Matching Items (22)

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Crew Balance in Construction Tasks for Productivity Analysis - A Sustainability Perspective

Description

The following report followed three separate construction crews at a construction site at ASU and performed labor productivity analysis to quantitatively measure the efficiency of the workers performing specific tasks. These crews were tasked with electrical wiring, concrete pouring, and

The following report followed three separate construction crews at a construction site at ASU and performed labor productivity analysis to quantitatively measure the efficiency of the workers performing specific tasks. These crews were tasked with electrical wiring, concrete pouring, and drywall sanding. Crew balance measured the down time of individual crew members compared to the overall time spent on a task, and the results of these observations were calculated, and suggested improvements given.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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The Helping Hand Run Partnership

Description

The Helping Hand Run is a 5k/10k fun run benefiting Hospice of the Valley's pediatric unit for children with life-limiting illnesses. Chapter members of Alpha Kappa Psi professional business fraternity at Arizona State University initiated this annual event in 2008,

The Helping Hand Run is a 5k/10k fun run benefiting Hospice of the Valley's pediatric unit for children with life-limiting illnesses. Chapter members of Alpha Kappa Psi professional business fraternity at Arizona State University initiated this annual event in 2008, and I was the event Chair for the 2016 and 2017 races. In the past this leadership role was notoriously difficult, as there were no pass-along documents. Fraternity brothers held their breath before committee placement results in hopes their name wouldn't be on the "Helping Hand Run Committee" line. Each year the committee started from scratch with no tangible documentation of how previous coordinators pulled off the run. My thesis reads as a partial narrative intermixed with summary; these stories stem from my two years in overseeing the Helping Hand Run and the third year in serving as an informal mentor to the committee after stepping down as Chair. The symbolism of the narrative style is intentional, as my formal preparation for undertaking this leadership role consisted of a 20-minute conversation with the previous event Chair. The purpose of my thesis twofold: exploring how project continuity and pass-along documents contribute to event sustainability and also in assessing how teaming promotes social unity. Through my experience in coordinating the 8th and 9th Helping Hand Runs, I identified and created an opportunity to improve two distinct communities: Alpha Kappa Psi and Hospice of the Valley. This is largely displayed through authoring the Helping Hand Run Project Plan (See Appendix D). This document contains a variety of resources including an introduction of the project, Hospice of the Valley, and event history, descriptions of committee member roles and responsibilities, thank you note templates, contact information, and more. While the Project Plan is helpful, a significant amount of information is now easily accessible to event coordinators on the Helping Hand Run Gmail Google Drive. Combined, the resources found in the Guide and Google Drive is all information I wish I had when being handed the event. With more involvement from my chapter and a solid foundation of documented resources, ultimately my fraternity now has the tools necessary to carry out a more impactful and lucrative event to support local youth in need. Although the Helping Hand Run Project Plan is event-specific, both this tool and the accompanying reflection can be used as a frame of reference for other event planners in terms of important event management information to consider when aiming for project sustainability and continuous improvement.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Exporting the Classroom: A New Paradigm for Education

Description

The purpose of this creative thesis project is to create the framework of an educational class package based off of a course offered at Arizona State University. The course chosen for this project is an honors course titled Deductive Logic:

The purpose of this creative thesis project is to create the framework of an educational class package based off of a course offered at Arizona State University. The course chosen for this project is an honors course titled Deductive Logic: Leadership and Management Techniques and is taught by Dean Kashiwagi, PhD. The class package is designed to be published over an online platform so students and professors from various institutions can access the material. Currently the platform is in its final stages of development and is slated to go live on July of 2014. The future development of the package will be geared towards facilitating interdisciplinary collaboration between institutions based off of course concepts.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2014-05

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Emerge 2016: Fantasy Draft Party 2040

Description

Emerge 2016: Future of Sport 2040 was an event hosted by Emerge Artists+ Scientists Design the Future that took place at Wells Fargo Arena in Tempe, Arizona on April 29th, 2016. The goal of the event was to explore and

Emerge 2016: Future of Sport 2040 was an event hosted by Emerge Artists+ Scientists Design the Future that took place at Wells Fargo Arena in Tempe, Arizona on April 29th, 2016. The goal of the event was to explore and predict the future of sports while allowing the public to participate in the futuristic event that we planned (event visitation). Emerge 2016: Future of Sport 2040 hosted 20 event visitations including Dr. Ingram-Waters' event visitation that focused on the future of fantasy sport with the title \u2014 Fantasy Sport: Draft Party 2040. The goal of this particular event visitation was to obtain significant and viable research results for incorporation in Dr. Ingram-Waters' fantasy football academic work while also delivering entertainment value for event participants. All observations and analysis are based upon the event planning process of the Future of Fantasy Sport: Draft Party 2040. As the author of this analysis, the observations in this report were noted as I served as the project manager on Dr. Ingram-Waters research team. In this role, I was heavily involved in the strategic planning, communication, and event operations of the event visitation full-circle from the ideation phase to the execution phase. This paper analyzes the project management pipeline used for the event production of the event visitation Fantasy Sport: Draft Party 2040. Drawing form the experience of the project management pipeline, this paper examines the management application of the Pareto Principle and Complexity Theory.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

