Matching Items (39)

Building a Foundation for Lifelong Research: Emphasizing Open Access and Open Educational Resources in Allied Health Higher Education

Description

Objectives: Highlight top open access and open educational resources in health sciences and provide examples of their use in supporting higher education curriculum needs to respond to online, distance, flipped

Objectives: Highlight top open access and open educational resources in health sciences and provide examples of their use in supporting higher education curriculum needs to respond to online, distance, flipped classroom, and hybrid learning structures, and to ensure familiarity with lifelong continuing education and research resources for evidence-based practice in allied health fields.

Methods: "a student's education is only as valuable as the information that a student has access to" Matt Cooper (president of the National Association of Graduate and Professional Students, 2012). Evidence-based practice is no longer a new concept in health professions or education, but its integration into allied health higher education curricula and its inclusion by health professionals in everyday, lifelong practice still presents challenges. One challenge is affordable access to research study findings and data, and to resources that index such information. A librarian from a public, research-1 university will draw from experiences and practices at her institution, and from a review of such at similar institutions. She will present methods to promote: use of open access and open educational resources, greater participation in these movements, and curriculum-related applications.

Results: This flipped presentation will include an overview of top overall and health sciences-related open access and open educational resources: how to find them and suggestions for evaluation criteria. It will also include options to promote and use Creative Commons search and licensing for discovering and sharing materials licensed for others to use, reuse, and adapt. Methods for promoting open access and open educational resources in higher educational and other settings will follow, with a final overview of newly expanding options for do-it-yourself and open science initiatives including opportunities for involvement in health research and innovation.

Conclusions: Join us, and bring your laptop, tablet, or mobile device! This presentation will be a "flipped presentation," with a brief (ten-to-fifteen minutes) voice-over PowerPoint presentation sent out ahead of time. The in-person session will offer a hands-on approach with opportunities to delve into using one or more major sources of open access or open educational resources to discover resources to recommend for supporting curricula, professional development, or training. You will also have a chance to collaborate with colleagues and explore ideas for promotional events and materials to build awareness of open access and open education initiatives. Leave with first-hand knowledge of new resources and an action plan for an event to promote these important initiatives within your community.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-03-15

Fad Diets and Evidence-Based Research: 3 Mini-Case Studies in Student-Driven How-To Research Sessions

Description

As a Health Sciences Librarian at a large public research university, requests for one off library sessions, or online how-to support, to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) research skills are common.

As a Health Sciences Librarian at a large public research university, requests for one off library sessions, or online how-to support, to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) research skills are common. Having mastered brief 'hands-on' activities to practice skills learned, I was ready to branch out, and so were some faculty with whom I work, especially in the fields of Nutrition, Exercise, and Wellness. For Spring 2013 I worked with faculty to try pre-class time assignments followed by participatory, hands-on, student reporting (flipped) class sessions on:

1. Finding the source of research reported in health news articles.
2. Identifying high level EBP research studies on a nutrition topic.
3. Exploring career and research tools in Kinesiology.

This session will include a brief overview of each case study with discussion opportunities.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05-13

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Health Education Programming for Pregnant and Parenting Women in an Addiction Treatment Facility

Description

This paper details the development of a six-week health education class for pregnant and parenting women recovering from substance abuse. The class was developed in collaboration with Student Health Outreach

This paper details the development of a six-week health education class for pregnant and parenting women recovering from substance abuse. The class was developed in collaboration with Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) Community Initiative, a student-run organization providing free healthcare to underserved populations, and with Crossroads, Inc., a licensed treatment provider serving men, women, and veterans recovering from addiction and substance use disorders. A needs assessment via personal interview was conducted to identify the demographics of the female residents at the Crossroads for Women treatment facility, the existing medical health promotional services, and the needed medical and health promotional services. The needs assessment identified the need for health education for pregnant and parenting women recovering from addiction. The SHOW Program Development Guide was utilized to develop the content for the classes based on the Health Belief Model theory. The Health Belief Model focuses on the beliefs and attitudes of individuals and altering them to make achieving good health more feasible (Hochbaum, Rosenstock, and Kegels, 1952). The program curriculum identifies potential perceived barriers to health and utilizes strategies to decrease the perceived barriers and increase perceived benefits. The six-week course was divided to address six different topics: 1. Introduction, 2. Physical Health, 3. Stress Management, 4. Nutrition, 5. Exercise, and 6. Conclusion and Discharge Planning. The class will be taught by a variety of health professional disciplines in accordance with the interprofessional practice theory, which utilizes two or more health professions to improve health outcomes. This project outlines all presentation materials, handouts, activities, and implementation recommendations required to produce a program that helps pregnant and parenting women on their road to recovery.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

