Description
The honors thesis explores the relationship between academic majors and the entrepreneurial mindset, focusing on whether Computer Science students have a perceived edge. The study involves a survey of 121 diverse Arizona State University students, complemented by in-depth interviews with

The honors thesis explores the relationship between academic majors and the entrepreneurial mindset, focusing on whether Computer Science students have a perceived edge. The study involves a survey of 121 diverse Arizona State University students, complemented by in-depth interviews with 12 participants across various majors. Insights reveal the complex interplay of psychological factors influencing major selection, with Computer Science students advocating for more entrepreneurship-related courses. Challenges include time constraints for STEM majors in pursuing extracurricular activities and a call for universities to proactively integrate entrepreneurship education. While acknowledging the study's limitations, the thesis emphasizes the need for universities to adapt to changing student mindsets. Despite hurdles, the collective belief is that internal determination and effort drive students forward.
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    Barrett Honors College theses and creative projects are restricted to ASU community members.

    Details

    Title
    • Examining the Relationship between Academic Majors and the Entrepreneurial Mindset: Do Computer Science Students Have an Edge?
    Contributors
    Date Created
    2023-12
    Resource Type
  • Text
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