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E-Cigarette and Subsequent Smoking Use and Relationship to E-Cigarette Quit Attempts Among College Students

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The present study investigated the student population at Arizona State University to: (1) assess how electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is associated with subsequent smoking (cigarette, hookah, cigarillo, smokeless tobacco, marijuana) use; (2) investigate the relationship of e-cigarette use with non-electronic

The present study investigated the student population at Arizona State University to: (1) assess how electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use is associated with subsequent smoking (cigarette, hookah, cigarillo, smokeless tobacco, marijuana) use; (2) investigate the relationship of e-cigarette use with non-electronic smoking cessation, and vice versa; and (3) compare how e-cigarette use is associated with cessation of non-electronic smoking. Based on previous related research and tools, the cross-sectional study included an anonymous online screening, followed by a survey that assessed e-cigarette use and non-electronic smoking, e-cigarette withdrawal and cessation, and non-electronic smoking quit attempts. Participants (N=65) were recruited via flyer advertisements, social media advertisements, ASU online advertisements, and email notices. Major findings of this study include: Participants who used non-electronic smoking primarily used cigarettes or marijuana; participants who used both electronic and non-electronic smoking more frequently used e-cigarettes than non-electronic forms; and participants who previously attempted e-cigarette cession believe that they will successfully withdraw from e-cigarette use in the future, by either using marijuana or not using non-electronic smoking in the future. Based on these findings, nurses should assess all youth and young adults for e-cigarette “core constructs”; provide evidence-based interventions; and encourage future, successful e-cigarette cessation.

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2020-05

COVID-19 and College Students: The Relationships among Fear of COVID-19, Preventative Behaviors, & Vaccination Intention

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Objective: This study looked at three key variables of fear of COVID-19, preventative behaviors, and vaccination intent among college students in the United Sates. In addition, the three key variables were compared between genders, age groups, race groups, and over

Objective: This study looked at three key variables of fear of COVID-19, preventative behaviors, and vaccination intent among college students in the United Sates. In addition, the three key variables were compared between genders, age groups, race groups, and over time to see if there were any significant findings. <br/>Method: This longitudinal study consisted of two anonymous online surveys administered on REDCap before and after a COVID-19 vaccine became available. <br/>Results: The findings suggested positive correlations between students’ fear of COVID-19 and their preventative behaviors with the passing of time. Hispanic/Latino participants had significantly higher fear of COVID-19 scores compared to Non-Hispanic Whites and other races at Wave I and II. Participants between 25 and 30 years old had a marginally greater difference fear of COVID-19 score compared to those less than 25. Females had significantly higher mean preventative behavior score than males at Wave II. There was a significant association between race/ethnicity groups and vaccination intent. <br/>Conclusion: Knowing why different groups do not engage in recommended preventative behaviors or receive vaccinations can tell us more about what tailored interventions may need to be developed and implemented to promote health and wellbeing in this population. Further research needs to be done regarding race, gender, and age and how these different groups of college students are responding to COVID-19 and why.

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2021-05

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Addressing Implicit Bias in Mental Healthcare: A Novel Health Promotion Tool for the Treatment of Minority Mental Health Patients

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Minority mental health patients face many health inequities and inequalities that may stem from implicit bias and a lack of cultural awareness from their healthcare providers. I analyzed the current literature evaluating implicit bias among healthcare providers and culturally specific

Minority mental health patients face many health inequities and inequalities that may stem from implicit bias and a lack of cultural awareness from their healthcare providers. I analyzed the current literature evaluating implicit bias among healthcare providers and culturally specific life traumas that Latinos and African Americans face that can impact their mental health. Additionally, I researched a current mental health assessments tool, the Child and Adolescent Trauma Survey (CATS), and evaluated it for the use on Latino and African American patients. Face-to-face interviews with two healthcare providers were also used to analyze the CATS for its’ applicability to Latino and African American patients. Results showed that these assessments were not sufficient in capturing culturally specific life traumas of minority patients. Based on the literature review and analysis of the interviews with healthcare providers, a novel assessment tool, the Culturally Traumatic Events Questionnaire (CTEQ), was created to address the gaps that currently make up other mental health assessment tools used on minority patients.

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2021-05

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College Students' Perceived Risk of COVID-19 Infection, Protective Behaviors, and Vaccination Intent

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“College Students' Perceived Risk of COVID-19 Infection, Protective Behaviors, and Vaccination Intent” is a thesis project based on research conducted from the end of 2020 to the beginning of 2021. This project investigated various protective behavior factors against the Coronavirus

“College Students' Perceived Risk of COVID-19 Infection, Protective Behaviors, and Vaccination Intent” is a thesis project based on research conducted from the end of 2020 to the beginning of 2021. This project investigated various protective behavior factors against the Coronavirus (COVID-19) based on gender, race/ethnicity, and financial difficulty of college students in the United States. The plan for this thesis project was to send out two surveys through Amazon Mturk to a group of 500 college students. The first survey further narrowed down the sample size to include only the participants who met the eligibility factors. A second larger survey was sent to this sample which included the data for this research project. This paper will explore the topics of perceived risk of becoming infected with COVID-19, preventive behaviors, vaccination intent based on gender, race/ethnicity, and financial difficulty.

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2021-05