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Background: Multiple studies show that obesity and depression tend to cluster in women. An “appearance concern” pathway has been proposed as one basic explanation of why higher weights might lead to

Background: Multiple studies show that obesity and depression tend to cluster in women. An “appearance concern” pathway has been proposed as one basic explanation of why higher weights might lead to depression. The transition to motherhood is a life phase in which women’s body image, weight, and depressive risk are in flux, with average weight increasing overall during this period. Examination of how these factors interact from pre- to post-pregnancy provides a means to test how body image plays a key role, as proposed, in causally shaping women’s depressive risk.

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    Date Created
    • 2016-07-29
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  • Text
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    • Digital object identifier: 10.1186/s12889-016-3363-8
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1471-2458
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    This is a suggested citation. Consult the appropriate style guide for specific citation guidelines.

    Han, S., Brewis, A. A., & Wutich, A. (2016). Body image mediates the depressive effects of weight gain in new mothers, particularly for women already obese: evidence from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. BMC Public Health, 16(1). doi:10.1186/s12889-016-3363-8

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