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Description
The Salt River wild horses are a historic population of unbranded, unclaimed, wild and free-roaming horses, that were born in the wild and merit protection within our National Forest and protection of the Wild Horse and Burro act of 1970.

The Salt River wild horses are a historic population of unbranded, unclaimed, wild and free-roaming horses, that were born in the wild and merit protection within our National Forest and protection of the Wild Horse and Burro act of 1970. Terms like undomesticated or feral are thrown around in place of “wild”. The past couple of decades or so, there has been an ongoing debate about the current state of the horses on the range. The horses that are along the Salt River, are considered to be state protected and not federally protected, which has sparked a vast discussion on the social, ethical and moral aspects. There has been an overabundance of horses on the range and are causing potential issues to the environment and other farmland. According to the BLM, wild horse and burro populations have a demonstrated ability to grow at 18-20 percent per year. With the widespread and overabundance that is occurring with the horses and burros, it has been said to have a great ecological cost on the rangeland ecosystem by overgrazing native plants, exacerbating invasive establishment and out-competing other ungulates like cattle. Overabundant free-roaming horse and burro populations have large and growing economic and ecological costs for the American public. Without effective management actions, horse and burro populations will double within the next 4-5 years. In this project, with the help of Dr. Julie Murphree, the Salt River Horse Management group and Arizona’s State Liaison for the Department of Agriculture, I conducted various ride-a-longs and conducted my own literature study to further solidify the knowledge I gained when navigating through the Salt River Wild Horse Management group. I can use their data as well as my own observations in the field to catalog their behaviors and look for any signs that would give reason to why this method of population control may or may not be used. I was able to note the horses in their “natural state” which would give me the opportunity to see any behavior changes in various population groups (or otherwise known as Bands). The main objective of this paper is to understand PZP as a population control tool and the effect it has on the Salt River Horses in Arizona.
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    Details

    Title
    • The Efficacy of Porcine zona pellucida (PZP) on the Salt River Horses
    Contributors
    Date Created
    2022-05
    Resource Type
  • Text
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