Matching Items (3)

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Producing positive perceptions: effects of video production in instructor introduction videos on student perceptions

Description

This mixed methods study examined instructor introduction videos for use in online learning. This study intended to identify the influence of video production value on student perceptions of student-instructor intent, specifically in the areas of perceived student-instructor communication and student-instructor

This mixed methods study examined instructor introduction videos for use in online learning. This study intended to identify the influence of video production value on student perceptions of student-instructor intent, specifically in the areas of perceived student-instructor communication and student-instructor connection. This study also examined which production style most accurately aligns student perceptions with instructor intent as well as which video production style is preferred by students.

Using a set of production guidelines, an instructor produced two introduction videos; one of low production value, one of high production value. Student participants were surveyed on their perceptions of the instructor as featured in both videos. The instructor was interviewed using similar questions in order to identify instructor intent and compare instructor intent to student perceptions.

Analysis of data showed that there was no statistical difference between video production value in students’ perceived student-instructor connection or student-instructor communication when compared to the instructor’s intent in the same areas. Data analysis also showed that a high production value was more accurate in portraying instructor intent, however a low production value was preferred by students and portrayed the instructor more positively.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019

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Improving Online Instructor Presence and Student Engagement: An Online Professional Development Intervention

Description

The purpose of the project was to explore the extent to which an asynchronous online professional development (PD) model focusing on instructor presence would improve feedback and interactions with students. The study is grounded in Community of Inquiry theory, which

The purpose of the project was to explore the extent to which an asynchronous online professional development (PD) model focusing on instructor presence would improve feedback and interactions with students. The study is grounded in Community of Inquiry theory, which situates learning at the intersection of teaching presence, social presence and cognitive presence. The study aimed to improve student success by empowering instructors to integrate engaging strategies and technology tools into fully online courses. The participants were 4 higher education instructors teaching in fully online degree programs delivered to 160-200 undergraduate students. For eight weeks the 4 instructors participated in the PD. The goals of the PD were to learn strategies for improving instructor presence and integrating student engagement opportunities in a collaborative online format. Data was collected from pre- and post-intervention offerings of the instructors’ courses to determine the impact of participation in the PD. Results suggest that the PD model was an effective intervention to increase presence and engagement. Presence and engagement were found to have increased in participants’ courses. Interactive video was found to serve multiple purposes including increasing instructor presence and student engagement, facilitating feedback between instructors and students, and elevating the level of cognitive presence of students. As a result, instructors and students both indicated a perception of improved interactions and feedback.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020

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Students’ Perceptions of Engagement in Online Courses and Its Effect on Academic Performance and Retention Rates

Description

Online learning in higher education has been increasing over the last two decades (NCES, 2016). Previous research has highlighted the importance of student engagement for academic achievement and performance (Fuller, Wilson, & Tobin, 2011; Northey et al., 2018).

Online learning in higher education has been increasing over the last two decades (NCES, 2016). Previous research has highlighted the importance of student engagement for academic achievement and performance (Fuller, Wilson, & Tobin, 2011; Northey et al., 2018). The current study aims to further understand students’ perceptions of peer interactions, assess the application of the Theory of Involvement in online learning environments, and identify factors of student engagement. Data were collected from 1,514 undergraduate students enrolled in online courses at Arizona State University (Mage = 25.96 years old; SD = 7.64; 1,259 female, 232 male, 12 non-binary, and 1 gender fluid). The results of this dissertation study indicate that the vast majority of students (94% of the sample) want opportunities for peer interaction in their online courses. Confirmatory Factor Analyses were conducted to validate three of the primary measures and these measurement models were used in subsequent analyses. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) revealed that students who demonstrated high levels of Academic, Online Community, Life Application, and Social Engagement were more likely to perform well on measures of Academic Performance (i.e., doing well on quizzes or tests, earning higher letter grades). Additional SEM analyses indicated that sense of a community was related to all four aspects of student engagements. There was evidence that certain pedagogical factors were also associated with higher rates of student engagement. For example, students who reported high levels for Instructional Design (e.g., felt the course objectives were clear) were more likely to be academically engaged (i.e., demonstrated strong study habits). Lastly, while there were no significant differences in student engagement by gender, ethnicity, or living arrangements, students who valued peer interaction were more likely to report higher levels of Online Student Engagement. The findings of this research emphasize the desire online students have to interact with their peers, demonstrates the importance of engaging online students, and serves as a guide for educators in creating online courses that foster student engagement.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021