Integrative analyses of diverse biological data sources

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The technology expansion seen in the last decade for genomics research has permitted the generation of large-scale data sources pertaining to molecular biological assays, genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and other modern

The technology expansion seen in the last decade for genomics research has permitted the generation of large-scale data sources pertaining to molecular biological assays, genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics and other modern omics catalogs. New methods to analyze, integrate and visualize these data types are essential to unveil relevant disease mechanisms. Towards these objectives, this research focuses on data integration within two scenarios: (1) transcriptomic, proteomic and functional information and (2) real-time sensor-based measurements motivated by single-cell technology. To assess relationships between protein abundance, transcriptomic and functional data, a nonlinear model was explored at static and temporal levels. The successful integration of these heterogeneous data sources through the stochastic gradient boosted tree approach and its improved predictability are some highlights of this work. Through the development of an innovative validation subroutine based on a permutation approach and the use of external information (i.e., operons), lack of a priori knowledge for undetected proteins was overcome. The integrative methodologies allowed for the identification of undetected proteins for Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Shewanella oneidensis for further biological exploration in laboratories towards finding functional relationships. In an effort to better understand diseases such as cancer at different developmental stages, the Microscale Life Science Center headquartered at the Arizona State University is pursuing single-cell studies by developing novel technologies. This research arranged and applied a statistical framework that tackled the following challenges: random noise, heterogeneous dynamic systems with multiple states, and understanding cell behavior within and across different Barrett's esophageal epithelial cell lines using oxygen consumption curves. These curves were characterized with good empirical fit using nonlinear models with simple structures which allowed extraction of a large number of features. Application of a supervised classification model to these features and the integration of experimental factors allowed for identification of subtle patterns among different cell types visualized through multidimensional scaling. Motivated by the challenges of analyzing real-time measurements, we further explored a unique two-dimensional representation of multiple time series using a wavelet approach which showcased promising results towards less complex approximations. Also, the benefits of external information were explored to improve the image representation.