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Intimate coupled photocatalysis and biodegradation on a novel TiO2-coated biofilm carrier

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Intimate coupling of Ti2 photocatalysis and biodegradation (ICPB) offers potential for degrading biorecalcitrant and toxic organic compounds much better than possible with conventional wastewater treatments. This study reports on using a novel sponge-type, Ti2-coated biofilm carrier that shows significant adherence

Intimate coupling of Ti2 photocatalysis and biodegradation (ICPB) offers potential for degrading biorecalcitrant and toxic organic compounds much better than possible with conventional wastewater treatments. This study reports on using a novel sponge-type, Ti2-coated biofilm carrier that shows significant adherence of Ti2 to its exterior and the ability to accumulate biomass in its interior (protected from UV light and free radicals). First, this carrier was tested for ICPB in a continuous-flow photocatalytic circulating-bed biofilm reactor (PCBBR) to mineralize biorecalcitrant organic: 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP). Four mechanisms possibly acting of ICPB were tested separately: TCP adsorption, UV photolysis/photocatalysis, and biodegradation. The carrier exhibited strong TCP adsorption, while photolysis was negligible. Photocatalysis produced TCP-degradation products that could be mineralized and the strong adsorption of TCP to the carrier enhanced biodegradation by relieving toxicity. Validating the ICPB concept, biofilm was protected inside the carriers from UV light and free radicals. ICPB significantly lowered the diversity of the bacterial community, but five genera known to biodegrade chlorinated phenols were markedly enriched. Secondly, decolorization and mineralization of reactive dyes by ICPB were investigated on a refined Ti2-coated biofilm carrier in a PCBBR. Two typical reactive dyes: Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Yellow 86 (RY86), showed similar first-order kinetics when being photocatalytically decolorized at low pH (~4-5), which was inhibited at neutral pH in the presence of phosphate or carbonate buffer, presumably due to electrostatic repulsion from negatively charged surface sites on Ti2, radical scavenging by phosphate or carbonate, or both. In the PCBBR, photocatalysis alone with Ti2-coated carriers could remove RB5 and COD by 97% and 47%, respectively. Addition of biofilm inside macroporous carriers maintained a similar RB5 removal efficiency, but COD removal increased to 65%, which is evidence of ICPB despite the low pH. A proposed ICPB pathway for RB5 suggests that a major intermediate, a naphthol derivative, was responsible for most of the residual COD. Finally, three low-temperature sintering methods, called O, D and DN, were compared based on photocatalytic efficiency and Ti2 adherence. The DN method had the best Ti2-coating properties and was a successful carrier for ICPB of RB5 in a PCBBR.

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2011

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Occurrence and treatment of hexavalent chromium and arsenic in Arizona municipal and industrial waters

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Arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) occur naturally in AZ surface and groundwaters, pose different health impacts, and exhibit different treatment efficacies. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) has newly recognized human health concerns, and State and Federal agencies are evaluating a low Cr(VI)-specific

Arsenic (As) and chromium (Cr) occur naturally in AZ surface and groundwaters, pose different health impacts, and exhibit different treatment efficacies. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) has newly recognized human health concerns, and State and Federal agencies are evaluating a low Cr(VI)-specific maximum contaminant level (MCL) for drinking water. Occurrence of Cr and As in municipal drinking waters and industrial cooling tower waters was quantified by grab samples and compared with sampling results obtained from a new passive sampler developed specifically for Cr(VI). Cr(VI) and As concentrations in groundwater used for cooling tower make-up water concentrations were ~3 ppb and ~4 ppb, respectively, and were concentrated significantly in blowdown water (~20 ppb and ~40 ppb). Based upon pending Cr(VI), As, and other metal regulations, these blowdown waters will need routine monitoring and treatment. Cr(VI) concentrations in a water treatment plant (WTP) raw and finished water samples varied from 0.5 and 2 ppb for grab samples collected every 4 hours for 7 consecutive days using an ISCO sampler. The development of an ion exchange (IX) based passive sampler was validated in the field at the WTP and yielded an average exposure within 1 standard deviation of ISCO sampler grab data. Sampling at both the WTP and cooling towers suggested sources of Cr(III) from treatment chemicals or wood preservatives may exist. Since both facilities use chlorine oxidants, I quantified the apparent (pH=5) second-order rate constant for aqueous chlorine (HOCl/OCl-) with Cr(III) to form Cr(VI) as 0.7 M-1s-1. Under typical conditions (2 ppb Cr(III) ; 2 mg/L Cl2) the half-life for the conversion of Cr(III) to the more toxic form Cr(VI) is 4.7 hours. The occurrence studies in AZ and CA show the Cr(VI) and As treatment of groundwaters will be required to meet stringent Cr(VI) regulations. IX technologies, both strong base anion (SBA) and weak base anion (WBA) resin types were screened (and compared) for Cr removal. The SBA IX process for As removal was optimized by utilizing a reactive iron coagulation and filtration (RCF) process to treat spent IX brine, which was then reused to for SBA resin regeneration.

