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Eat In, Not Out: A Comparative Analysis Between at Home Cooking and Restaurant Dining

Description

This creative project seeks to demonstrate the nutritional and financial benefits of cooking in versus eating out to college age students. We sought to determine what factors significantly differentiated restaurant meals versus home-cooked versions, and how we could share this

This creative project seeks to demonstrate the nutritional and financial benefits of cooking in versus eating out to college age students. We sought to determine what factors significantly differentiated restaurant meals versus home-cooked versions, and how we could share this information with our peers to potentially influence them to make a healthy lifestyle change. The first step was to determine the factors that influence college-aged students eating habits, and was presented with a review of relevant literature in several topics. We researched food literacy in young adults, the impact of fast food, social media's role in healthy eating habits, health behavior change in young adults, and the benefits of home cooking to obtain a general baseline of the knowledge of college-aged students. The initial research was utilized to write more effective blog posts that appropriately addressed our targeted demographic and to determine what platforms would be most appropriate to convey our information. These ideas were taken and then translated into a blog and Instagram account that contained healthy, copycat recipes of popular restaurant meals. We wrote 30 blog posts which were made up of 20 original recipes, 8 nutrition informational posts, and an introduction/conclusion. Finally, a focus group was hosted to ascertain the opinions of our peers, and to determine if they would be willing to make a lifestyle change in the form of cooking more frequently as opposed to eating out regularly. We provided them with a pre and post survey to gather their opinions before and after reviewing the findings of our research and project. We concluded that if given the information in an accessible way, college students are willing to eat in, not out.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Incorporating Nutritional Support as Complementary Therapy for Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Treatment

Description

Nutritional support offered before and during chemotherapy treatment is proven to improve the outcomes of treatment (Bernhardson, 2016). This project seeks to examine current forms of nutritional support offered to patients, as well as the models of care and support

Nutritional support offered before and during chemotherapy treatment is proven to improve the outcomes of treatment (Bernhardson, 2016). This project seeks to examine current forms of nutritional support offered to patients, as well as the models of care and support teams in cancer treatment centers. The basis for this project incorporated personal experiences at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Gilbert, Arizona as well as research into the work of clinical oncology dietitians. An intense interest in food videos and blogs also informed this project, and was incorporated in the hope of providing chemotherapy patients a platform to discover recipes specific to their unique situation. The combination of this research was utilized to create several videos which demonstrated specific recipes beneficial for patients as well as creating a platform for this particular population. While nutritional support can take multiple forms, the focus of nutritional support surrounds symptom management. The common side effects of chemotherapy such as nausea, mucositis (mouth sores), and extreme weight loss were taken into account. Recipes were formulated to directly address these conditions and each recipe was broken down into the benefits of both macronutrients and micronutrients. In addition to formulating specific recipes and videos, barriers to proper nutritional support were examined and explained. These barriers include understaffing of clinical dietitians at cancer treatment centers, a patient's lack of transportation to and from treatments, as well as an overwhelming viewpoint that nutritional support is only required for extreme cases of malnutrition. Combatting these barriers and offering more forms of nutritional support will help to increase a patient's positive response to treatment, manage their symptoms, and improve their overall quality of life.

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Date Created
2018-12

Nutrition Education Video Series for the Improvement of Arizona State University Student Health

Description

Most reliable nutrition information can be found online, but it can be nearly impossible to differentiate from the unreliable blogs and websites that claim their information is correct. Because of this, it can be difficult for students to determine which

Most reliable nutrition information can be found online, but it can be nearly impossible to differentiate from the unreliable blogs and websites that claim their information is correct. Because of this, it can be difficult for students to determine which information is true and which advice they will follow. During this time of growth and learning, it is essential that students have access to accurate information that will help them to be healthier individuals for years to come. The goal of this project was to provide students with an easily accessible and reliable resource for nutrition information that was presented in a simple and relatable way. The following videos and attached materials were created in response to ASU student needs and will be available for students on the ASU wellness website. Eating Healthy on a Budget: https://youtu.be/H-IUArD0phY Healthy Choices at Fast Food Restaurants: https://youtu.be/ZxcjBblpRtM Quick Healthy Meals: https://youtu.be/7uIDFe15-dM

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Created

Date Created
2017-12

Signature Dish: The Art of Cooking and the Science of Eating Well in the Age of Social Media

Description

For this creative project, the student's overarching objective was to establish a signature dish and to learn how to cook. She acquired a cookbook fit for novice cooks, "Eat What You Love" by Marlene Koch, which focused on healthy eating

