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Many methods of passive flow control rely on changes to surface morphology. Roughening surfaces to induce boundary layer transition to turbulence and in turn delay separation is a powerful approach

Many methods of passive flow control rely on changes to surface morphology. Roughening surfaces to induce boundary layer transition to turbulence and in turn delay separation is a powerful approach to lowering drag on bluff bodies. While the influence in broad terms of how roughness and other means of passive flow control to delay separation on bluff bodies is known, basic mechanisms are not well understood. Of particular interest for the current work is understanding the role of surface dimpling on boundary layers. A computational approach is employed and the study has two main goals.

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    Date Created
    • 2011
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  • Text
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    • Partial requirement for: M.S., Arizona State University, 2011
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p
    • Field of study: Mechanical engineering

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    by Jeremiah J. Gutierrez-Jensen

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