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This dissertation considers why several characters on the Early Modern Stage choose to remain silent when speech seems warranted. By examining the circumstances and effects of self-silencing on both the

This dissertation considers why several characters on the Early Modern Stage choose to remain silent when speech seems warranted. By examining the circumstances and effects of self-silencing on both the character and his/her community, I argue that silencing is an exercise of power that simultaneously subjectifies the silent one and compels the community (textual or theatrical) to ethical self-examination.

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    Date Created
    • 2011
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph. D., Arizona State University, 2011
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: English

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    Statement of Responsibility

    by Penelope Krouse

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