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Advancing the Implementation of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Residential Treatment

Description

Abstract
Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and

Abstract
Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond to opioid overdose situations.

Design/Methods: Pre-intervention Opioid Overdose Knowledge Scale (OOKS) and Opioid
Overdose Attitude Scale (OOAS) surveys were administered electronically to five BHTs in
2020. Data obtained were de-identified. Comparisons between responses to pre-and post-surveys questions were carried out using the standardized Wilcoxon signed-rank statistical test(z). This study was conducted in a residential treatment center (RTC) with the institutional review board's approval from Arizona State University. BHTs aged 18 years and above, working at this RTC were included in the study.

Interventions: An online training was provided on opioid overdose response (OOR) and
naloxone administration and on when to refer patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) for
medication-assisted treatment.

Results: Compared to the pre-intervention surveys, the BHTs showed significant improvements
in attitudes on the overall score on the OOAS (mean= 26.4 ± 13.1; 95% CI = 10.1 - 42.7; z =
2.02; p = 0.043) and significant improvement in knowledge on the OOKS (mean= 10.6 ± 6.5;
95% CI = 2.5 – 18.7; z =2.02, p = 0.043).

Conclusions and Relevance: Training BHTs working in an RTC on opioid overdose response is
effective in increasing attitudes and knowledge related to opioid overdose management. opioid
overdose reversal in RTCs.

Keywords: Naloxone, opioid overdose, overdose education, overdose response program

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-12

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Advancing the Implementation of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Residential Treatment

Description

Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond

Objective: To assess the attitudes and knowledge of behavioral health technicians (BHTs)
towards opioid overdose management and to assess the effect of online training on opioid
overdose response on BHTs’ attitudes and knowledge, and the confidence to identify and
respond to opioid overdose situations.
Design/Methods: Pre-intervention Opioid Overdose Knowledge Scale (OOKS) and Opioid
Overdose Attitude Scale (OOAS) surveys were administered electronically to five BHTs in
2020. Data obtained were de-identified. Comparisons between responses to pre-and post-surveys
questions were carried out using the standardized Wilcoxon signed-rank statistical test(z). This
study was conducted in a residential treatment center (RTC) with the institutional review board's
approval from Arizona State University. BHTs aged 18 years and above, working at this RTC
were included in the study.
Interventions: An online training was provided on opioid overdose response (OOR) and
naloxone administration and on when to refer patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) for
medication-assisted treatment.
Results: Compared to the pre-intervention surveys, the BHTs showed significant improvements
in attitudes on the overall score on the OOAS (mean= 26.4 ± 13.1; 95% CI = 10.1 - 42.7; z =
2.02; p = 0.043) and significant improvement in knowledge on the OOKS (mean= 10.6 ± 6.5;
95% CI = 2.5 – 18.7; z =2.02, p = 0.043).
Conclusions and Relevance: Training BHTs working in an RTC on opioid overdose response is
effective in increasing attitudes and knowledge related to opioid overdose management. opioid
overdose reversal in RTCs.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-12

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Opioid Overdose: How to Spot the Signs and Act

Description

Background and Aims: Due to the significant rise in opioid use and fatal opioid overdoses, an opioid reversal agent naloxone has been made available to the public through standing orders at Arizona pharmacies. The aim of this project is to

Background and Aims: Due to the significant rise in opioid use and fatal opioid overdoses, an opioid reversal agent naloxone has been made available to the public through standing orders at Arizona pharmacies. The aim of this project is to implement a virtual naloxone education program to increase community knowledge of opioid addiction, opioid overdose, and opioid overdose response. Design: Utilized a one group, pretest-posttest design utilizing Brief Opioid Overdose Knowledge (BOOK) screening tool. Participants recruited through Mesa Community College website as an online event open to students, staff, and public. Setting: Online WebEx event through Mesa Community College. Intervention: Presented a 45-minute educational PowerPoint on opioids, opioid overdose, and opioid overdose response with a 15-minute question answer session. Participants: A total of 67 people attended the online event, 38 participated in pre-test and 19 participated in post-test survey. Demographics included 73.7% female, 55.3% between ages 18-30, 86.7% identify as white/Caucasian, and 92% signed up with a community college email address. Findings: Statistically significant results, with alpha value of 0.05, t(13) = -3.99, p = .002, d=1.07. Conclusions: Implementing an online education session is associated with increased knowledge on opioid use, opioid overdose, and opioid overdose response. Implementing community-based education programs may increase knowledge on opioid overdose prevention and community intervention.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-04-27

