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Practical Preservation for Everyone: Why Digital Preservation Matters to You and Your Community

Description

Digital technology has enabled us to record and share our memories and histories faster and in greater numbers than previously imagined. However digital files rely on hardware, software, and descriptive information to be used. As formats change and equipment to

Digital technology has enabled us to record and share our memories and histories faster and in greater numbers than previously imagined. However digital files rely on hardware, software, and descriptive information to be used. As formats change and equipment to read them goes out of use we are all challenged to connect our present to our future. How long do you want your digital files to last? Decades or even a few years from now will you still be able to access and enjoy those pictures, documents and other digital items you create today?

Libraries, museums and archives spend countless hours and resources preserving physical items from the past and present, but may be forfeiting the longevity of our digital work and connecting to future generations through unintended neglect. Using practical examples and employing best practices of research institutions, participants will learn important first steps to digital preservation including the importance of metadata to personal history, recommended file formats, and approaches they can immediately use to ensure the work they create today will still be enjoyed tomorrow. Help yourself, your organization, and your patrons continue to connect their digital heritage to the generations yet to come.

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2015-11-20

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Trust as a Multilevel Phenomenon: Implications for Improved Integrative Science in Trust Research

Description

Examinations of trust have advanced steadily over the past several decades, yielding important insights within criminal justice, economics, environmental studies, management and industrial organization, psychology, political science, and sociology. Cross-disciplinary approaches to the study of trust, however, have been limited

Examinations of trust have advanced steadily over the past several decades, yielding important insights within criminal justice, economics, environmental studies, management and industrial organization, psychology, political science, and sociology. Cross-disciplinary approaches to the study of trust, however, have been limited by differences in defining and measuring trust and in methodological approaches. In this chapter, we take the position that: 1) cross-disciplinary studies can be improved by recognizing trust as a multilevel phenomenon, and 2) context impacts the nature of trusting relations. We present an organizing framework for conceptualizing trust between trustees and trustors at person, group, and institution levels. The differences between these levels have theoretical implications for the study of trust and that might be used to justify distinctions in definitions and methodological approaches across settings. We highlight where the levels overlap and describe how this overlap has created confusion in the trust literature to date. Part of the overlap – and confusion – is the role of interpersonal trust at each level. We delineate when and how interpersonal trust is theoretically relevant to conceptualizing and measuring trust at each level and suggest that other trust-related constructs, such as perceived legitimacy, competence, and integrity, may be more important than interpersonal trust at some levels and in some contexts. Translating findings from trust research in one discipline to another and collaborating across disciplines may be facilitated if researchers ensure that their levels of conceptualization and measurement are aligned, and that models developed for a particular context are relevant in other, distinct contexts.

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2016

In Search of Strategic Direction: Digital Preservation in the Academy

Description

Video recording of the NHPRC Electronic Records Fellowship Symposium keynote address, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, November 18, 2005.

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Date Created
2005-11-18

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Digital Here Now, Maybe Forever: Collecting and Collaborations

Description

An invited keynote presentation about electronic records advocacy offered at the New England Archivists Fall Meeting, October 12, 2007 at Storrs, Connecticut.

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Date Created
2007-10-12

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Working Together Revisited: Diverse Skills for Sustainability

Description

An invited presentation on digital preservation skills for archival professionals offered at the Persistence of Memory conference hosted by the New England Document Conservation Center at Tucson, Arizona on December 5, 2006.

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Date Created
2006-12-05

E-Records Workshop, University of California

Description

Presentation slides from a workshop on Electronic Records Management and Archives offered to archivists, records managers and technology professionals of the University of California system at Oakland, California from October 26-27, 2006.

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Date Created
2006-10-26

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Developing a Digital Materials Business Strategy

Description

Brief overview presentation created for the Historical Department of the Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona, April 2012.

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2012-04-23