For this creative project, the student's overarching objective was to establish a signature dish and to learn how to cook. She acquired a cookbook fit for novice cooks, "Eat What You Love" by Marlene Koch, which focused on healthy eating through the reduction of sugar and fat. The student completed thirty recipes including two appetizers, five breakfast entrees, five lunch entrees, twelve dinner entrees, and six desserts. Her culinary ventures were then detailed through a blog site the student had created. Blog posts included a brief description primarily of the portion size, a nutritional analysis of the recipe, enjoyable aspects of the dish, whether something went wrong, what was learned from creating the dish, as well as a photograph of the prepared dish. A large element of this project focused upon food photography and obtaining images that made the created dish look appealing. It was found that the best images were taken in natural lighting with good compositions and pops of color. In order to gain readership, the student developed an Instagram account where she would post images of the food and provide links to her blog entries and recipes. Through this means, she was able to obtain over 100 followers to her blog. In addition to learning how to cook, the student sought out to understand components of a healthy diet and how each nutrient contributes to an individual health. This objective is detailed throughout the course of the paper as well as several other objectives. The student also studied how social media has impacted the way in which we share food and our knowledge of food. Additionally in this paper, the student evaluated the evolution of the USDA Dietary Guidelines and their effectiveness over time. From this project, the student walked away with new knowledge about nutritional eating and lifestyle habits that she will retain for years to come. She hopes that this project will encourage other students to take on their own culinary adventure.

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Created

Date Created
2017-05

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Female Collegiate Gymnast's Nutritional Knowledge and Health

Description

Forty collegiate gymnasts were recruited for a nutrition and health study. Participants must have been at least eighteen years old at Arizona State University (ASU) in the club or team gymnastics program. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) reviewed and accepted

Forty collegiate gymnasts were recruited for a nutrition and health study. Participants must have been at least eighteen years old at Arizona State University (ASU) in the club or team gymnastics program. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) reviewed and accepted my survey in order to hand out to the gymnasts. The ASU club and team coach and the ASU study team also approved my survey. As soon as the survey was approved, it was emailed to all of the gymnasts. ASU gymnasts were surveyed on nutritional knowledge and personal health. Subjects answered a quiz on nutrient needs and serving sizes. Personal questions consisted of height, weight, injuries, body image, and typical meal plans. Gymnasts were given a $10 compensation to increase the participation. We found that only 16% of gymnasts surveyed scored a 70% or higher on their nutritional knowledge. Although these gymnasts do not have adequate knowledge, the majority consume a healthy diet. Diets included fruits, vegetables, protein-rich foods, and few high fat and sugary foods. Four of the gymnasts had one or fewer injuries in the past two years, although, four gymnasts also had three or more injuries. No correlation was found between diet and injuries. There was also no correlation between the gymnast's nutritional knowledge and their health.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-12

Let Food be Thy Medicine

Description

“Let Food be Thy Medicine” focuses on alternative treatment for patients suffering from obesity, diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension, and coronary artery disease. Nutrition is an important aspect of overall health and can contribute to prevention and management of these

“Let Food be Thy Medicine” focuses on alternative treatment for patients suffering from obesity, diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension, and coronary artery disease. Nutrition is an important aspect of overall health and can contribute to prevention and management of these conditions, especially when combined with medication and physical activity. Obesity is a condition that people worldwide struggle with. Adequate nutrition can play a major role in contributing to the prevention of and management of obesity not only through calorie and macronutrient intake but also by affecting hormonal and energy balances in the body. Recommended physical activity levels are included along with dietary
utritional intake recommendations on the educational pamphlet to give patients a starting guideline and better understanding how to help this condition. Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and coronary artery disease are also common conditions treated by healthcare professionals. There are currently several medications on the market to help manage these conditions that range in price and have many side effects. Nutrition and exercise are two factors that can further contribute to the management of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and coronary artery disease, but they can also help prevent and delay their onset. Nutrition and physical activity education along with examples of certain foods that can aid in reaching nutritional goals are outlined in the educational pamphlet to give patients a visual of what is in the academic paper.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Nutrition Protocols for Injured Athletes

Description

This thesis project will discuss how the three macronutrients, protein, carbohydrate and fat, benefit the body and what happens when the body is lacking in any of them. It also delves into micronutrients and supplements and how those can aid

This thesis project will discuss how the three macronutrients, protein, carbohydrate and fat, benefit the body and what happens when the body is lacking in any of them. It also delves into micronutrients and supplements and how those can aid in the recovery process following an injury. Inflammation and sleep as well as mood disturbances are also explained. Meal options are available in the second half of this paper displaying pictures of nutritional meals along with their ingredients, instructions and calories. This project displays how a lack of protein can decrease muscle protein synthesis, how carbohydrate deficiency can lead to fatigue and more injury and how Omega-3 fatty acids are more beneficial than Omega-6 fatty acids. In addition, the paper discusses how vitamins, such as vitamin D and C, are important in providing bone strength and preventing excess inflammation. Supplements are reported to be beneficial, however, a disadvantage of consuming nutrients from a synthetic source can rob the athlete of a healthy mixture of nutrients and minerals. Overall, consumption of proper nutrients can aid in the recovery process following an injury and sleep is an important factor that should also be considered while the body heals.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

