Matching Items (4)

Japanese-American Internment Camp Collection

Description

A presentation describing technical work, community reaction and publicity associated with an online collection of Arizona Japanese-American internment camp newsletters and related archival materials developed in 2017. The presentation was

A presentation describing technical work, community reaction and publicity associated with an online collection of Arizona Japanese-American internment camp newsletters and related archival materials developed in 2017. The presentation was given at the Arizona Library Association conference in October 2017 and this revised version was presented at the Arizona Archives Summit on February 1, 2018.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-01-18

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ASU in the Postwar Period: Victory Village

Description

Presentation slides regarding the history of Victory Village, the trailer park built in 1945-46 to provide housing for WWII Veterans and their families at Arizona State University's Tempe campus. A

Presentation slides regarding the history of Victory Village, the trailer park built in 1945-46 to provide housing for WWII Veterans and their families at Arizona State University's Tempe campus. A presentation of research from University Archives records conducted in the summer of 2018. The presentation was videotaped as a lecture for Professor Volker Benkert's online World War II history class.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-09-30

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Baptized by saltwater: acts of remembrance and commemoration surrounding the USS Block Islands, CVE-21 & CVE-106

Description

The Second World War has been portrayed as the central event for understanding the history of America in the 20th Century. This dissertation will examine the acts of commemoration and

The Second World War has been portrayed as the central event for understanding the history of America in the 20th Century. This dissertation will examine the acts of commemoration and remembrance by veterans who served on the escort carriers, USS Block Island, CVE-21 & CVE-106. Acts of remembrance and commemoration, in this case, refer to the authorship of memoirs, the donation of symbolic objects that represent military service to museums, and the formation of a veteran's organization, which also serves as a means of social support. I am interested in the way stories of the conflict that fall outside the dominant narratives of the Second World War, namely the famous battles of land, sea, and air, have been commemorated by the veterans who were part of them. Utilizing primary source material and oral histories, I examine how acts of remembrance and commemoration have changed over time. An analysis of the shifting meanings sheds light on how individual memories of the war have changed, in light of the history of the larger war that continues to ignore small ships and sea battles.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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The refugee musician Is now a part of us: musical exiles and Mark Brunswick's National Committee for Refugee Musicians (1938-1943)

Description

In the early-twentieth-century United States, Jewish and European immigrant scholars, musicians, and composers dominated the academic, orchestral, film and popular music scenes. While some of these musicians immigrated voluntarily, others,

In the early-twentieth-century United States, Jewish and European immigrant scholars, musicians, and composers dominated the academic, orchestral, film and popular music scenes. While some of these musicians immigrated voluntarily, others, having fled the genocide of the Holocaust, were forced into exile due to religious and political persecution. Musicians were often targeted by the Nazi regime for performing and advancing banned music, composing modernist works, or for their religious or political beliefs. The United States upheld strict, pre-World War Two immigration quotas and laws that limited relocation. Specialized rescue agencies arose to help these exiles settle in the United States.

Meanwhile in 1924, American composer Mark Brunswick (1902-1971) moved to Europe and later studied with Nadia Boulanger. He found his niche among members of the Second Viennese School. Brunswick returned to the United States in 1938 and founded the National Committee for Refugee Musicians (NCRM), originally called the Placement Committee for German and Austrian Musicians, to aid in the relocation and job placement of at-risk musicians and their families during World War Two.

This thesis briefly explores Brunswick’s life, and then more closely addresses the formation of the NCRM, its members, those who received aid, and partnering organizations. Finally, cases in point illustrate the varied ways in which the NCRM helped musicians in exile. Brunswick and the Committee played a major role in American musical history, yet no major studies have focused on them. With the NCRM’s assistance, many refugees thrived in and contributed to America’s musical landscape. By exploring letters, memoranda, and other unpublished archival documents, I will show how Brunswick and the NCRM affected U.S. musical life beginning in the 1930s. The positive effects of this germinal group endure today.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015