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2014

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Fate of six neonicotinoids during full-scale wastewater treatment and passage through an engineered wetland

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Six high-production-volume neonicotinoids were traced through a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and engineered wetland located downstream, in a study motivated by reports on these insecticides posing threats to non-target invertebrate species and potentially playing a role in the global

Six high-production-volume neonicotinoids were traced through a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and engineered wetland located downstream, in a study motivated by reports on these insecticides posing threats to non-target invertebrate species and potentially playing a role in the global honeybee colony collapse disorder. An array of automated samplers was deployed in a five-day monitoring campaign and resultant flow-weighted samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using the isotope dilution method. Concentrations in WWTP influent and effluent were 54.7 ± 2.9 and 48.6 ± 2.7 ng/L for imidacloprid, respectively, and 3.7 ± 0.3 and 1.8 ± 0.1 ng/L for acetamiprid, respectively. A mass balance over the WWTP showed no (p=0.09, CI = 95%) removal of imidacloprid, and 56 ± 6% aqueous removal of acetamiprid. In the constructed wetland downstream, a lack of removal was noted for both imidacloprid (from 54.4 ± 3.4 ng/L to 49.9 ± 14.6 ng/L) and acetamiprid (from 2.00 ± 0.03 ng/L to 2.30 ± 0.21 ng/L). Clothianidin was detected only inconsistently in the WWTP and wetland (>2 to 288 ng/L; 60% detection frequency), whereas thiamethoxam (<10 ng/L), thiacloprid (<2 ng/L), and dinotefuran (<180 ng/L) were not detected at all. Thus, imidacloprid and acetamiprid were identified as recalcitrant sewage constituents (estimated U.S. WWTP discharge of 1920- 4780 kg/y) that persist during conventional wastewater treatment to enter U.S. surface waters at potentially harmful concentrations.

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Date Created
2015

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Geochemical analysis of the leachate generated after zero valent metals addition to municipal solid waste

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Zero-Valent Metals (ZVM) are highly reactive materials and have been proved to be effective in contaminant reduction in soils and groundwater remediation. In fact, zero-Valent Iron (ZVI) has proven to be very effective in removing, particularly chlorinated organics, heavy metals,

Zero-Valent Metals (ZVM) are highly reactive materials and have been proved to be effective in contaminant reduction in soils and groundwater remediation. In fact, zero-Valent Iron (ZVI) has proven to be very effective in removing, particularly chlorinated organics, heavy metals, and odorous sulfides. Addition of ZVI has also been proved in enhancing the methane gas generation in anaerobic digestion of activated sludge. However, no studies have been conducted regarding the effect of ZVM stimulation to Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) degradation. Therefore, a collaborative study was developed to manipulate microbial activity in the landfill bioreactors to favor methane production by adding ZVMs. This study focuses on evaluating the effects of added ZVM on the leachate generated from replicated lab scale landfill bioreactors. The specific objective was to investigate the effects of ZVMs addition on the organic and inorganic pollutants in leachate. The hypothesis here evaluated was that adding ZVM including ZVI and Zero Valent Manganese (ZVMn) will enhance the removal rates of the organic pollutants present in the leachate, likely by a putative higher rate of microbial metabolism. Test with six (4.23 gallons) bioreactors assembled with MSW collected from the Salt River Landfill and Southwest Regional Landfill showed that under 5 grams /liter of ZVI and 0.625 grams/liter of ZVMn additions, no significant difference was observed in the pH and temperature data of the leachate generated from these reactors. The conductivity data suggested the steady rise across all reactors over the period of time. The removal efficiency of sCOD was highest (27.112 mg/lit/day) for the reactors added with ZVMn at the end of 150 days for bottom layer, however the removal rate was highest (16.955 mg/lit/day) for ZVI after the end of 150 days of the middle layer. Similar trends in the results was observed in TC analysis. HPLC study indicated the dominance of the concentration of heptanoate and isovalerate were leachate generated from the bottom layer across all reactors. Heptanoate continued to dominate in the ZVMn added leachate even after middle layer injection. IC analysis concluded the chloride was dominant in the leachate generated from all the reactors and there was a steady increase in the chloride content over the period of time. Along with chloride, fluoride, bromide, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate and sulfate were also detected in considerable concentrations. In the summary, the addition of the zero valent metals has proved to be efficient in removal of the organics present in the leachate.

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2019