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Characterization of cost excess in cloud applications

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The pay-as-you-go economic model of cloud computing increases the visibility, traceability, and verifiability of software costs. Application developers must understand how their software uses resources when running in the cloud in order to stay within budgeted costs and/or produce expected

The pay-as-you-go economic model of cloud computing increases the visibility, traceability, and verifiability of software costs. Application developers must understand how their software uses resources when running in the cloud in order to stay within budgeted costs and/or produce expected profits. Cloud computing's unique economic model also leads naturally to an earn-as-you-go profit model for many cloud based applications. These applications can benefit from low level analyses for cost optimization and verification. Testing cloud applications to ensure they meet monetary cost objectives has not been well explored in the current literature. When considering revenues and costs for cloud applications, the resource economic model can be scaled down to the transaction level in order to associate source code with costs incurred while running in the cloud. Both static and dynamic analysis techniques can be developed and applied to understand how and where cloud applications incur costs. Such analyses can help optimize (i.e. minimize) costs and verify that they stay within expected tolerances. An adaptation of Worst Case Execution Time (WCET) analysis is presented here to statically determine worst case monetary costs of cloud applications. This analysis is used to produce an algorithm for determining control flow paths within an application that can exceed a given cost threshold. The corresponding results are used to identify path sections that contribute most to cost excess. A hybrid approach for determining cost excesses is also presented that is comprised mostly of dynamic measurements but that also incorporates calculations that are based on the static analysis approach. This approach uses operational profiles to increase the precision and usefulness of the calculations.

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Date Created
2012

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Graph Search as a Feature in Imperative/Procedural Programming Languages

Description

Graph theory is a critical component of computer science and software engineering, with algorithms concerning graph traversal and comprehension powering much of the largest problems in both industry and research. Engineers and researchers often have an accurate view of their

Graph theory is a critical component of computer science and software engineering, with algorithms concerning graph traversal and comprehension powering much of the largest problems in both industry and research. Engineers and researchers often have an accurate view of their target graph, however they struggle to implement a correct, and efficient, search over that graph.

To facilitate rapid, correct, efficient, and intuitive development of graph based solutions we propose a new programming language construct - the search statement. Given a supra-root node, a procedure which determines the children of a given parent node, and optional definitions of the fail-fast acceptance or rejection of a solution, the search statement can conduct a search over any graph or network. Structurally, this statement is modelled after the common switch statement and is put into a largely imperative/procedural context to allow for immediate and intuitive development by most programmers. The Go programming language has been used as a foundation and proof-of-concept of the search statement. A Go compiler is provided which implements this construct.

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Created

Date Created
2018

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New methodology of automatic design collaboration

Description

When software design teams attempt to collaborate on different design docu-

ments they suffer from a serious collaboration problem. Designers collaborate either in person or remotely. In person collaboration is expensive but effective. Remote collaboration is inexpensive but inefficient. In, order

When software design teams attempt to collaborate on different design docu-

ments they suffer from a serious collaboration problem. Designers collaborate either in person or remotely. In person collaboration is expensive but effective. Remote collaboration is inexpensive but inefficient. In, order to gain the most benefit from collaboration there needs to be remote collaboration that is not only cheap but also as efficient as physical collaboration.

Remotely collaborating on software design relies on general tools such as Word, and Excel. These tools are then shared in an inefficient manner by using either email, cloud based file locking tools, or something like google docs. Because these tools either increase the number of design building blocks, or limit the number

of available times in which one can work on a specific document, they drastically decrease productivity.

This thesis outlines a new methodology to increase design productivity, accom- plished by providing design specific collaboration. Using version control systems, this methodology allows for effective project collaboration between remotely lo- cated design teams. The methodology of this paper encompasses role management, policy management, and design artifact management, including nonfunctional re- quirements. Version control can be used for different design products, improving communication and productivity amongst design teams. This thesis outlines this methodology and then outlines a proof of concept tool that embodies the core of these principles.

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Date Created
2016