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The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Survey: Chartbook, Vineland, Summer 2010

Description

The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study was designed to provide vital information for planning, implementing, and evaluating interventions aimed at preventing childhood obesity in five New Jersey municipalities: Camden, Newark, New Brunswick, Trenton, and Vineland. These five communities are being

The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study was designed to provide vital information for planning, implementing, and evaluating interventions aimed at preventing childhood obesity in five New Jersey municipalities: Camden, Newark, New Brunswick, Trenton, and Vineland. These five communities are being supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s New Jersey Partnership for Healthy Kids program to plan and implement policy and environmental change strategies to prevent childhood obesity. Effective interventions for addressing childhood obesity require community-specific information on

who is most at risk and on contributing factors that can be addressed through tailored interventions that meet the needs of the community. Based on comprehensive research, a series of reports are being prepared for each community to assist in planning effective interventions.

The main components of the study were:

• A household telephone survey of 1700 families with 3–18 year old children,

• De-identified heights and weights measured at public schools,

• Assessment of the food and physical activity environments using objective data.

This report presents the results from the household survey. Reports based on school body mass index (BMI) data and food and physical activity environment data are available at www.cshp.rutgers.edu/childhoodobesity.htm.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2010

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The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Physical Activity Environment Maps, Vineland

Description

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Vineland in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The maps

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Vineland in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The maps in this chartbook were created using physical activity facilities data from a commercial database (lnfoUSA, 2008), data from city departments, as well as information obtained from systematic web searches. The maps present data for the city of Vineland and for a 1 mile buffer area around Vineland.

• Physical activity centers include private and public facilities which offer physical activity opportunities for children 3-18 years of age.

• Physical activity environment maps are compared with Census 2000 data to visualize accessibility of physical activity opportunities in neighborhoods with different characteristics.

• Poverty level presented in this chartbook are based on the 2000 Federal Poverty Guidelines.

• Crime rates in Vineland are presented at the census block group level as relative crime risk (CrimeRisk) obtained from a commercial data source (Applied Geographic Solutions, 2008). CrimeRisk - an index value derived from modeling the relationship between crime rates and demographics data - is expressed as the risk of crime occurring in a specific block group relative to the national average. For this chartbook, data on total CrimeRisk, which includes personal and property crimes, are reported.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2010

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The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Physical Activity Environment Maps, New Brunswick

Description

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in New Brunswick in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in New Brunswick in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The maps in this chartbook were created using physical activity facilities data from a commercial database (lnfoUSA, 2008), data from city departments, as well as information obtained from systematic web searches. The maps present data for the city of New Brunswick and for a 1 mile buffer area around New Brunswick.

• Physical activity centers include private and public facilities which offer physical activity opportunities for children 3-18 years of age.

• Physical activity environment maps are compared with Census 2000 data to visualize accessibility of physical activity opportunities in neighborhoods with different characteristics.

• Poverty level presented in this chartbook are based on the 2000 Federal Poverty Guidelines.

• Crime rates in New Brunswick are presented at the census block group level as relative crime risk (CrimeRisk) obtained from a commercial data source (Applied Geographic Solutions, 2008). CrimeRisk - an index value derived from modeling the relationship between crime rates and demographics data - is expressed as the risk of crime occurring in a specific block group relative to the national average. For this chartbook, data on total CrimeRisk, which includes personal and property crimes, are reported.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2010

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The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Physical Activity Environment Maps, Newark

Description

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Newark in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The maps

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Newark in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The maps in this chartbook were created using physical activity facilities data from a commercial database (lnfoUSA, 2008), data from city departments, as well as information obtained from systematic web searches. The maps present data for the city of Newark and for a 1 mile buffer area around Newark.

• Physical activity centers include private and public facilities which offer physical activity opportunities for children 3-18 years of age.

