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Eat In, Not Out: A Comparative Analysis Between at Home Cooking and Restaurant Dining

Description

This creative project seeks to demonstrate the nutritional and financial benefits of cooking in versus eating out to college age students. We sought to determine what factors significantly differentiated restaurant meals versus home-cooked versions, and how we could share this

This creative project seeks to demonstrate the nutritional and financial benefits of cooking in versus eating out to college age students. We sought to determine what factors significantly differentiated restaurant meals versus home-cooked versions, and how we could share this information with our peers to potentially influence them to make a healthy lifestyle change. The first step was to determine the factors that influence college-aged students eating habits, and was presented with a review of relevant literature in several topics. We researched food literacy in young adults, the impact of fast food, social media's role in healthy eating habits, health behavior change in young adults, and the benefits of home cooking to obtain a general baseline of the knowledge of college-aged students. The initial research was utilized to write more effective blog posts that appropriately addressed our targeted demographic and to determine what platforms would be most appropriate to convey our information. These ideas were taken and then translated into a blog and Instagram account that contained healthy, copycat recipes of popular restaurant meals. We wrote 30 blog posts which were made up of 20 original recipes, 8 nutrition informational posts, and an introduction/conclusion. Finally, a focus group was hosted to ascertain the opinions of our peers, and to determine if they would be willing to make a lifestyle change in the form of cooking more frequently as opposed to eating out regularly. We provided them with a pre and post survey to gather their opinions before and after reviewing the findings of our research and project. We concluded that if given the information in an accessible way, college students are willing to eat in, not out.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

Nutrition Education Video Series for the Improvement of Arizona State University Student Health

Description

Most reliable nutrition information can be found online, but it can be nearly impossible to differentiate from the unreliable blogs and websites that claim their information is correct. Because of this, it can be difficult for students to determine which

Most reliable nutrition information can be found online, but it can be nearly impossible to differentiate from the unreliable blogs and websites that claim their information is correct. Because of this, it can be difficult for students to determine which information is true and which advice they will follow. During this time of growth and learning, it is essential that students have access to accurate information that will help them to be healthier individuals for years to come. The goal of this project was to provide students with an easily accessible and reliable resource for nutrition information that was presented in a simple and relatable way. The following videos and attached materials were created in response to ASU student needs and will be available for students on the ASU wellness website. Eating Healthy on a Budget: https://youtu.be/H-IUArD0phY Healthy Choices at Fast Food Restaurants: https://youtu.be/ZxcjBblpRtM Quick Healthy Meals: https://youtu.be/7uIDFe15-dM

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Created

Date Created
2017-12

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Body Image, Eating Behaviors, and Wellness

Description

Introduction: A mini-documentary consisting of 4 student interviews and 1 professional interview was created for the purpose of providing examples of how body image and eating behaviors affect overall wellness and starting more conversation of this topic. Literature Review: A

Introduction: A mini-documentary consisting of 4 student interviews and 1 professional interview was created for the purpose of providing examples of how body image and eating behaviors affect overall wellness and starting more conversation of this topic. Literature Review: A review of some of the current literature involving body image and wellness interventions suggests that body image is a significant factor of health and wellbeing. Wellness interventions, mostly "non-diet" approaches, that omit weight loss as a primary goal could be a suitable solution for some people wanting to make sustainable healthy lifestyle changes. The social media site, YouTube, was chosen to share the documentary based on the ability of social media to reach more people, engage them, and spread messages and information quickly. Methods: Participants of the video were volunteers responding to an ad posted on the Barrett, the Honors College daily newsletter. Michelle May, M.D. was interviewed to provide a professional perspective on the subject. Questions asked of the student participants were meant to provide examples of how each of their relationships with their bodies and food affected their ideas of health and vice versa. Final Video: The final video, titled "Food & You" can be found on YouTube: https://youtu.be/ShmAzlx2GhM Discussion and Conclusion: Overall, weight and body size still seem to play a role in the ideas the students interviewed have of health. As more research into improving body image is done, knowing how to add this to personal and health professional practice should be encouraged. Moving away from the weight-focused idea of health could improve body image and overall wellness.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-12

Anti-Inflammatory Cookbook for Diabetic Patients

Description

The purpose of this cookbook is to provide pre-diabetic, type 1 and type 2 diabetics with a foundation of recipes. These recipes have been created with the intent of regulating inflammation which can be caused by such metabolic abnormalities. I

The purpose of this cookbook is to provide pre-diabetic, type 1 and type 2 diabetics with a foundation of recipes. These recipes have been created with the intent of regulating inflammation which can be caused by such metabolic abnormalities. I want to educate patients who suffer from these conditions that there are several ingredients that work alongside their condition rather than feeling that they are limited to foods and recipes. I want to increase patients moral and self-efficacy to explore and work with new ingredients. These series of recipes should be used as a guide to trying new foods however patients should know that they are able to add their own ingredients that are suitable to their liking or condition.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-12

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Morality And Disgust In Food Preferences

Description

How are perceptions of morality and disgust regarding meat consumption related to each other? Which factor is more salient in determining one's willingness to eat the meat of a specific animal? How do these answers vary across religious groups? This

How are perceptions of morality and disgust regarding meat consumption related to each other? Which factor is more salient in determining one's willingness to eat the meat of a specific animal? How do these answers vary across religious groups? This study investigates the ways that concepts like morality and disgust are related to food preferences and hopes to shed light on the mechanisms that enforce culturally sanctioned food taboos. The study compares 4 groups of people in the U.S.: Christians (n = 39), Hindus (n = 29), Jews (n = 23), and non-religious people (n = 63). A total of 154 participants were given surveys in which they rated their feelings about eating various animals. Data from Christian and non-religious groups exhibited similar patterns such as a high likelihood of eating a given animal when starving, while results from Jews and Hindus were consistent with their religion's respective food taboos. Despite these differences, morality and disgust are strongly correlated with one another in almost all instances. Moreover, morality and disgust are almost equally important considerations when determining willingness to eat when starving.

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Created

Date Created
2014-12

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Asymmetries of Ground Reaction Forces among Dancers and Non-Dancers

Description

The purpose of this study was to determine if there were asymmetries in ground reaction forces (GRF) between dancers and non-dancers, and to see the effect of GRF on external (ER) and internal rotator (IR) strength. Subjects performed double- and

The purpose of this study was to determine if there were asymmetries in ground reaction forces (GRF) between dancers and non-dancers, and to see the effect of GRF on external (ER) and internal rotator (IR) strength. Subjects performed double- and single-legged jumps on a force plate with a motion capture marker system attached at anatomical landmarks, and then had strength and range of motion (ROM) of their internal and external rotators tested along at degrees of hip flexion. There were no significant differences in GRF between legs for all subjects involved. However, stronger hip ER was negatively correlated with vertical GRF (z-axis), positively correlated with anteroposterior (y-axis) GRF, and higher mediolateral (x-axis) GRF from double-leg trials was positively correlated with knee abduction. Thus, future studies should further investigate GRF broken into axial components as well as the time to peak GRF to determine any relation of these factors to knee valgus and ACL injury risk.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013-05