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The value of “diversity” in social and ecological systems is frequently asserted in academic and policy literature. Diversity is thought to enhance the resilience of social-ecological systems to varied and

The value of “diversity” in social and ecological systems is frequently asserted in academic and policy literature. Diversity is thought to enhance the resilience of social-ecological systems to varied and potentially uncertain future conditions. Yet there are trade-offs; diversity in ecological and social domains has costs as well as benefits. In this paper, we examine social diversity, specifically its costs and benefits in terms of decision making in middle range or tribal societies, using archaeological evidence spanning seven centuries from four regions of the U.S. Southwest.

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    Date Created
    • 2011
    Resource Type
  • Text
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    Identifier
    • Digital object identifier: 10.5751/es-03887-160125
    • Identifier Type
      International standard serial number
      Identifier Value
      1708-3087

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    Nelson, M. C., Hegmon, M., Kulow, S. R., Peeples, M. A., Kintigh, K. W., & Kinzig, A. P. (2011). Resisting Diversity: a Long-Term Archaeological Study. Ecology and Society, 16(1). doi:10.5751/es-03887-160125

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