Music Therapy-Based Workplace Health Promotion Programming: Wellness Facilitated Through Community Music-Making Experientials

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Wellness in the workplace is a significant concern for many companies as employees experience both physical and mental health issues based on the environment in which they work. Both sedentary

Wellness in the workplace is a significant concern for many companies as employees experience both physical and mental health issues based on the environment in which they work. Both sedentary behavior and job-related stress, which may cooccur, are associated with the development of chronic disease, occupational stress, absenteeism/presenteeism in the workplace, increased employee turnover, and ultimately higher health care costs for companies. The development and implementation of workplace health promotion programs (WHPPs) is a popular, and at times, highly successful option to mitigate these issues. Yet, even when companies offer WHPPs, there still tends to be a lack of overall awareness, participation, and sustained engagement. Existing research regarding recreational music making (RMM) in the workplace and music therapy to improve wellness may serve to support the development of music therapy-based WHPPs as an effective solution. The evidence-based field of music therapy is an established health profession that uses music interventions to assist individuals in achieving their non-musical goals. This clinical project serves to highlight existing literature in support of the development of music therapy-based WHPPS. Furthermore, by tethering the tenets of previously successful WHPPs, the basic principles of collectivism, and the structural underpinnings of community music therapy, this clinical project offers evidence-based experientials and assessment tools for future implementation. Treatment domains addressed are physiological and psychosocial. Proposed goals include increased opportunity for physical activity, increased opportunity for stress-reduction and relaxation, and increased opportunity for social interaction among participants.