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Process Improvement and Sustainability: Restructuring the Leadership Scholarship Program Cohort Selection

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Although the Leadership Scholarship Program has seen successful recruiting processes throughout changes in leadership of the program; the organization expressed a need for major overhaul to reevaluate the decisions of the process and to establish backing for those decisions. By

Although the Leadership Scholarship Program has seen successful recruiting processes throughout changes in leadership of the program; the organization expressed a need for major overhaul to reevaluate the decisions of the process and to establish backing for those decisions. By asking current and alumni members of the program about what they would like to see in a future member of the program as well as which parts of the process they found most important, the qualities of a future member of the program could be established and weighted. The goals of the reevaluation were to help eliminate bias, discrepancies between applications with extremely different uncontrollable factors, define points of discrepancies, and establish organizational sustainability while achieving a 100% acceptance rate from offered students. Each of these goals was achieved through methods outlined in the LSP Selection Process Manual that was written as a result of this reevaluation. The manual also outlines ways to improve the process going forward.

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2018-05

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Honey Bee Nutrition and Colony Collapse Disorder: How legislation can curtail bee population decline

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The purpose of this experiment was to test how different nutrition supplementation would affect honey bee lifespan. The use of sugar syrup and pollen as well as protein, probiotic, and vitamin supplement were the independent variables in this experiment. The

The purpose of this experiment was to test how different nutrition supplementation would affect honey bee lifespan. The use of sugar syrup and pollen as well as protein, probiotic, and vitamin supplement were the independent variables in this experiment. The average lifespan of a honey bee (Apis mellifera) is around 30 days depending on climate and time of year (Amdam & Omholt, 2002). This experiment yielded results that would require further testing but was able to conclude that a diet of sugar syrup is not sufficient for honey bees, whereas pollen and probiotic supplement showed positive effects on average lifespan. Protein supplement showed no statistically significant advantage or disadvantage to pollen when it comes to short term supplementation. Considering the importance of nutrition on honey bee lifespan, this paper also explores specific ways legislation can aid in pollinator population decline, considering the impacts of colonies without access to a healthy diet.

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2018-05

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Biomimicry and a Circular Economy in Design: A Product Overview

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The trends of products made by today’s companies follow a traditional linear economy where materials for products and services are taken, made, and then used until they are disposed of. In this model cheap materials are relied on in large

The trends of products made by today’s companies follow a traditional linear economy where materials for products and services are taken, made, and then used until they are disposed of. In this model cheap materials are relied on in large amounts and our current rate of usage is unsustainable. Pollution and climate change are effects of this linear economy, and in order to secure a sustainable future for life on this planet, this model is not fit. A circular business model is the future for companies and products. Circular design and biomimicry are at the forefront of this transition. In conjuncture with the InnovationSpace program, I have developed a product for, and sponsored by, Adidas. The product utilizes a circular business model and a sustainable product ecosystem after using biomimicry as a tool for inspiration. The project was driven by this primary research question presented by Adidas: How can we embrace a true circular economy with far more reuse and recycling incorporated, while ensuring that all products travel from factory to foot in a more sustainable way while providing an engaging consumer experience? The goal
of this project was to generate solutions that can be applied to a broad range of products at Adidas.
The product developed is called Neomod, a modular shoe system. People buy shoes both for fashion and function, with the average American owning nineteen pairs. However, countless numbers of partially worn shoes end up in landfills because the materials they are made of are difficult to separate and replace. This is why we designed Neomod; a modular shoe made with interchangeable parts. It makes recycling shoes simpler, but at the same time, provides users with a variety of styles to mix and match to fit their lifestyle. Neomod’s goal is to minimize the amount of waste created and allows all parts of the shoe to be used until its end of life. As consumers buy, recycle, and reuse Neomod shoes, they will help the world work towards a more circular economy.

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2018-05

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The Social Construction of the United States-Mexican Border: A Content Analysis of Two Newspapers

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This study examines the social construction of the border by researching how frequently select issues are written about by the media of both countries, and in what light two different groups of actors (Mexico and the US) are portrayed. The

This study examines the social construction of the border by researching how frequently select issues are written about by the media of both countries, and in what light two different groups of actors (Mexico and the US) are portrayed. The Dallas-based The Dallas Morning News, and the Monterrey-based, El Norte are the two newspapers chosen to perform the content analysis. Furthermore, this study seeks to examine differences in the way both newspapers portray the US-Mexico border in 1994, or the year NAFTA began, and 2012, the most recent year for which data is available. A major find of this study is the discovery of how even though the frequency that select issues are brought up in the border vary drastically by year and newspaper, portrayals of the actors around the border stay fairly consistent. More specifically, with the exception of NAFTA in 1994, border issues outside of crime, illegal immigration, drug violence, and the economy, are rarely mentioned by the two selected newspapers a significant amount of the time. Also, issues at the border such as crime, drug violence, and national security are often portrayed as the fault of Mexico and Mexican actors, while immigration issues at the border are often blamed exclusively on each newspaper's host countries.

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Date Created
2014-05

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The Ethics of Food Localization

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The globalized food system has caused detriments to the environment, to economic justice, and to social and health rights within the food system. Due to an increasing concern over these problems, there has been a popular turn back to a

The globalized food system has caused detriments to the environment, to economic justice, and to social and health rights within the food system. Due to an increasing concern over these problems, there has been a popular turn back to a localized food system. Localization's main principle is reconnecting the producer and consumer while advocating for healthy, local, environmentally friendly, and socially just food. I give utilitarian reasons within a Kantian ethical framework to argue that while partaking in a local food system may be morally good, we cannot advocate for localization as a moral obligation. It is true from empirical research that localizing food could solve many of the environmental, economic, social, and health problems that exist today due to the food system. However, many other countries depend upon the import/export system to keep their own poverty rates low and economies thriving. Utilitarian Peter Singer argues that it would be irresponsible to stop our business with those other countries because we would be causing more harm than good. There are reasons to support food localization, and reasons to reject food localization. Food localization is a moral good in respect to the many benefits that it has, yet it is not a moral obligation due to some of the detriments it may itself cause.

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Date Created
2015-05