enrolled in the principal undergraduate civil engineering structures course, CEE 321: Structural Analysis and Design, to

In the Spring 2013 and Fall 2013 semesters, a survey was taken of students enrolled in the principal undergraduate civil engineering structures course, CEE 321: Structural Analysis and Design, to assess both the prevalence of technology in the lives of the students and the potential ways this information could be use to improve the educational experience. The results of this survey indicated that there was a considerable demand for additional online resources outside of the formal classroom. The students of CEE 321 requested online lecture videos in particular, and so a project was launched at the start of the Spring 2014 semester to deliver a large body of academic instructional videos. In total, a collection of 30 instructional videos which covered all key topics covered over a semester of CEE 321 was published. The driving interest behind this creative project is to increase the level of understanding, comfort, and performance in students enrolled in the class. Although the quantity of initial student feedback is relatively small, the reactions are distinctly positive and reflect an improvement in understanding amongst the responding students. Over the course of upcoming semesters, qualitative and quantitative assessments of the impact of the videos are expected to provide a better indication of their quality and effectiveness in supporting student comprehension and performance in CEE 321. Above all, the success of these videos is directly tied to their ability to function as living, adaptable resources which are continuously molded and improved by student feedback.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Instructional choices, student participation, and the construction of knowledge in a social studies learning environment

Description

The purpose of this action research study was to explore the impact instructional choices had on student participation in the classroom learning environment, growth of knowledge in social studies, and

The purpose of this action research study was to explore the impact instructional choices had on student participation in the classroom learning environment, growth of knowledge in social studies, and self-efficacy in the learning process. The instructional choices implemented through a flipped learning instructional approach were designed to target motivation and participation in the learning process via individualized student-learning opportunities. This action research study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of collaborative student-centered learning environments to traditional instructional style learning environments. This study provided students with opportunities to analyze, think critically of, and apply studied content in a Participation in Government course to their personal lives through experiential out-of-class assignments and collaborative hands-on in-class activities. The theoretical foundations for this study include social cognitive theory, theory of self-efficacy, and social constructivism. Participants included 32 high school seniors from the High School of Fashion Industries in New York, NY. Participants completed a pre-/post-self-efficacy survey, pre/posttest measuring their knowledge of government, and several short interviews. Eight participants, four from the Treatment group and four from the Control group, completed a semi-structured interview at the conclusion of the study. Results showed participants experienced an increase in self-efficacy and participation in the learning process. Participants from the Treatment group outperformed the participants from the Control group with regards to knowledge of government. In the discussion, outcomes related to the theoretical frameworks and the problem of practice were discussed. Finally, limitations and a discussion regarding future iterations of the action research in a larger context were outlined.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Collaborative language learning in higher education: student engagement and language self-efficacy in a communicative, flipped context

Description

The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how collaborative language learning activities affected student perceptions of their engagement and language self-efficacy in a communicative, flipped

The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how collaborative language learning activities affected student perceptions of their engagement and language self-efficacy in a communicative, flipped language learning classroom in higher education. The new online platforms accompanying many textbooks now allow students to prepare for classes ahead of time, allowing instructors to use more class time for student engagement in actual language practices. However, there has been little investigation of the effects of this communicative, flipped classroom model on students’ learning processes and outcomes. This mixed methods action research study revealed that the introduction of varied collaborative language learning activities had a positive impact on students’ self-efficacy and engagement as well as provides implications that will be of value to language educators interested in enhancing their use of the communicative, flipped classroom model.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019