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This study looks at Geoffrey Chaucer's use of the color green as it appears in regards to the settings and antagonists of three of the Canterbury Tales: the Wife of

This study looks at Geoffrey Chaucer's use of the color green as it appears in regards to the settings and antagonists of three of the Canterbury Tales: the Wife of Bath's Tale, the Friar's Tale, and the Merchant's Tale. Following the allegorical approach, it argues that the color green in these tales is symbolic of Fortune, modeled upon Boethian philosophy and the allegory of Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun's thirteenth century French poem, The Romance of the Rose.

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    Date Created
    • 2014
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: M.A., Arizona State University, 2014
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 45-47)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: English

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    by Krista Lemman

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