Working to Deliver in Virtual Teams: An Analysis of Communication and Management Strategies through Interviews and a Simulation

Description

To understand the role communication and effective management play in the project management field, virtual work was analyzed in two phases. Phase one consisted of gaining familiarity within the field of project management by interviewing three project managers who discussed

To understand the role communication and effective management play in the project management field, virtual work was analyzed in two phases. Phase one consisted of gaining familiarity within the field of project management by interviewing three project managers who discussed their field of work, how it has changed due to Covid-19, approaches to communication and virtual team management, and strategies that allow for effective project management. Phase two comprised a simulation in which 8 ASU student volunteers were put into scenarios that required completing and executing a given project. Students gained project experience through the simulation and had an opportunity to reflect on their project experience.

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Created

Date Created
2021-05

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The ASU Undergraduate Cookbook: By an ASU Undergraduate Student, For an ASU Undergraduate Student.

Description

This project will be a tribute to my experiences as a person, a chef, and as an ASU student. During my time spent here at ASU I have met a diverse group of people that I call my friends. Every

This project will be a tribute to my experiences as a person, a chef, and as an ASU student. During my time spent here at ASU I have met a diverse group of people that I call my friends. Every time we would spend time together, I would learn about their lives and the experiences they are going through at this university. Everyone I met had a different background, story, and experience. Some of these memorable nights would be spent at my place. Depending on the circumstance, I would cook for my friends, and every time I did, they were amazed by my craft. Growing up, my mother was always working in the realm of fundraising. Through her jobs, we both had the opportunity to meet and work with some of the best chefs the Phoenix valley had to offer. Chefs like Robert Irvine, Mario Batali, Beau MacMillan, Christopher Gross, Michael DiMaria, Eddie Matney, and more. As a child and teenager, my fascination with cooking and food stood out to these figures and many taught me various skills and techniques in the kitchen. I learned to do everything from properly julian tangerines to preparing beef tartar. I even developed from making lemonade on my own when I was two years old to working in a four star restaurant as a line chef at the age of 15. These memories I will be forever grateful for. Through these skills, I have impressed my friends with delicious meals at night. And as we matured through college both in age and living situations, many of my friends have asked to learn from me. The change from freshman dorms to our own houses and townhomes have offered an endless opportunity of options for meals. But, everyone has a different background and skill set when it comes to cooking. A few of my friends have never picked up a knife before and have claimed to “burn water in the microwave.” Others tend to challenge me in preparing meals in their own homes and together we have our own “cookoffs.” From person to person, and living quarter to living quarter, there are many challenges to cooking. This is why I have decided to take the knowledge from my Industrial Engineering classes, my personal cooking skills, and data collected from the student body to create a cookbook for the average ASU student. I plan to include recipes and techniques in the form of Standard Operating Procedures to ensure that the instructions are as easy to follow as they can be. The recipes and techniques I plan to include will encompass data I have collected from the student body. The data will focus around a few key components of any chef and kitchen: tools and appliances available, personal cooking skills, and personal cooking experience. To take on such a challenge, I plan to complete this thesis/creative project in a few direct steps. First and foremost, complete this prospectus (already completed), next, secure funding from ASU for a survey completion incentive. For this survey, I will need a minimum of $250 to distribute between 5 winners. The monetary incentive is to ensure that more than 30 pieces of data (survey responses) are collected from each grade level of students. Next I will send a survey that asks about the aforementioned topics. After the survey is complete, I will collect the data, analyze it, and hone in on the most important and available tools. Finally, I will write stories surrounding my chosen recipes and create said recipes.

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Created

Date Created
2021-05

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Implementation of the best value approach in India

Description

The construction industry in India suffers from major time and cost overruns. Data from government and industry reports suggest that projects suffer from 20 to 25 percent time and cost overruns. Waste of resources has been identified as a major

The construction industry in India suffers from major time and cost overruns. Data from government and industry reports suggest that projects suffer from 20 to 25 percent time and cost overruns. Waste of resources has been identified as a major source of inefficiency. Despite a substantial increase in the past few years, demand for professionals and contractors still exceeds supply by a large margin. The traditional methods adopted in the Indian construction industry may not suffice the needs of this dynamic environment, as they have produced large inefficiencies. Innovative ways of procurement and project management can satisfy the needs aspired to as well as bring added value. The problems faced by the Indian construction industry are very similar to those faced by other developing countries. The objective of this paper is to discuss and analyze the economic concerns, inefficiencies and investigate a model that both explains the Indian construction industry structure and provides a framework to improve efficiencies. The Best Value (BV) model is examined as an approach to be adopted in lieu of the traditional approach. This could result in efficient construction projects by minimizing cost overruns and delays, which until now have been a rarity.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