Lessons Learned from the Halle Heart Museum: A Content Analysis of Student Letters

Description

The purpose of this study was to gain greater insight on the educational growth and experience of children who visit the Halle Heart Children's Museum, by analyzing and exploring student

The purpose of this study was to gain greater insight on the educational growth and experience of children who visit the Halle Heart Children's Museum, by analyzing and exploring student thank you letters received from 2011-2016. Of the major contributors of cardiovascular disease taught in the museum, nutrition was discussed about most in the letters (42.6%). Children are able to learn about health related topics in museums, as evidenced by recall of topics and facts in student letters. Museums can be an influential and education experience for children, especially museums teaching about health related topics.

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Date Created
  • 2017-12

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Mapping the newly menstruating body: Qualitative analysis of teachers' experiences with menstruation education and ""hygiene"" curriculum in elementary schools

Description

Menstruation curricula in elementary schools presents an opportunity to better examine the early teachings about menstruation, as this is often the first time that young people learn about gender difference

Menstruation curricula in elementary schools presents an opportunity to better examine the early teachings about menstruation, as this is often the first time that young people learn about gender difference within school sanctioned curricula. A closer examination of this pedagogical moment from the perspective of educators helps us to understand the dissemination of the shame narrative present in menstrual socialization. Six teachers were interviewed about their experiences with administering the menstrual health curriculum in elementary schools across a large southwest metropolitan area. A discourse analysis of these interviews was completed in order to find themes of language used surrounding menstrual health curriculum. Themes of shame, legislative restrictions on sex education curriculum and personal narratives surrounding menstruation are discussed in addition to the current neo-liberal structure of public health curriculum. Future research into alternative modes of education on menstruation is proposed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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An Evaluation of HEAL International's Health Education Program in Tanzania, Africa

Description

This study investigated the potential efficacy of HEAL International's prevention education program in inducing health behavior change in HIV/AIDS, malaria, and communicable disease to children in grade levels ranging from

This study investigated the potential efficacy of HEAL International's prevention education program in inducing health behavior change in HIV/AIDS, malaria, and communicable disease to children in grade levels ranging from primary school to secondary school. The health education program was aimed at changing health behavior by increasing knowledge. This increase in knowledge was analyzed as a modifying factor in the Health Belief Model suggesting that knowledge, along with five other modifying factors, are directly responsible for an individual's health perceptions. These health perceptions ultimately result in an individual's health behavior. As a result, it is argued that an increase in knowledge can lead to health behavior change so long as it is coupled with a strong theoretical framework. Administering pre-evaluations at the beginning of the program, post evaluations at the end of the program, and a second post evaluation again two months later completed the evaluation. It was hypothesized that if there was a significant difference between the percent of correct answers at the pre-evaluation compared the second post-evaluation then there is evidence that HEAL's health education program is, or at least has the potential to, create sustainable health behavior change. A paired samples t-test was completed on the data and showed a statistically significant difference between the percent of correct answers at pre-evaluation and the percent of correct answers at second post-evaluation. These results indicated that the number of students with a comprehensive knowledge of the subjects that HEAL taught during the program had increased. It was concluded that the results of the study indicate evidence that HEAL's program has the potential to deliver sustainable health behavior change but that it will be more quantifiable once HEAL is able to adopt a theoretical framework on which to base future programs.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Health education programming for individuals experiencing homelessness utilizing the Health Belief Model.

Description

The Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) is a free, student-led interprofessional clinic and community outreach initiative that aims to serve individuals experiencing homelessness in Phoenix, AZ. Individuals experiencing homelessness

The Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) is a free, student-led interprofessional clinic and community outreach initiative that aims to serve individuals experiencing homelessness in Phoenix, AZ. Individuals experiencing homelessness face many situational and financial barriers to finding healthcare. In order to better understand these barriers, a community needs assessment (CNA) was conducted in Fall 2014 on the Human Services Campus (HSC), a hub of resources for the population. Results indicated chronic disease is moderately prevalent (37.21% and 27.91% reported obesity and hypertension, respectively, among others). Since chronic diseases can lead to more severe health issues, it is imperative to address, manage, and avoid these conditions. Health education programs are a key component of the SHOW clinic model and a means to address chronic disease. The Health Belief Model (HBM) is a theory-based behavior change model used in programs to increase patient adherence to and promotion of preventative health behaviors. SHOW health education programs will use the constructs of this model to inform program development. Since many student volunteers are not well-versed in health education literature, a SHOW Program Development Guide based on the HBM has been created. The guide will help ensure SHOW delivers high-quality and efficacious programs that have a long-lasting impact on patients now and as the organization continues to grow.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Adolescent motivation for healthy behaviors: a theory-based enhanced health curriculum for adolescents

