Description

Locomotion of microorganisms is commonly observed in nature. Although microorganism locomotion is commonly attributed to mechanical deformation of solid appendages, in 1956 Nobel Laureate Peter Mitchell proposed that an asymmetric

Locomotion of microorganisms is commonly observed in nature. Although microorganism locomotion is commonly attributed to mechanical deformation of solid appendages, in 1956 Nobel Laureate Peter Mitchell proposed that an asymmetric ion flux on a bacterium's surface could generate electric fields that drive locomotion via self-electrophoresis. Recent advances in nanofabrication have enabled the engineering of synthetic analogues, bimetallic colloidal particles, that swim due to asymmetric ion flux originally proposed by Mitchell.

Reuse Permissions
  • 4.41 MB application/pdf

    Download count: 0

    Details

    Contributors
    Date Created
    • 2011
    Resource Type
  • Text
  • Collections this item is in
    Note
    • Partial requirement for: Ph.D., Arizona State University, 2011
      Note type
      thesis
    • Includes bibliographical references (p. 129-132)
      Note type
      bibliography
    • Field of study: Mechanical engineering

    Citation and reuse

    Statement of Responsibility

    by Philip Matthew Wheat

    Machine-readable links