Matching Items (3)

153850-Thumbnail Image.png

A test and confidence set for comparing the location of quadratic growth curves

Description

Quadratic growth curves of 2nd degree polynomial are widely used in longitudinal studies. For a 2nd degree polynomial, the vertex represents the location of the curve in the XY plane. For a quadratic growth curve, we propose an approximate confidence

Quadratic growth curves of 2nd degree polynomial are widely used in longitudinal studies. For a 2nd degree polynomial, the vertex represents the location of the curve in the XY plane. For a quadratic growth curve, we propose an approximate confidence region as well as the confidence interval for x and y-coordinates of the vertex using two methods, the gradient method and the delta method. Under some models, an indirect test on the location of the curve can be based on the intercept and slope parameters, but in other models, a direct test on the vertex is required. We present a quadratic-form statistic for a test of the null hypothesis that there is no shift in the location of the vertex in a linear mixed model. The statistic has an asymptotic chi-squared distribution. For 2nd degree polynomials of two independent samples, we present an approximate confidence region for the difference of vertices of two quadratic growth curves using the modified gradient method and delta method. Another chi-square test statistic is derived for a direct test on the vertex and is compared to an F test statistic for the indirect test. Power functions are derived for both the indirect F test and the direct chi-square test. We calculate the theoretical power and present a simulation study to investigate the power of the tests. We also present a simulation study to assess the influence of sample size, measurement occasions and nature of the random effects. The test statistics will be applied to the Tell Efficacy longitudinal study, in which sound identification scores and language protocol scores for children are modeled as quadratic growth curves for two independent groups, TELL and control curriculum. The interpretation of shift in the location of the vertices is also presented.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015

156932-Thumbnail Image.png

New statistical transfer learning models for health care applications

Description

Transfer learning is a sub-field of statistical modeling and machine learning. It refers to methods that integrate the knowledge of other domains (called source domains) and the data of the target domain in a mathematically rigorous and intelligent way, to

Transfer learning is a sub-field of statistical modeling and machine learning. It refers to methods that integrate the knowledge of other domains (called source domains) and the data of the target domain in a mathematically rigorous and intelligent way, to develop a better model for the target domain than a model using the data of the target domain alone. While transfer learning is a promising approach in various application domains, my dissertation research focuses on the particular application in health care, including telemonitoring of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and radiomics for glioblastoma.

The first topic is a Mixed Effects Transfer Learning (METL) model that can flexibly incorporate mixed effects and a general-form covariance matrix to better account for similarity and heterogeneity across subjects. I further develop computationally efficient procedures to handle unknown parameters and large covariance structures. Domain relations, such as domain similarity and domain covariance structure, are automatically quantified in the estimation steps. I demonstrate METL in an application of smartphone-based telemonitoring of PD.

The second topic focuses on an MRI-based transfer learning algorithm for non-invasive surgical guidance of glioblastoma patients. Limited biopsy samples per patient create a challenge to build a patient-specific model for glioblastoma. A transfer learning framework helps to leverage other patient’s knowledge for building a better predictive model. When modeling a target patient, not every patient’s information is helpful. Deciding the subset of other patients from which to transfer information to the modeling of the target patient is an important task to build an accurate predictive model. I define the subset of “transferrable” patients as those who have a positive rCBV-cell density correlation, because a positive correlation is confirmed by imaging theory and the its respective literature.

The last topic is a Privacy-Preserving Positive Transfer Learning (P3TL) model. Although negative transfer has been recognized as an important issue by the transfer learning research community, there is a lack of theoretical studies in evaluating the risk of negative transfer for a transfer learning method and identifying what causes the negative transfer. My work addresses this issue. Driven by the theoretical insights, I extend Bayesian Parameter Transfer (BPT) to a new method, i.e., P3TL. The unique features of P3TL include intelligent selection of patients to transfer in order to avoid negative transfer and maintain patient privacy. These features make P3TL an excellent model for telemonitoring of PD using an At-Home Testing Device.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018

155069-Thumbnail Image.png

Handling sparse and missing data in functional data analysis: a functional mixed-effects model approach

Description

This paper investigates a relatively new analysis method for longitudinal data in the framework of functional data analysis. This approach treats longitudinal data as so-called sparse functional data. The first section of the paper introduces functional data and the general

This paper investigates a relatively new analysis method for longitudinal data in the framework of functional data analysis. This approach treats longitudinal data as so-called sparse functional data. The first section of the paper introduces functional data and the general ideas of functional data analysis. The second section discusses the analysis of longitudinal data in the context of functional data analysis, while considering the unique characteristics of longitudinal data such, in particular sparseness and missing data. The third section introduces functional mixed-effects models that can handle these unique characteristics of sparseness and missingness. The next section discusses a preliminary simulation study conducted to examine the performance of a functional mixed-effects model under various conditions. An extended simulation study was carried out to evaluate the estimation accuracy of a functional mixed-effects model. Specifically, the accuracy of the estimated trajectories was examined under various conditions including different types of missing data and varying levels of sparseness.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016