Description

ABSTRACT

Adolescence is a period marked by significant physical, developmental, cognitive, and social changes, all of which contribute to health concerns for teens. A steady rise in life expectancy over

ABSTRACT

Adolescence is a period marked by significant physical, developmental, cognitive, and social changes, all of which contribute to health concerns for teens. A steady rise in life expectancy over the past two centuries is potentially diminishing due to the increase in prevalence, severity, and consequences of obesity in children and adolescents related to unhealthy lifestyle behaviors. Health behaviors are often established during childhood and adolescence that continue into adulthood. The development and integration of healthy lifestyle behaviors are vital through adolescence. Self-determination theory (SDT) offers a theoretical framework for attempting to understand individual differences in motivation and behavior. Recent studies have primarily focused on how adolescents make choices related to eating behaviors, physical activity, and self-care habits, and how the resultant behaviors are measured. Participants in this study were 63 healthy adolescents enrolled in 9th grade health class. All participants provided baseline data at Time 1 and again following the five-week pretest posttest intervention study at Time 2. This study examined the utility of SDT in the development of the Adolescent Intrinsic Motivation, a healthy lifestyle behavior intervention, using the tenets of SDT to explain healthy lifestyle motivational beliefs in adolescents, along with healthy lifestyle behaviors and knowledge. The AIM intervention study introduced basic health recommendations to adolescents in an autonomy-supportive environment, which has been shown to encourage the adolescent to make healthy behavior choices based on their own interest and enjoyment. Preliminary effects of the study indicated that participants receiving the AIM intervention demonstrated significant differences in motivational beliefs, healthy lifestyle knowledge, as well as healthy lifestyle behaviors from Time 1 (baseline) to Time 2 (post-intervention). Results of this study provide support for the use of SDT to address the competence, relatedness, and autonomy of adolescents in the development of health education material. Testing this intervention in a larger, random sampling of schools within the state, or even in more than one state, with a three- or six-month follow-up would be useful in determining the longer-term effects of the intervention.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Nutrition information in a high school cafeteria: the effect of point-of-purchase nutrition information during lunch in grades 9-12

Description

Providing nutrition information at point of sale at restaurants has gained in popularity in recent years and will soon become a legal requirement. Consumers are using this opportunity to become

Providing nutrition information at point of sale at restaurants has gained in popularity in recent years and will soon become a legal requirement. Consumers are using this opportunity to become more informed on the nutritional quality of the foods they consume in an effort to maintain healthfulness. Prior research has confirmed the utility of this information in adult populations. However, research on adolescents in school environments has resulted in mixed findings. This study investigated the effect of exposure to calorie and fat information on student purchases at lunchtime in a high school cafeteria. Additionally, it explored other factors that may contribute to students' food selections during school lunches. The research methods included analysis of changes in cafeteria food sales in one school, surveys, and focus groups. Analysis of cafeteria food sales during lunch did not show any significant change in the average number of calories and fat purchased per student between pre and post intervention. However, information gathered from focus group questioning demonstrated how students used the nutrition information to change their behavior after they have purchased their food.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Patient narratives of myalgic encephalomyelitis: situated knowledge for re/constructing healthcare

Description

Medical policies, practices, and definitions do not exist solely in the clinical realm; they show up in the lived experiences of patients. This research examines how people with the chronic

Medical policies, practices, and definitions do not exist solely in the clinical realm; they show up in the lived experiences of patients. This research examines how people with the chronic illness called myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) define their own illness experiences. They have situated knowledge about their illness onset, search for care, and clinical encounters. Their knowledge complicates and challenges the existing norms in clinical practice and medical discourse, as the experience of searching for care with ME reveals weaknesses in a system that is focused on acute care. Patient narratives reveal institutional patterns that obstruct access to medical care, such as disbelief from clinicians and lack of training in chronic illness protocols. They also reveal patterns in physician behavior that indicate the likelihood of receiving effective care. These patient narratives serve as a basis for continued examination of ME as well as further reconstruction of medical practice and procedure.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019