Matching Items (6)
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Description
Students afflicted with music performance anxiety (MPA) can greatly benefit from guidance and mentorship from a music teacher with whom they have established trust, however there exists a knowledge gap between the development and manifestations of MPA, and how it can be overcome in order to prepare the student for

Students afflicted with music performance anxiety (MPA) can greatly benefit from guidance and mentorship from a music teacher with whom they have established trust, however there exists a knowledge gap between the development and manifestations of MPA, and how it can be overcome in order to prepare the student for success as a performer. It is my purpose with this guide to inform musicians, including students and teachers, about MPA, common coping methods, and outside resources where pedagogues, students, and even professionals can find further guidance. This document is designed to aid music students and teachers in their individual research on the topic. The first section provides necessary background information on MPA and concepts of gender, identity, and personality. A discussion of the results of an experimental protocol that surveyed double reed musicians about their experiences with performance anxiety comprises the second section. An annotated bibliography, listing other resources including self-help books, personal accounts, and scientific studies, is contained in the final section of this guide. Because of the relative absence of research done on the correlation between MPA and specific identity traits including personality, self-image, and gender, it was necessary to incorporate more generalized sources relating to the topic. The annotations offer a more comprehensive approach to understanding and overcoming MPA. This work is not meant to be all-inclusive; rather, its purpose is to act as a basic guide.
ContributorsMacKenzie, Kate, D.M.A (Author) / Micklich, Albie (Thesis advisor) / Schuring, Martin (Committee member) / Norton, Kay (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2014
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Description
The notion that a singer’s voice is an expression of their personality serves as the catalyst for an examination of the relationship between the continuum of introversion and extraversion, and the pathologies of muscle tension dysphonia, vocal nodules, and performance anxiety. This paper begins with a brief introduction defining

The notion that a singer’s voice is an expression of their personality serves as the catalyst for an examination of the relationship between the continuum of introversion and extraversion, and the pathologies of muscle tension dysphonia, vocal nodules, and performance anxiety. This paper begins with a brief introduction defining extraversion and introversion, followed by a review of personality studies identifying opera singers as primarily extraverted. Definitions of vocal nodules and muscle tension dysphonia are then given along with a list of recommended therapies. These elements tie in with two studies in speech pathology that suggest that behaviors of extraversion contribute to the development of vocal nodules, and behaviors of introversion contribute to muscle tension dysphonia and a higher laryngeal placement. Performance anxiety is shown to compound the behaviors that lead to vocal pathologies in singers. Additional therapies are recommended to address anxiety management in vocal lessons. Finally, since personality factors that contribute to vocal pathology are psychological, it is recommended that voice teachers refer their students to a psychotherapist for proper treatment.
ContributorsCurtis, Paul Josef (Author) / Norton, Kay (Thesis advisor) / Hawkins, Gordon (Thesis advisor) / Dreyfoos, Dale (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2017
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Description
A strong correlation exists between the effects of bullying on a singer and his or her performance anxiety. An exhaustive literature review and a survey of classical singers were used to assess this hypothesis. The survey was compiled using standard psychological and current performance anxiety questionnaires with additional questions created

A strong correlation exists between the effects of bullying on a singer and his or her performance anxiety. An exhaustive literature review and a survey of classical singers were used to assess this hypothesis. The survey was compiled using standard psychological and current performance anxiety questionnaires with additional questions created by the author. The data were analyzed using a Pearson Product-Moment Correlation, a regression analysis, and an Analysis of Variance.
ContributorsThilakaratne, Katherine Marie (Author) / Mills, Robert (Thesis advisor) / Kopta, Anne (Committee member) / DeMars, James (Committee member) / Karoly, Paul (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2017
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Description
The aim of this paper is to empower musicians with the knowledge and tools to address the challenges of music performance anxiety (MPA) with confidence and efficacy. Three evidence-based concepts will be examined, beginning with neuroplasticity, which is the brain’s capacity to change both structurally and functionally. It is thus