• Physical activity environment maps are compared with Census 2000 data to visualize accessibility of physical activity opportunities in neighborhoods with different characteristics.

• Poverty level presented in this chartbook are based on the 2000 Federal Poverty Guidelines.

• Crime rates in Newark are presented at the census block group level as relative crime risk (CrimeRisk) obtained from a commercial data source (Applied Geographic Solutions, 2008). CrimeRisk - an index value derived from modeling the relationship between crime rates and demographics data - is expressed as the risk of crime occurring in a specific block group relative to the national average. For this chartbook, data on total CrimeRisk, which includes personal and property crimes, are reported.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2010

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The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Physical Activity Environment Maps, Trenton

Description

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Trenton in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Trenton in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The maps in this chartbook were created using physical activity facilities data from a commercial database (lnfoUSA, 2008), data from city departments, as well as information obtained from systematic web searches. The maps present data for the city of Trenton and for a 1 mile buffer area around Trenton.

• Physical activity centers include private and public facilities which offer physical activity opportunities for children 3-18 years of age.

• Physical activity environment maps are compared with Census 2000 data to visualize accessibility of physical activity opportunities in neighborhoods with different characteristics.

• Poverty level presented in this chartbook are based on the 2000 Federal Poverty Guidelines.

• Crime rates in Trenton are presented at the census block group level as relative crime risk (CrimeRisk) obtained from a commercial data source (Applied Geographic Solutions, 2008). CrimeRisk - an index value derived from modeling the relationship between crime rates and demographics data - is expressed as the risk of crime occurring in a specific block group relative to the national average. For this chartbook, data on total CrimeRisk, which includes personal and property crimes, are reported.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2010

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The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Survey: Chartbook, Trenton, Summer 2010

Description

The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study was designed to provide vital information for planning, implementing, and evaluating interventions aimed at preventing childhood obesity in five New Jersey municipalities: Camden, Newark, New Brunswick, Trenton, and Vineland. These five communities are being

The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study was designed to provide vital information for planning, implementing, and evaluating interventions aimed at preventing childhood obesity in five New Jersey municipalities: Camden, Newark, New Brunswick, Trenton, and Vineland. These five communities are being supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s New Jersey Partnership for Healthy Kids program to plan and implement policy and environmental change strategies to prevent childhood obesity. Effective interventions for addressing childhood obesity require community-specific information on

who is most at risk and on contributing factors that can be addressed through tailored interventions that meet the needs of the community. Based on comprehensive research, a series of reports are being prepared for each community to assist in planning effective interventions.

The main components of the study were:

• A household telephone survey of 1700 families with 3–18 year old children,

• De-identified heights and weights measured at public schools,

• Assessment of the food and physical activity environments using objective data.

This report presents the results from the household survey. Reports based on school body mass index (BMI) data and food and physical activity environment data are available at www.cshp.rutgers.edu/childhoodobesity.htm.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2010

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The New Jersey Childhood Obesity Study: Physical Activity Environment Maps, Camden

Description

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Camden in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The maps in this chartbook

The maps in this chartbook describe the physical activity environment in Camden in terms of geographic distribution of parks and physical activity facilities. Research shows that people who have access to these facilities are more likely to be physically active.

• The maps in this chartbook were created using physical activity facilities data from a commercial database (lnfoUSA, 2008), data from city departments, as well as information obtained from systematic web searches. The maps present data for the city of Camden and for a 1 mile buffer area around Camden.

• Physical activity centers include private and public facilities which offer physical activity opportunities for children 3-18 years of age.

• Physical activity environment maps are compared with Census 2000 data to visualize accessibility of physical activity opportunities in neighborhoods with different characteristics.

• Poverty level presented in this chartbook are based on the 2000 Federal Poverty Guidelines.

• Crime rates in Camden are presented at the census block group level as relative crime risk (CrimeRisk) obtained from a commercial data source (Applied Geographic Solutions, 2008). CrimeRisk - an index value derived from modeling the relationship between crime rates and demographics data - is expressed as the risk of crime occurring in a specific block group relative to the national average. For this chartbook, data on total CrimeRisk, which includes personal and property crimes, are reported.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
2010