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Although much has been done to examine the relationship between unemployment and crime, little consideration has been given to the impact neighborhood-level factors such as informal social control may have

Although much has been done to examine the relationship between unemployment and crime, little consideration has been given to the impact neighborhood-level factors such as informal social control may have on the strength of unemployment as a predictor of crime. The present study seeks to fill this gap by assessing whether the declining crime rates over a period of surging unemployment under the financial crisis are due to unchanged levels of informal social control.

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    Date Created
    • 2016
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2016
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (pages 48-52)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Criminology

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    Statement of Responsibility

    by Mary Elizabeth Hoyle

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