Matching Items (6)

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Embargoes and Federally Funded Research

Description

Limiting the immediate access to content, embargoes are designed by publishers to ensure the economic sustainability of their business by requiring users to rely on the purchase of licensing agreements

Limiting the immediate access to content, embargoes are designed by publishers to ensure the economic sustainability of their business by requiring users to rely on the purchase of licensing agreements via subscription models. Comparatively, Open Access models which eliminate traditional pay-walls, are gaining prominence for immediate access and reduction of copyright barriers between readers and articles. Wishing to facilitate expanded access to scientific research, the White House sought to implement policy for the timely release of government funded research to the public. For proponents of Open Access, legislation by the House of Representatives in the FIRST Act imposed significant barriers to the public’s timely access of government funded research. Alongside rising subscription costs and increasing advocacy for Open Access, recent actions by the United States and European Union to reduce embargo periods for scientific research have brought to the forefront questions of properly defining the duration of embargoes for publicly funded research.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Paying to Publish: Open Access Author Fees and Libraries’ Initiative to Fund Publishing Costs

Description

To pay associated publishing costs with Open Access (OA), academic libraries are providing researchers affiliated with the university the funds necessary to publish in OA journals. Structured to reimburse

To pay associated publishing costs with Open Access (OA), academic libraries are providing researchers affiliated with the university the funds necessary to publish in OA journals. Structured to reimburse the author fees for a researcher’s accepted manuscript to an OA journal; these funds support the dissemination of scholarship and promote the benefits of OA. With numerous academic libraries in the United States operating a fund to pay publishing costs, librarians are adapting their strategies for addressing popular demand from researchers by reevaluating submission criteria; specifically prioritizing based on need for young researchers in adjunct positions or doctoral candidates and reducing financial expenditure per researcher to expand allocation to additional people.

The essay seeks to effectively identify and compare strategies used by libraries throughout the United States. Beyond analyzing the structure of author funds, the essay explores the value of such programs in promoting OA values of not only free to read, but free to publish. Asking the question, are libraries best suited to expend resources by paying publishing fees and does it achieve its purpose of promoting OA journals? Overall, the essay outlines the role of OA in expanding the potential for libraries to develop its role in scholarly publishing; particularly by promoting researchers’ publications in OA journals using author funds.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-09

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Open Access Week and Graduate College Workshop

Description

Published in Learning Exchange, a newsletter of the Learning Round Table of the American Library Association, the article details an ASU Libraries and Office of Graduate Education collaborative program.

Published in Learning Exchange, a newsletter of the Learning Round Table of the American Library Association, the article details an ASU Libraries and Office of Graduate Education collaborative program. Occurring during the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Research Coalition (SPARC) sponsored Open Access (OA) week, the program endeavored to inform the students of the benefits of OA and promote the library’s digital repository to graduate students. The program discussed the publication of students’ theses and dissertations in the library’s digital repository and dispelled associated myths of its impact on future research potential. The article is designed to inform and inspire information professionals in creating similar programs. © Copyright 1997-2014, American Library AssociationThis document may be reprinted and distributed for non-commercial and educational purposes only, and not for resale. No resale use may be made of material on this website at any time. All other rights reserved.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Visualizing the Embryo: Establishing Procedures for Digital image Production with the Embryo Project

Description

The Embryo Project (EP) Encyclopedia is an online database that has consolidated hundreds of development-related research articles, with subcategories addressing the context of such research. These articles are written by

The Embryo Project (EP) Encyclopedia is an online database that has consolidated hundreds of development-related research articles, with subcategories addressing the context of such research. These articles are written by undergraduate students, graduate students, and professionals in the fields of biology, history, and other fields, and are intended for a diverse audience of readers from both biology and non-biology related backgrounds. As the EP addresses a public audience, it is imperative to utilize all possible means to share the information that each article covers. Until 2013, the EP Encyclopedia did not present images in articles as no formal protocol for image development existed. I have created an image style guide that outlines the basic steps of creating and submitting an image that can complement an EP article and can enhance a reader's understanding of the discussed concept. In creating this style guide, I investigated similar protocols used by other scientific journals and medical professionals. I also used different programs and based my style guide off of the procedures I used in Adobe Illustrator CS6.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Navigating the Wild West of Open Access Publishing

Description

There’s a “Gold rush” happening in the new frontier of open access publishing! As publishers experiment with new business models, there’s an explosion of new journal titles and publishers. In

There’s a “Gold rush” happening in the new frontier of open access publishing! As publishers experiment with new business models, there’s an explosion of new journal titles and publishers. In the tradition of all boomtowns, outlaws move in as well as upstanding citizens - and they often look alike. With no real marshall in town, how can librarians sort out the good guys from the bad?

This discussion will guide you through the wild landscape of open access journal publishing, the advantages and disadvantages for libraries and authors, and give tips on sizing up the good, the bad, and the ugly.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-09-25

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Education scholars' perceptions and practices toward open access publishing

Description

Although open access publishing has been available since 1998, we know little regarding scholars' perceptions and practices toward publishing in open access outlets, especially in the social science community. Open

Although open access publishing has been available since 1998, we know little regarding scholars' perceptions and practices toward publishing in open access outlets, especially in the social science community. Open access publishing has been slow to penetrate the field of education, yet the potential impact of open access could make this publishing method an important innovation for understanding how to support the publishing needs of education scholars. To discover these perceptions and practices that education scholars have toward open access publishing, a 51-item web-based survey was provided to scholars with known investment in open access publishing. Participants had either (1) a publication in one of 34 United States education-based open access journals or (2) a manuscript submitted for peer review in one of those 34 journals. The survey contained subscales focusing on contemporary open access themes--issues identified through a comprehensive analysis of the major outlets for scholarly news in education. Through open and axial coding, several themes were extracted. They included rights and ease of access, ease of publishing, costs, support from colleagues and administrators, and perceived quality of open access outlets. The survey showed moderate to high reliability using Cronbach's alpha. Correlation and MANOVA testing showed significant results in scholars' teaching status and peer review status of manuscripts. Additional findings indicated that non-tenured education scholars responded more strongly than tenured scholars to issues related to rights and ease of access, promotion, and quality. Scholars with manuscripts currently in peer review felt strongly about themes of rights and ease of access, cost, and promotion. The results imply the following: (1) If scholars want their research read by a wider audience, they should publish in open access journals. (2) Pro-open access policies and procedures could gain more support by ensuring open access is promoted to non-tenured scholars seeking to publish. (3) More research, forums, discussions, and education about open access need to occur in greater abundance to continue to ameliorate scholars' views about the benefits of open access publishing. (4) Institutions and departments can offer their unconditional support for open access publishing as a method of meeting promotion/tenure requirements.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012