Matching Items (4)

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YouTube and Copyright Infringement

Description

The Internet has slowly over the past couple of decades has evolved greatly while also growing into its own community. Websites such as Facebook, Twitter, and even YouTube have developed their own trends, cultures, and communities. Certain people have chosen

The Internet has slowly over the past couple of decades has evolved greatly while also growing into its own community. Websites such as Facebook, Twitter, and even YouTube have developed their own trends, cultures, and communities. Certain people have chosen to earn their livelihood over the Internet through websites and deals with companies. In these dealings, legal matters start to take a major role as people try to review and utilize other peoples’ work to supplement their own. As a Business Law major, I aimed to delve into the legal troubles and dealings of those who wish to form a career on the website YouTube. While the intent of the work is to be informational, I will conclude with what I believe to be improvements possible for the system based on information found. With all the evidence considered, I will advocate for changes to the manual claim system by increasing human moderation as well as necessitating manual review prior to deletion of channels.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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A "",field_main_title:"reasonable reader of poetry's" briefed introduction: a Sam Harris application on the lack of authorship in poetry and poems

Description

The following thesis document entitled, "A 'Reasonable Reader of Poetry's' Briefed Introduction: A Sam Harris Application on the Lack of Authorship in Poetry and Poems" explores the concept of writing itself applied to the world of poetry. This document uses

The following thesis document entitled, "A 'Reasonable Reader of Poetry's' Briefed Introduction: A Sam Harris Application on the Lack of Authorship in Poetry and Poems" explores the concept of writing itself applied to the world of poetry. This document uses Sam Harris' critique and redefinition of free will as an illusion applied to authorship and the concept of self within poetry. This thesis upholds Sam Harris' application of the illusion of free will against and within conventions of experimental poetry to do with the persona poem, deviated syntax, memory, Confessionalist poetry, and so on. The document pulls in examples from Modernist poetry, Confessionalist poetry, prose poetry, contemporary poetry, L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poetry, and experimental poetry. This thesis ends with the conclusion that further research needs to be done with regard to how this lack of authorship applies to copyright law within the poetry field.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2015

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Intellectual property is not property: copyright and the culture of owning a myth

Description

The purpose of this study is to explore the shifting cultural norms of copyright law, and that concept’s impact on the performance and practice of artists producing original works of authorship. Although related concepts predate it, and today it exists

The purpose of this study is to explore the shifting cultural norms of copyright law, and that concept’s impact on the performance and practice of artists producing original works of authorship. Although related concepts predate it, and today it exists as a subset of a broader category known as intellectual property, the purpose of copyright beginning with the United States Constitution was to allow for a temporary economic monopoly to an author of a fixed creative work. This monopoly was meant to incentivize authors to contribute to the public good with works that promote progress in science and art. However, increases over time in the scope and duration of copyright terms grant broader protections and controls for copyright owners today, while advances in technology have provided the public with the potential for near-limitless low-cost access to information. This creates a conflict between proprietary interest in creative works and the public’s right and ability to access and build on those works. The history of copyright law in America is rife with efforts to balance these competing interests.

The methodology for this study consisted of flexible strategies for collecting and analyzing data, primarily elite, semi-structured interviews with professional artists, attorneys, and others who engage with the cultural and legal norms of intellectual property regimes on a regular basis. Constant comparative analysis was used to maintain an emic perspective, prioritizing the subjective experience of individuals interviewed for this research project. Additional methods for qualitative analysis were also employed here to code and categorize gathered data, including the use of RQDA, a software package for Qualitative Data Analysis that runs within the R statistical software program. Various patterns and behaviors relevant to intellectual property reforms as they relate to artist practices were discussed in detail following the analysis of findings, in an effort to describe how cultural norms of copyright intersect with the creation of original works of authorship, and towards the development of the theory that the semiotic sign systems subject to intellectual property laws are not themselves forms of real property, as they do not meet the categorical requirements of scarce resources.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018