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The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Food Environment Maps, Vineland

The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Food Environment Maps, Vineland

Description

The maps in this chartbook describe the food environment in Vineland in terms of access to supermarkets, smaller grocery stores, convenience stores, and limited service restaurants. Research shows that when

The maps in this chartbook describe the food environment in Vineland in terms of access to supermarkets, smaller grocery stores, convenience stores, and limited service restaurants. Research shows that when residents have access to healthy food outlets, they tend to eat healthy.

• Food environment maps were created using geo-coded commercially available data of food outlets (Info USA, 2008 and Trade Dimensions, 2008) in Vineland and in a 1 mile buffer area around Vineland.

•Using the commercial data and additional investigation, food outlets were classified into different categories based on their likelihood of carrying healthy choices: supermarkets carry most healthy choices; smaller grocery stores carry fewer healthy choices; convenience stores and limited service restaurants are likely to carry mostly unhealthy choices.

• Access to different types of food outlets was computed at the census block group level based on concentration of stores / restaurants per unit area and is reported as food outlet densities.

• Food outlet density maps are compared with Census 2000 data to visualize accessibility of healthy foods in neighborhoods with different characteristics.

 

Data Sources: Info USA food outlet 2008 data

Trade Dimensions food outlet 2008 data

Census 2000 data

New Jersey Department of Education 2008-2009 data

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2010-08

The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Food Environment Maps, Trenton

The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Food Environment Maps, Trenton

Description

The maps in this chartbook describe the food environment in Trenton in terms of access to supermarkets, smaller grocery stores, convenience stores, and limited service restaurants. Research shows that when

The maps in this chartbook describe the food environment in Trenton in terms of access to supermarkets, smaller grocery stores, convenience stores, and limited service restaurants. Research shows that when residents have access to healthy food outlets, they tend to eat healthy.

•Food environment maps were created using geo-coded commercially available data of food outlets (InfoUSA, 2008 and Trade Dimensions, 2008) in Trenton and in a 1 mile buffer area around Trenton.

•Using the commercial data and additional investigation, food outlets were classified into different categories based on their likelihood of carrying healthy choices: supermarkets carry most healthy choices; smaller grocery stores carry fewer healthy choices; convenience stores and limited service restaurants are likely to carry mostly unhealthy choices.

• Access to different types of food outlets was computed at the census block group level based on concentration of stores / restaurants per unit area and is reported as food outlet densities.

•Food outlet density maps are compared with Census 2000 data to visualize accessibility of healthy foods in neighborhoods with different characteristics.

 

Data Sources: Info USA food outlet 2008 data

Trade Dimensions food outlet 2008 data

Census 2000 data

New Jersey Department of Education 2008-2009 data

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2010-08

The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Food Environment Maps, Newark

The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Food Environment Maps, Newark

Description

The maps in this chartbook describe the food environment in ewark in terms of access to supermarkets, smaller grocery stores, convenience stores, and limited service restaurants. Research shows that when

The maps in this chartbook describe the food environment in ewark in terms of access to supermarkets, smaller grocery stores, convenience stores, and limited service restaurants. Research shows that when residents have access to healthy food outlets, they tend to eat healthy.

• Food environment maps were created using geo-coded commercially available data of food outlets (InfoUSA, 2008 and Trade Dimensions, 2008) in Newark and in a 1 mile buffer area around Newark.

•Using the commercial data and additional investigation, food outlets were classified into different categories based on their likelihood of carrying healthy choices: supermarkets carry most healthy choices; smaller grocery stores carry fewer healthy choices; convenience stores and limited service restaurants are likely to carry mostly unhealthy choices.

• Access to different types of food outlets was computed at the census block group level based on concentration of stores / restaurants per unit area and is reported as food outlet densities.

• Food outlet density maps are compared with Census 2000 data to visualize accessibility of healthy foods in neighborhoods with different characteristics.

Data Sources: Info USA food outlet 2008 data

Trade Dimensions food outlet 2008 data

Census 2000 data

New Jersey Department of Education 2008-2009 data

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2010-08

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The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Physical Activity Environment Maps, Newark

Description

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Newark in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Newark in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The maps in this chartbook were created using physical activity facilities data from a commercial database (lnfoUSA, 2008), data from city departments, as well as information obtained from systematic web searches. The maps present data for the city of Newark and for a 1 mile buffer area around Newark.

• Physical activity centers include private and public facilities which offer physical activity opportunities for children 3-18 years of age.

• Physical activity environment maps are compared with Census 2000 data to visualize accessibility of physical activity opportunities in neighborhoods with different characteristics.

• Poverty level presented in this chartbook are based on the 2000 Federal Poverty Guidelines.

• Crime rates in Newark are presented at the census block group level as relative crime risk (CrimeRisk) obtained from a commercial data source (Applied Geographic Solutions, 2008). CrimeRisk - an index value derived from modeling the relationship between crime rates and demographics data - is expressed as the risk of crime occurring in a specific block group relative to the national average. For this chartbook, data on total CrimeRisk, which includes personal and property crimes, are reported.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2010

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The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Physical Activity Environment Maps, Vineland

Description

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Vineland in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Vineland in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The maps in this chartbook were created using physical activity facilities data from a commercial database (lnfoUSA, 2008), data from city departments, as well as information obtained from systematic web searches. The maps present data for the city of Vineland and for a 1 mile buffer area around Vineland.

• Physical activity centers include private and public facilities which offer physical activity opportunities for children 3-18 years of age.

• Physical activity environment maps are compared with Census 2000 data to visualize accessibility of physical activity opportunities in neighborhoods with different characteristics.

• Poverty level presented in this chartbook are based on the 2000 Federal Poverty Guidelines.

• Crime rates in Vineland are presented at the census block group level as relative crime risk (CrimeRisk) obtained from a commercial data source (Applied Geographic Solutions, 2008). CrimeRisk - an index value derived from modeling the relationship between crime rates and demographics data - is expressed as the risk of crime occurring in a specific block group relative to the national average. For this chartbook, data on total CrimeRisk, which includes personal and property crimes, are reported.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2010