The Phoenix Imperative: An Alternative Maturity Model for Systems Engineering Service Providers

Description

Providers of systems engineering services and their employees are not always able to be the masters of their own destiny. When working in staff augmentation roles under the auspices of another company, they are typically forced to operate within the

Providers of systems engineering services and their employees are not always able to be the masters of their own destiny. When working in staff augmentation roles under the auspices of another company, they are typically forced to operate within the corporate culture from which they derive their livelihood, following “foreign” processes and procedures, responding to orders and directives. This situation calls for an alternative maturity model for those that provide systems engineering services. While a client organization might be maturing according to any of several proposed models (SEI 1993, SEI 1995, EPIC 1995, ISO 1990, IEEE 1994), the services contractor cannot necessarily be said to be achieving a similar status.

This should not, however, preclude significant maturation goals on the part of the service provider. The Phoenix Imperative is both a business model and maturity model that has worked effectively in several corporations providing system engineering services. It was developed in the context described above and honed over a period of several years with several customers. It provides not only an alternative to the other organizational maturity models that have been proposed, but also delivers the potential for adoption as a personal maturity model for individuals interested in increasing their effectiveness within the context of employment with a service provider.

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Created

Date Created
2010

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Development of the project definition rating index (PDRI) for small industrial projects

Description

Project teams expend substantial effort to develop scope definition during the front end planning phase of large, complex projects, but oftentimes neglect to sufficiently plan for small projects. An industry survey administered by the author showed that small projects make

Project teams expend substantial effort to develop scope definition during the front end planning phase of large, complex projects, but oftentimes neglect to sufficiently plan for small projects. An industry survey administered by the author showed that small projects make up 70-90 percent (by count) of all projects in the industrial construction sector, the planning of these project varies greatly, and that a consistent definition of “small industrial project” did not exist. This dissertation summarizes the motivations and efforts to develop a non-proprietary front end planning tool specifically for small industrial projects, namely the Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI) for Small Industrial Projects. The author was a member of Construction Industry Institute (CII) Research Team 314, who was tasked with developing the tool in May of 2013. The author, together with the research team, reviewed, scrutinized and adapted an existing industrial-focused FEP tool, the PDRI for Industrial Projects, and other resources to develop a set of 41 specific elements relevant to the planning of small industrial projects. The author supported the facilitation of five separate industry workshops where 65 industry professionals evaluated the element descriptions, and provided element prioritization data that was statistically analyzed and used to develop a weighted score sheet that corresponds to the element descriptions. The tool was tested on 54 completed and in-progress projects, the author’s analysis of which showed that small industrial projects with greater scope definition (based on the tool’s scoring scheme) outperformed projects with lesser scope definition regarding cost performance, schedule performance, change performance, financial performance, and customer satisfaction. Moreover, the author found that users of the tool on in-progress projects overwhelmingly agreed that the tool added value to their projects in a timeframe and manner consistent with their needs, and that they would continue using the tool in the future. The author also developed an index-based selection guide to aid PDRI users in choosing the appropriate tool for use on an industrial project based on distinguishing project size with indicators of project complexity. The final results of the author’s research provide several contributions to the front end planning, small projects, and project complexity bodies of knowledge.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2015

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Tools for problem- and project-based learning in sustainability science education: a case study of two undergraduate classes

Description

Teamwork and project management (TPM) tools are important components of sustainability science curricula designed using problem- and project-base learning (PPBL). Tools are additional materials, beyond lectures, readings, and assignments, that structure and facilitate students' learning; they can enhance student teams'

Teamwork and project management (TPM) tools are important components of sustainability science curricula designed using problem- and project-base learning (PPBL). Tools are additional materials, beyond lectures, readings, and assignments, that structure and facilitate students' learning; they can enhance student teams' ability to complete projects and achieve learning outcomes and, if instructors can find appropriate existing tools, can reduce time needed for class design and preparation. This research uses a case study approach to evaluate the effectiveness of five TPM tools in two Arizona State University (ASU) sustainability classes: an introductory (100-level) and a capstone (400-level) class. Data was collected from student evaluations and instructor observations in both classes during Spring 2013 and qualitatively analyzed to identify patterns in tool use and effectiveness. Results suggest how instructors might improve tool effectiveness in other sustainability classes. Work plans and meeting agendas were the most effective TPM tools in the 100-level class, while work plans and codes of collaboration were most effective at the 400 level. Common factors in tool effectiveness include active use and integration of tools into class activities. Suggestions for improving tool effectiveness at both levels include introducing tools earlier in the course, incorporating tools into activities, and helping students link a tool's value to sustainability problem-solving competence. Polling students on prior use and incorporating tool use into project assignments may increase 100 level tool effectiveness; and at the 400 level, improvements may be achieved by introducing tools earlier and coaching students to select, find, and develop relevant tools.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2013