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Although it is commonly assumed that consumers eat more and find food to be more attractive when hungry, surprisingly little research has looked at how robust this effect might be

Although it is commonly assumed that consumers eat more and find food to be more attractive when hungry, surprisingly little research has looked at how robust this effect might be and what could moderate it. Building on theories of hunger and self-control, this research examines which types of foods (hedonic or utilitarian) are more attractive and likely to be consumed by hungry consumers. Across a series of six experiments I find that when hungry and under reduced cognitive capacity, consumers find hedonic foods more attractive and consume them in larger quantities.

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    Date Created
    • 2012
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  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2012
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 44-47)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Business administration

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    by Christine Ringler

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