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A study of heating and degradation of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene/polycarbonate polymer due to ultraviolet lasers illumination during localized pre-deposition heating for fused filament fabrication 3D printing

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With the growing popularity of 3d printing in recreational, research, and commercial enterprises new techniques and processes are being developed to improve the quality of parts created. Even so, the anisotropic properties is still a major hindrance of parts manufactured

With the growing popularity of 3d printing in recreational, research, and commercial enterprises new techniques and processes are being developed to improve the quality of parts created. Even so, the anisotropic properties is still a major hindrance of parts manufactured in this method. The goal is to produce parts that mimic the strength characteristics of a comparable part of the same design and materials created using injection molding. In achieving this goal the production cost can be reduced by eliminating the initial investment needed for the creation of expensive tooling. This initial investment reduction will allow for a wider variant of products in smaller batch runs to be made available. This thesis implements the use of ultraviolet (UV) illumination for an in-process laser local pre-deposition heating (LLPH). By comparing samples with and without the LLPH process it is determined that applied energy that is absorbed by the polymer is converted to an increase in the interlayer temperature, and resulting in an observed increase in tensile strength over the baseline test samples. The increase in interlayer bonding thus can be considered the dominating factor over polymer degradation.

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2017

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Novel materials and processing routes using alkali-activated systems

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This dissertation aims at developing novel materials and processing routes using alkali activated aluminosilicate binders for porous (lightweight) geopolymer matrices and 3D-printing concrete applications. The major research objectives are executed in different stages. Stage 1 includes developing synthesis routes, microstructural

This dissertation aims at developing novel materials and processing routes using alkali activated aluminosilicate binders for porous (lightweight) geopolymer matrices and 3D-printing concrete applications. The major research objectives are executed in different stages. Stage 1 includes developing synthesis routes, microstructural characterization, and performance characterization of a family of economical, multifunctional porous ceramics developed through geopolymerization of an abundant volcanic tuff (aluminosilicate mineral) as the primary source material. Metakaolin, silica fume, alumina powder, and pure silicon powder are also used as additional ingredients when necessary and activated by potassium-based alkaline agents. In Stage 2, a processing route was developed to synthesize lightweight geopolymer matrices from fly ash through carbonate-based activation. Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) was used in this study to produce controlled pores through the release of CO2 during the low-temperature decomposition of Na2CO3. Stage 3 focuses on 3D printing of binders using geopolymeric binders along with several OPC-based 3D printable binders. In Stage 4, synthesis and characterization of 3D-printable foamed fly ash-based geopolymer matrices for thermal insulation is the focus. A surfactant-based foaming process, multi-step mixing that ensures foam jamming transition and thus a dry foam, and microstructural packing to ensure adequate skeletal density are implemented to develop foamed suspensions amenable to 3D-printing. The last stage of this research develops 3D-printable alkali-activated ground granulated blast furnace slag mixture. Slag is used as the source of aluminosilicate and shows excellent mechanical properties when activated by highly alkaline activator (NaOH + sodium silicate solution). However, alkali activated slag sets and hardens rapidly which is undesirable for 3D printing. Thus, a novel mixing procedure is developed to significantly extend the setting time of slag activated with an alkaline activator to suit 3D printing applications without the use of any retarding admixtures. This dissertation, thus advances the field of sustainable and 3D-printable matrices and opens up a new avenue for faster and economical construction using specialized materials.

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2019