Matching Items (5)

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Effect of a Local Labor Demand Shock on Postsecondary Education Enrollment

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A growing number of jobs in the US require a college degree or technical education, and the wage difference between jobs requiring a high school diploma and a college education has increased to over $17,000 per year. Enrollment levels in

A growing number of jobs in the US require a college degree or technical education, and the wage difference between jobs requiring a high school diploma and a college education has increased to over $17,000 per year. Enrollment levels in postsecondary education have been rising for at least the past decade, and this paper attempts to tease out how much of the increasing enrollment is due to changes in the demand by companies for workers. A Bartik Instrument, which is a measure of local area labor demand, for each county in the US was constructed from 2007 to 2014, and using multivariate linear regression the effect of changing labor demand on local postsecondary education enrollment rates was examined. A small positive effect was found, but the effect size in relation to the total change in enrollment levels was diminutive. From the start to the end of the recession (2007 to 2010), Bartik Instrument calculated unemployment increased from 5.3% nationally to 8.2%. This level of labor demand contraction would lead to a 0.42% increase in enrollment between 2008 and 2011. The true enrollment increase over this period was 7.6%, so the model calculated 5.5% of the enrollment increase was based on the changes in labor demand.

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Date Created
2016-05

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The Effects of Unemployment on Children

Description

This research looked at the effects unemployment had on children. A searched of the previous research few studies on the effects unemployment had on children. The leading research article, or genesis of the later studies found on the topic, was

This research looked at the effects unemployment had on children. A searched of the previous research few studies on the effects unemployment had on children. The leading research article, or genesis of the later studies found on the topic, was the 1938 study done by Einsenburg and Lazafeld. In that study, they found that children experience many negative effects from having an unemployed parent. In the current study, a total of 111 participants, (79 females and 32 males), in the study most of the volunteers came from Arizona State University, and the surrounding area. The research hypothesis (H1) was that individuals who had an unemployed parent as a child (Children/child for this study was defined being between the ages of 10-15) were more likely to be depressed, isolated, bullied, have an increase of illness, be less optimistic about the future and experience a decline in school performance than individuals whose parents were never unemployed. The current study found that having an unemployed parent led to being more depressed, isolated, optimistic, and having lower school performance and self-esteem in adolescence. Interestingly the study also found that as an adult the child of unemployed parents was more likely to be bullied as an adult. The results of this study furthered the research on the effects of unemployment had on children, and recommendations were made for future studies on the effects of parents unemployment has on children.

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2013-05

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A Short-Term Solution to the Truck Driver Shortage and Veteran Unemployment

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This thesis looks at a short-term solution to the truck driver shortage: transitioning U.S. military veterans into truck driver roles. Due to the adoption of self-driving trucks, the shortage is projected to end in 2022; however, freight companies may not

This thesis looks at a short-term solution to the truck driver shortage: transitioning U.S. military veterans into truck driver roles. Due to the adoption of self-driving trucks, the shortage is projected to end in 2022; however, freight companies may not be able to keep up with growing freight volumes until then. In the meantime, providing commercial driver's license (CDL) training on military bases has the potential to alleviate the shortage and veteran unemployment. A number of journal articles were read and interviews were conducted to determine the practicality of this solution. This thesis includes those findings and a number of considerations that should be made before implementing it.

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Date Created
2016-12

Changes in Employment Status and Food Security During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Description

In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic triggered a sudden and severe economic downturn. Between February and May 2020, the number of unemployed individuals rose by more than 14 million, resulting in an unprecedented increase in the unemployment rate, which went

In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic triggered a sudden and severe economic downturn. Between February and May 2020, the number of unemployed individuals rose by more than 14 million, resulting in an unprecedented increase in the unemployment rate, which went from 3.8% in February to 14.4% in April. Even though unemployment has declined in recent months, with some individuals returning to work, the rate is still much higher than it was one year ago (7.9% in September 2020 vs. 3.5% in September 2019). Further, as of September 2020, there are 19.4 million persons unable to work due to the pandemic, as well as 6.3 million persons working only part time even though they would prefer to work more.

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Date Created
2020-11

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The unemployment-crime relationship revisited: do neighborhoods matter?

Description

Although much has been done to examine the relationship between unemployment and crime, little consideration has been given to the impact neighborhood-level factors such as informal social control may have on the strength of unemployment as a predictor of crime.

Although much has been done to examine the relationship between unemployment and crime, little consideration has been given to the impact neighborhood-level factors such as informal social control may have on the strength of unemployment as a predictor of crime. The present study seeks to fill this gap by assessing whether the declining crime rates over a period of surging unemployment under the financial crisis are due to unchanged levels of informal social control. To examine these relationships, the present study utilizes data from Uniform Crime Reports (UCR), calls for service to the police, and the United States Census and American Community Survey. These data are longitudinal in nature covering the period 2007-2011 and are all related to Glendale, Arizona. The results indicate that the financial crisis predicts lower rates of property crimes as well as lower rates of calls for service relative to UCR crimes. Additionally, the present study finds that unemployment is a significant predictor of increases in UCR property crime, UCR violent crime, and engagement in each of my measures of informal social control.

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2016