A theory-based pilot study to decrease sitting time in the workplace

Document
Description

The purpose of this pilot randomized control trial was to test the initial efficacy of a 10 week social cognitive theory (SCT)-based intervention to reduce workplace sitting time (ST). Participants

The purpose of this pilot randomized control trial was to test the initial efficacy of a 10 week social cognitive theory (SCT)-based intervention to reduce workplace sitting time (ST). Participants were currently employed adults with predominantly sedentary occupations (n=24) working in the Greater Phoenix area in 2012-2013. Participants wore an activPAL (AP) inclinometer to assess postural allocation (i.e., sitting vs. standing) and Actigraph accelerometer (AG) to assess sedentary time for one week prior to beginning and immediately following the completion of the 10 week intervention. Self-reported measures of sedentary time were obtained via two validated questionnaires for overall (International Physical Activity Questionnaire [IPAQ]) and domain specific sedentary behaviors (Sedentary Behavior Questionnaire [SBQ]). SCT constructs were also measured pre and post via adapted physical activity questionnaires. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either (a) 10 weekly social cognitive-based e-newsletters focused on reducing workplace ST; or (b) similarly formatted 10 weekly e-newsletters focusing on health education. Baseline adjusted Analysis of Covariance statistical analyses were used to examine differences between groups in time spent sitting (AP) and sedentary (AG) during self-reported work hours from pre- to post- intervention. Both groups decreased ST and AG sedentary time; however, no significant differences were observed. SCT constructs also did not change significantly between pretest and post test in either group. These results indicate that individualized educational approaches to decreasing workplace sitting time may not be sufficient for observing long term change in behaviors. Future research should utilize a larger sample, measure main outcomes more frequently, and incorporate more environmental factors throughout the intervention.