The aim of this paper is to empower musicians with the knowledge and tools to address the challenges of music performance anxiety (MPA) with confidence and efficacy. Three evidence-based concepts will be examined, beginning with neuroplasticity, which is the brain’s capacity to change both structurally and functionally. It is thus in a constant state of evolution. On the functional side, evidence demonstrates that it is possible for individuals to change the way they think in order to provide more positive outcomes in music performance. Secondly, existing literature on the cognitive side of learning and optimal performance will be examined; particularly, flow theory of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (1975) and Carol Dweck’s mindset theory (2006). Finally, a review of sports psychology research on mental imagery will be provided. For each area of research, I will suggest strategies with which musicians may incorporate these theories in their own practice and performance in order to develop a growth mindset, alter their negative thought patterns, and overcome MPA, achieving their optimal performance level.
ContributorsLee, Kah Yan (Author) / McLin, Katherine (Thesis advisor) / Norton, Kay (Committee member) / Meyer, Jeffery (Committee member) / Arizona State University (Publisher)
Created2022
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Description

This thesis project is part of the W.P. Carey Founders Lab, a collaborative entrepreneurship track that gives students the opportunity to create a start-up business based on a list of given problems or technologies. The technology selected utilized a piece of NASA technology (U.S. patent application 20200193857) that combines mixed,

This thesis project is part of the W.P. Carey Founders Lab, a collaborative entrepreneurship track that gives students the opportunity to create a start-up business based on a list of given problems or technologies. The technology selected utilized a piece of NASA technology (U.S. patent application 20200193857) that combines mixed, virtual, and augmented reality (MR, VR, and AR) with biofeedback metrics to help athletes get in the zone. The goal is to use the technology during practice so athletes can be better prepared to combat performance anxiety during high-pressure situations. The NASA patent states that if the user’s brain activity, sweat, or heartbeat indicate that they are stressed while completing the activity, the device will make it more difficult for the athlete to complete their task. ITZ’s device increases the difficulty of hitting a target with a ball by obscuring the vision with augmented reality graphics. The visual obstacles will subside if the user’s brain activity metrics indicate that they have become more calm or focused. Due to circumstances outside of the team's control, a prototype was unable to be obtained, and the idea was based on the patent and supporting documentation provided after a meeting with NASA.

ContributorsMaro, Kathleen (Author) / Garza, Nichelle (Co-author) / Turcheck, Abigail (Co-author) / Wang, Qike (Co-author) / Byrne, Jared (Thesis director) / Satpathy, Asish (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / School of Sustainability (Contributor) / School of Molecular Sciences (Contributor) / School of Social Transformation (Contributor)
Created2022-05
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Description
It is estimated that over half of athletes could experience performance anxiety. Currently, there are very few solutions on the market to help athletes prevent performance anxiety besides typical cognitive-behavioral therapy solutions. ITZ Technologies is using NASA-patented technology to combat performance anxiety in elite athletes. This technology includes reading brain

It is estimated that over half of athletes could experience performance anxiety. Currently, there are very few solutions on the market to help athletes prevent performance anxiety besides typical cognitive-behavioral therapy solutions. ITZ Technologies is using NASA-patented technology to combat performance anxiety in elite athletes. This technology includes reading brain activity through electroencephalography and utilizing biofeedback through an engaging augmented reality game to help athletes recognize when they are “out of the zone” and help them reduce their performance anxiety. This product will be marketed to facilities that train high-level athletes to provide training services to their athletes. Surveys and interviews with athletes and those in the sports performance industry have shown favorable feedback on the device concept.
ContributorsWang, Qike (Author) / Turcheck, Abigail (Co-author) / Maro, Kathleen (Co-author) / Garza, Nichelle (Co-author) / Byrne, Jared (Thesis director) / Satpathy, Asish (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Department of Finance (Contributor) / Department of Information Systems (Contributor) / Department of Economics (Contributor) / Department of Supply Chain Management (Contributor)
Created2022-05