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iPhone applications and improvement in weight and health parameters: a randomized controlled trial

Description

Dietary counseling from a registered dietitian has been shown in previous studies to aid in weight loss for those receiving counseling. With the increasing use of smartphone diet/weight loss applications (app), this study sought to investigate if an iPhone diet

Dietary counseling from a registered dietitian has been shown in previous studies to aid in weight loss for those receiving counseling. With the increasing use of smartphone diet/weight loss applications (app), this study sought to investigate if an iPhone diet app providing feedback from a registered dietitian improved weight loss and bio-markers of health. Twenty-four healthy adults who owned iPhones (BMI > 24 kg/m2) completed this trial. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three app groups: the MyDietitian app with daily feedback from a registered dietitian (n=7), the MyDietitian app without feedback (n=7), and the MyPlate feedback control app (n=10). Participants used their respective diet apps daily for 8-weeks while their weight loss, adherence to self-monitoring, blood bio-markers of health, and physical activity were monitored. All of the groups had a significant reduction in waist and hip circumference (p<0.001), a reduction in A1c (p=0.002), an increase in HDL cholesterol levels (p=0.012), and a reduction in calories consumed (p=0.022) over the duration of the trial. Adherence to diet monitoring via the apps did not differ between groups during the study. Body weight did not change during the study for any groups. However, when the participants were divided into low (<50% of days) or high adherence (>50% of days) groups, irrespective of study group, the high adherence group had a significant reduction in weight when compared to the low adherence group (p=0.046). These data suggest that diet apps may be useful tools for self-monitoring and even weight loss, but that the value appears to be the self-monitoring process and not the app specifically.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2014

Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis through Lifestyle Changes: Nutrition, Exercise, Sleep, and Stress Management

Description

Multiple sclerosis is currently deemed the most common autoimmune disease. By definition, multiple sclerosis, known more commonly as MS, involves an immune-mediated process in which an abnormal response of the body’s immune system is directed against the central nervous system

Multiple sclerosis is currently deemed the most common autoimmune disease. By definition, multiple sclerosis, known more commonly as MS, involves an immune-mediated process in which an abnormal response of the body’s immune system is directed against the central nervous system (“Definition of MS,” n.d.). Common treatment protocols call for daily, monthly, or yearly disease-modifying medications. These drugs are taken indefinitely to stop the spread and appearance of new lesions, improve symptoms, and offer relief to the afflicted individuals. The necessity for patients to take these basic medical treatments is paramount, however, it should not be overlooked to make lifestyle changes as well. The purpose of this paper is to give a detailed understanding of multiple sclerosis, its etiology evolution, and medical advancements, while emphasizing the necessary transitions which must be made from a nutritional and lifestyle management standpoint. A brief focus will be placed on sleep, exercise, and stress management, with an emphasis on nutrition.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Use of a non-invasive acoustical monitoring system to predict ad libitum eating events

Description

Obesity is currently a prevalent health concern in the United States. Essential to combating it are accurate methods of assessing individual dietary intake under ad libitum conditions. The acoustical monitoring system (AMS), consisting of a throat microphone and jaw strain

Obesity is currently a prevalent health concern in the United States. Essential to combating it are accurate methods of assessing individual dietary intake under ad libitum conditions. The acoustical monitoring system (AMS), consisting of a throat microphone and jaw strain sensor, has been proposed as a non-invasive method for tracking free-living eating events. This study assessed the accuracy of eating events tracked by the AMS, compared to the validated vending machine system used by the NIDDK in Phoenix. Application of AMS data toward estimation of mass and calories consumed was also considered. In this study, 10 participants wore the AMS in a clinical setting for 24 hours while all food intake was recorded by the vending machine. Results indicated a correlation of 0.76 between number of eating events by the AMS and the vending machine (p = 0.019). A dependent T-test yielded a p-value of 0.799, illustrating a lack of significant difference between these methods of tracking intake. Finally, number of seconds identified as eating by the AMS had a 0.91 correlation with mass of intake (p = 0.001) and a 0.70 correlation with calories of intake (p = 0.034). These results indicate that the AMS is a valid method of objectively recording eating events under ad libitum conditions. Additional research is required to validate this device under free-living conditions.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013